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Intel i5-4570 CPU compatibility with 2400 mhz memory ddr3 sdram - SPECS 1600 mhz max. Why? :(

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January 4, 2014 4:08:19 PM

Hey guys, this is my first post here, I decided to sign in because this site has always been very useful to me!

This is my second desktop computer that I am prepping to build (loved to do my first one).

I think I have a problem, I cant find good information about it with search engine. I don't wanna spend time installing all the cpu to find out that I need to put it apart. please.

I got those 2 components, and I just find out that i5-4570 only support up to 1600mhz ram... :( 
I really didn't know that cpu had anything to do with memory...
Intel i5-4570 (no 'K) VS Gskill TridentX 2400mhz ddr3 sdram memory 2x 4GB.

How come a new gen of intel cpu cant use higher frequency memory?

That can't be true, could I simply adjust that into the bios?

The setup so far (that I already bought);
Intel i5-4570
Phanteks PH-TC14PE cpu cooler
Gskill tridentX 8GB 2400mhz
2-way SLI Evga GTX760 4GB
250GB Samsung EVO SSD - OS
500GB Samsung EVO SSD - Games
1000w Evga supernova power supply

Planning to use ASUS Maximus vi formula motherboard

Thanks for help!



a c 88 à CPUs
January 4, 2014 4:53:17 PM

maxthehax said:
Hey guys, this is my first post here, I decided to sign in because this site has always been very useful to me!

This is my second desktop computer that I am prepping to build (loved to do my first one).

I think I have a problem, I cant find good information about it with search engine. I don't wanna spend time installing all the cpu to find out that I need to put it apart.

I got those 2 components, and I just find out that i5-4570 only support up to 1600mhz ram... :( 
I really didn't know that cpu had anything to do with memory...
Intel i5-4570 (no 'K) VS Gskill TridentX 2400mhz ddr3 sdram memory 2x 4GB.

How come a new gen of intel cpu cant use higher frequency memory?

That can't be true, could I simply adjust that into the bios?

The setup so far (that I already bought);
Intel i5-4570
Phanteks PH-TC14PE cpu cooler
Gskill tridentX 8GB 2400mhz
2-way SLI Evga GTX760 4GB
250GB Samsung EVO SSD - OS
500GB Samsung EVO SSD - Games
1000w Evga supernova power supply

Planning to use ASUS Maximus vi formula motherboard

Thanks for help!





unlocked k due to it can occ
the others youd have to get the i5 4570 to occ to a way it can use the 2400
m
0
l
January 4, 2014 5:10:26 PM

beyondlogic said:

unlocked k due to it can occ
MAX: ?My i5-4570 is NOT unlocked. It is not a K model. I never though it would require OC'ing my system to use higher frequency rated memory.
the others youd have to get the i5 4570 to occ to a way it can use the 2400
Max: Is there a way to overclock ONLY my memory to get my 1.65V 2400mhz? Is XMP made for that? Is my LOCKED i5-4570 haswell XMP ready?



thanks


m
0
l
Related resources
a c 88 à CPUs
January 4, 2014 5:23:04 PM

maxthehax said:
beyondlogic said:

unlocked k due to it can occ
MAX: ?My i5-4570 is NOT unlocked. I never though it would require OC'ing my system to use higher frequency rated memory.
the others youd have to get the i5 4570 to occ to a way it can use the 2400
Max: Is there a way to overclock ONLY my memory to get my 1.65V 2400mhz? Is XMP made for that? Is my LOCKED i5-4570 haswell XMP ready?



thanks




ah that might be a problem the voltage

1.65v is not recomended for haswell or ivy bridge unless occing intel recomends 1.5v

and speed the board may accept 2400mhz memory and cpu may use it or it may downclock it to 1600mhz
and may downclock voltage to make it support the processor
m
0
l
January 4, 2014 5:32:06 PM

beyondlogic said:
maxthehax said:
beyondlogic said:

unlocked k due to it can occ
MAX: ?My i5-4570 is NOT unlocked. I never though it would require OC'ing my system to use higher frequency rated memory.
the others youd have to get the i5 4570 to occ to a way it can use the 2400
Max: Is there a way to overclock ONLY my memory to get my 1.65V 2400mhz? Is XMP made for that? Is my LOCKED i5-4570 haswell XMP ready?



thanks




ah that might be a problem the voltage

1.65v is not recomended for haswell or ivy bridge unless occing intel recomends 1.5v

and speed the board may accept 2400mhz memory and cpu may use it or it may downclock it to 1600mhz
and may downclock voltage to make it support the processor


Max: Can I OverClock my memory voltage to 1.65V even with a locked cpu model, are they related? The board is a ASUS Maximus 6 Formula with the ROG armor LGA1150 Haswell, im pretty sure it could handle the OC. The board is also rated for more than 2400 memory.

XMP claim to be able to OC DDR3 up to 3,000mhz, that should do the trick to get up to 2400?

I don't see any specs telling me that my i5-4570 is XMP ready...

Thanks
m
0
l
January 5, 2014 4:36:55 AM

I think I kinda found my answer, please correct me if Im wrong.

The motherboard is the part giving me XMP feature, not the CPU itself.
If I take particular attention on the motherboard specs;
http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/MAXIMUS_VI_FORMULA/#sp...
All frequency higher than 1600 are marked as O.C (overclock imo), that mean this board can give you higher (2400 ie) but require overclocking the memory.

I think I should be able to do it with my i5-4570 even if its a locked (not 'K) model, because we are O.C the memory not the CPU itself (which is locked).

So even if Intel specs their 4th gen haswell CPU with a maximum of 1600mhz memory frequency, I should be able to O.C the memory within the motherboard bios to get my 1.65V 2400mhz rating.

Again, I am not 100% sure, because I've not tested myself, but please correct me if Im wrong. I still have about 14days before I build the computer.

My main concern is about my CPU i5-4570 being a locked version, which cannot be O.C. I wonder if overclocking the memory is related to this. Do I need a 'K version (unlocked) to O.C memory?

Thanks
m
0
l
a c 169 à CPUs
a c 128 } Memory
January 5, 2014 4:45:56 AM

maxthehax said:
Hey guys, this is my first post here, I decided to sign in because this site has always been very useful to me!

This is my second desktop computer that I am prepping to build (loved to do my first one).

I think I have a problem, I cant find good information about it with search engine. I don't wanna spend time installing all the cpu to find out that I need to put it apart. please.

I got those 2 components, and I just find out that i5-4570 only support up to 1600mhz ram... :( 
I really didn't know that cpu had anything to do with memory...
Intel i5-4570 (no 'K) VS Gskill TridentX 2400mhz ddr3 sdram memory 2x 4GB.

How come a new gen of intel cpu cant use higher frequency memory?

That can't be true, could I simply adjust that into the bios?

The setup so far (that I already bought);
Intel i5-4570
Phanteks PH-TC14PE cpu cooler
Gskill tridentX 8GB 2400mhz
2-way SLI Evga GTX760 4GB
250GB Samsung EVO SSD - OS
500GB Samsung EVO SSD - Games
1000w Evga supernova power supply

Planning to use ASUS Maximus vi formula motherboard

Thanks for help!





Hi there,

Intel's Haswell microprocessors are tested up to DDR3-1600 at JEDEC standard voltage and timings. It is possible for the microprocessor to run memory at a faster speed and there are provisions for this on most motherboards, but functionality and stability is only guaranteed within the parameters that Intel designs and tests for. Even though the Haswell microprocessors are only tested up to DDR3-1600, almost all of them should have no trouble running memory up to DDR3-2133 without issue simply by activating the XMP profile contained on the memory module. Speeds above DDR3-2133 may require a little bit of extra tweaking such as increasing the voltage to the memory controller itself.

So yes, you can simply adjust it in the firmware settings. Please keep in mind though that running DRAM above DDR3-1600 in a Haswell microprocessor does involve overclocking the memory controller and care should be taken as a result.
m
0
l
January 5, 2014 4:53:09 AM

Pinhedd said:
maxthehax said:
Hey guys, this is my first post here, I decided to sign in because this site has always been very useful to me!

This is my second desktop computer that I am prepping to build (loved to do my first one).

I think I have a problem, I cant find good information about it with search engine. I don't wanna spend time installing all the cpu to find out that I need to put it apart. please.

I got those 2 components, and I just find out that i5-4570 only support up to 1600mhz ram... :( 
I really didn't know that cpu had anything to do with memory...
Intel i5-4570 (no 'K) VS Gskill TridentX 2400mhz ddr3 sdram memory 2x 4GB.

How come a new gen of intel cpu cant use higher frequency memory?

That can't be true, could I simply adjust that into the bios?

The setup so far (that I already bought);
Intel i5-4570
Phanteks PH-TC14PE cpu cooler
Gskill tridentX 8GB 2400mhz
2-way SLI Evga GTX760 4GB
250GB Samsung EVO SSD - OS
500GB Samsung EVO SSD - Games
1000w Evga supernova power supply

Planning to use ASUS Maximus vi formula motherboard

Thanks for help!





Hi there,

Intel's Haswell microprocessors are tested up to DDR3-1600 at JEDEC standard voltage and timings. It is possible for the microprocessor to run memory at a faster speed and there are provisions for this on most motherboards, but functionality and stability is only guaranteed within the parameters that Intel designs and tests for. Even though the Haswell microprocessors are only tested up to DDR3-1600, almost all of them should have no trouble running memory up to DDR3-2133 without issue simply by activating the XMP profile contained on the memory module. Speeds above DDR3-2133 may require a little bit of extra tweaking such as increasing the voltage to the memory controller itself.

So yes, you can simply adjust it in the firmware settings. Please keep in mind though that running DRAM above DDR3-1600 in a Haswell microprocessor does involve overclocking the memory controller and care should be taken as a result.


Thanks for input! ...

I will be pushing more than 2133, my ram is TridentX @2400mhz 1.65V

By enabling 1.65V 2400mhz, what part will suffer the most? What part will get more stress? The motherboard? The cpu?

Because my mobo (Asus Maximus vi Formula) can push O.C in the 31000mhz, so looking at the specs I dont see any problem for the board to overclock only 2400mhz.

Could that be bad for my CPU? I will be using good thermal solution.
m
0
l
a c 169 à CPUs
a c 128 } Memory
January 5, 2014 5:13:16 AM

maxthehax said:
Pinhedd said:
maxthehax said:
Hey guys, this is my first post here, I decided to sign in because this site has always been very useful to me!

This is my second desktop computer that I am prepping to build (loved to do my first one).

I think I have a problem, I cant find good information about it with search engine. I don't wanna spend time installing all the cpu to find out that I need to put it apart. please.

I got those 2 components, and I just find out that i5-4570 only support up to 1600mhz ram... :( 
I really didn't know that cpu had anything to do with memory...
Intel i5-4570 (no 'K) VS Gskill TridentX 2400mhz ddr3 sdram memory 2x 4GB.

How come a new gen of intel cpu cant use higher frequency memory?

That can't be true, could I simply adjust that into the bios?

The setup so far (that I already bought);
Intel i5-4570
Phanteks PH-TC14PE cpu cooler
Gskill tridentX 8GB 2400mhz
2-way SLI Evga GTX760 4GB
250GB Samsung EVO SSD - OS
500GB Samsung EVO SSD - Games
1000w Evga supernova power supply

Planning to use ASUS Maximus vi formula motherboard

Thanks for help!





Hi there,

Intel's Haswell microprocessors are tested up to DDR3-1600 at JEDEC standard voltage and timings. It is possible for the microprocessor to run memory at a faster speed and there are provisions for this on most motherboards, but functionality and stability is only guaranteed within the parameters that Intel designs and tests for. Even though the Haswell microprocessors are only tested up to DDR3-1600, almost all of them should have no trouble running memory up to DDR3-2133 without issue simply by activating the XMP profile contained on the memory module. Speeds above DDR3-2133 may require a little bit of extra tweaking such as increasing the voltage to the memory controller itself.

So yes, you can simply adjust it in the firmware settings. Please keep in mind though that running DRAM above DDR3-1600 in a Haswell microprocessor does involve overclocking the memory controller and care should be taken as a result.


Thanks for input! ...

I will be pushing more than 2133, my ram is TridentX @2400mhz 1.65V

By enabling 1.65V 2400mhz, what part will suffer the most? What part will get more stress? The motherboard? The cpu?

Because my mobo (Asus Maximus vi Formula) can push O.C in the 31000mhz, so looking at the specs I dont see any problem for the board to overclock only 2400mhz.

Could that be bad for my CPU? I will be using good thermal solution.


The motherboard will handle it, the DRAM will handle it, but it is not guaranteed that the CPU will handle it. DDR3 is far more forgiving than DDR2 but anything above DDR3-2133 can be a bit hit and miss. Fortunately Intel's integrated memory controller is extremely robust.

The part that you may have to play around with a bit is the IMC or Integrated Memory Controller. 1.5 volts is the recommended DRAM supply voltage when stability is the primary consideration with standard 5% tolerance for an absolute maximum of 1.575 volts. When stability is not a primary concern the maximum supply voltage per Intel's IMC spec is somewhere around 1.8 volts and per JEDEC's DDR3 spec is around 1.9 volts. I've never seen modules require more than 1.65 volts though and I've been running that in my desktop for two years without issue. Keep in mind though that you shouldn't expect datacenter levels of stability here, your system may run Prime95/Memtest for a week without issue and then crash randomly. That's just a risk of running high speed memory; bit error rates are exponentially higher.

With that said, the additional stress that DDR3-2400 places on the IMC over its tested DDR3-1600 may necessitate increasing the supply voltage to the IMC itself. I do not know what it is on the Haswell microarchitecture but on my 3960x I have it set to 1.15 volts which is slightly above its default. I would not exceed 1.2 volts on the IMC and even this much should not be necessary but if I recall correctly 1.4 volts is the absolute safe maximum.

Finally, the PLL which generates the DRAM controller clock and IO bus reference clock (it'll be 1200Mhz for your DDR3-2400 modules) may require a slight boost of about 0.1 volts.

You may want to get a second opinion on the voltage levels for the IMC and PLL from someone who owns a Haswell microprocessor.

All of this will add a small thermal footprint. Not enough to worry about though.

As I mentioned above, caution is paramount when overclocking. Damage is rare, especially when playing with only the DRAM, but you wouldn't want to end up with an Intel i5-4570PE (Paperweight Edition).
m
0
l
January 5, 2014 5:26:07 AM

Pinhedd said:


The motherboard will handle it, the DRAM will handle it, but it is not guaranteed that the CPU will handle it. DDR3 is far more forgiving than DDR2 but anything above DDR3-2133 can be a bit hit and miss. Fortunately Intel's integrated memory controller is extremely robust.

The part that you may have to play around with a bit is the IMC or Integrated Memory Controller. 1.5 volts is the recommended DRAM supply voltage when stability is the primary consideration with standard 5% tolerance for an absolute maximum of 1.575 volts. When stability is not a primary concern the maximum supply voltage per Intel's IMC spec is somewhere around 1.8 volts and per JEDEC's DDR3 spec is around 1.9 volts. I've never seen modules require more than 1.65 volts though and I've been running that in my desktop for two years without issue. Keep in mind though that you shouldn't expect datacenter levels of stability here, your system may run Prime95/Memtest for a week without issue and then crash randomly. That's just a risk of running high speed memory; bit error rates are exponentially higher.

With that said, the additional stress that DDR3-2400 places on the IMC over its tested DDR3-1600 may necessitate increasing the supply voltage to the IMC itself. I do not know what it is on the Haswell microarchitecture but on my 3960x I have it set to 1.15 volts which is slightly above its default. I would not exceed 1.2 volts on the IMC and even this much should not be necessary but if I recall correctly 1.4 volts is the absolute safe maximum.

Finally, the PLL which generates the DRAM controller clock and IO bus reference clock (it'll be 1200Mhz for your DDR3-2400 modules) may require a slight boost of about 0.1 volts.

You may want to get a second opinion on the voltage levels for the IMC and PLL from someone who owns a Haswell microprocessor.

All of this will add a small thermal footprint. Not enough to worry about though.

As I mentioned above, caution is paramount when overclocking. Damage is rare, especially when playing with only the DRAM, but you wouldn't want to end up with an Intel i5-4570PE (Paperweight Edition).


What is Paperweight edition ? :p 

So whats my choices here? Should I buy another CPU alone than can handle it, or maybe the problem is the haswell itself...? If I take a look at the i7-4570K (which would be my choice) it is still rated at 1600mhz from intel.

I think my problem is my RAM, I should look into a 1600mhz memory with lower latency timing. I dont know how to calculate that though, I would like to get 1600mhz ram that would be the same speed of my 2400 with higher timing...
m
0
l
a c 88 à CPUs
January 5, 2014 6:46:07 AM

maxthehax said:
beyondlogic said:
maxthehax said:
beyondlogic said:

unlocked k due to it can occ
MAX: ?My i5-4570 is NOT unlocked. I never though it would require OC'ing my system to use higher frequency rated memory.
the others youd have to get the i5 4570 to occ to a way it can use the 2400
Max: Is there a way to overclock ONLY my memory to get my 1.65V 2400mhz? Is XMP made for that? Is my LOCKED i5-4570 haswell XMP ready?



thanks




ah that might be a problem the voltage

1.65v is not recomended for haswell or ivy bridge unless occing intel recomends 1.5v

and speed the board may accept 2400mhz memory and cpu may use it or it may downclock it to 1600mhz
and may downclock voltage to make it support the processor


Max: Can I OverClock my memory voltage to 1.65V even with a locked cpu model, are they related? The board is a ASUS Maximus 6 Formula with the ROG armor LGA1150 Haswell, im pretty sure it could handle the OC. The board is also rated for more than 2400 memory.

XMP claim to be able to OC DDR3 up to 3,000mhz, that should do the trick to get up to 2400?

I don't see any specs telling me that my i5-4570 is XMP ready...

Thanks


maxthehax said:
Pinhedd said:


The motherboard will handle it, the DRAM will handle it, but it is not guaranteed that the CPU will handle it. DDR3 is far more forgiving than DDR2 but anything above DDR3-2133 can be a bit hit and miss. Fortunately Intel's integrated memory controller is extremely robust.

The part that you may have to play around with a bit is the IMC or Integrated Memory Controller. 1.5 volts is the recommended DRAM supply voltage when stability is the primary consideration with standard 5% tolerance for an absolute maximum of 1.575 volts. When stability is not a primary concern the maximum supply voltage per Intel's IMC spec is somewhere around 1.8 volts and per JEDEC's DDR3 spec is around 1.9 volts. I've never seen modules require more than 1.65 volts though and I've been running that in my desktop for two years without issue. Keep in mind though that you shouldn't expect datacenter levels of stability here, your system may run Prime95/Memtest for a week without issue and then crash randomly. That's just a risk of running high speed memory; bit error rates are exponentially higher.

With that said, the additional stress that DDR3-2400 places on the IMC over its tested DDR3-1600 may necessitate increasing the supply voltage to the IMC itself. I do not know what it is on the Haswell microarchitecture but on my 3960x I have it set to 1.15 volts which is slightly above its default. I would not exceed 1.2 volts on the IMC and even this much should not be necessary but if I recall correctly 1.4 volts is the absolute safe maximum.

Finally, the PLL which generates the DRAM controller clock and IO bus reference clock (it'll be 1200Mhz for your DDR3-2400 modules) may require a slight boost of about 0.1 volts.

You may want to get a second opinion on the voltage levels for the IMC and PLL from someone who owns a Haswell microprocessor.

All of this will add a small thermal footprint. Not enough to worry about though.

As I mentioned above, caution is paramount when overclocking. Damage is rare, especially when playing with only the DRAM, but you wouldn't want to end up with an Intel i5-4570PE (Paperweight Edition).


What is Paperweight edition ? :p 

So whats my choices here? Should I buy another CPU alone than can handle it, or maybe the problem is the haswell itself...? If I take a look at the i7-4570K (which would be my choice) it is still rated at 1600mhz from intel.

I think my problem is my RAM, I should look into a 1600mhz memory with lower latency timing. I dont know how to calculate that though, I would like to get 1600mhz ram that would be the same speed of my 2400 with higher timing...


tridents lateny timings are technically slower then most 1600mhz memory

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

7 8 8 8 24
m
0
l
January 5, 2014 6:54:28 AM

beyondlogic said:
maxthehax said:
beyondlogic said:
maxthehax said:
beyondlogic said:

unlocked k due to it can occ
MAX: ?My i5-4570 is NOT unlocked. I never though it would require OC'ing my system to use higher frequency rated memory.
the others youd have to get the i5 4570 to occ to a way it can use the 2400
Max: Is there a way to overclock ONLY my memory to get my 1.65V 2400mhz? Is XMP made for that? Is my LOCKED i5-4570 haswell XMP ready?



thanks




ah that might be a problem the voltage

1.65v is not recomended for haswell or ivy bridge unless occing intel recomends 1.5v

and speed the board may accept 2400mhz memory and cpu may use it or it may downclock it to 1600mhz
and may downclock voltage to make it support the processor


Max: Can I OverClock my memory voltage to 1.65V even with a locked cpu model, are they related? The board is a ASUS Maximus 6 Formula with the ROG armor LGA1150 Haswell, im pretty sure it could handle the OC. The board is also rated for more than 2400 memory.

XMP claim to be able to OC DDR3 up to 3,000mhz, that should do the trick to get up to 2400?

I don't see any specs telling me that my i5-4570 is XMP ready...

Thanks


maxthehax said:
Pinhedd said:


The motherboard will handle it, the DRAM will handle it, but it is not guaranteed that the CPU will handle it. DDR3 is far more forgiving than DDR2 but anything above DDR3-2133 can be a bit hit and miss. Fortunately Intel's integrated memory controller is extremely robust.

The part that you may have to play around with a bit is the IMC or Integrated Memory Controller. 1.5 volts is the recommended DRAM supply voltage when stability is the primary consideration with standard 5% tolerance for an absolute maximum of 1.575 volts. When stability is not a primary concern the maximum supply voltage per Intel's IMC spec is somewhere around 1.8 volts and per JEDEC's DDR3 spec is around 1.9 volts. I've never seen modules require more than 1.65 volts though and I've been running that in my desktop for two years without issue. Keep in mind though that you shouldn't expect datacenter levels of stability here, your system may run Prime95/Memtest for a week without issue and then crash randomly. That's just a risk of running high speed memory; bit error rates are exponentially higher.

With that said, the additional stress that DDR3-2400 places on the IMC over its tested DDR3-1600 may necessitate increasing the supply voltage to the IMC itself. I do not know what it is on the Haswell microarchitecture but on my 3960x I have it set to 1.15 volts which is slightly above its default. I would not exceed 1.2 volts on the IMC and even this much should not be necessary but if I recall correctly 1.4 volts is the absolute safe maximum.

Finally, the PLL which generates the DRAM controller clock and IO bus reference clock (it'll be 1200Mhz for your DDR3-2400 modules) may require a slight boost of about 0.1 volts.

You may want to get a second opinion on the voltage levels for the IMC and PLL from someone who owns a Haswell microprocessor.

All of this will add a small thermal footprint. Not enough to worry about though.

As I mentioned above, caution is paramount when overclocking. Damage is rare, especially when playing with only the DRAM, but you wouldn't want to end up with an Intel i5-4570PE (Paperweight Edition).


What is Paperweight edition ? :p 

So whats my choices here? Should I buy another CPU alone than can handle it, or maybe the problem is the haswell itself...? If I take a look at the i7-4570K (which would be my choice) it is still rated at 1600mhz from intel.

I think my problem is my RAM, I should look into a 1600mhz memory with lower latency timing. I dont know how to calculate that though, I would like to get 1600mhz ram that would be the same speed of my 2400 with higher timing...


tridents lateny timings are technically slower then most 1600mhz memory

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

7 8 8 8 24


Wow perfect. This is exactly what I just ordered. Those should be more friendly to install, and I could probably overclock them later on with XMP to about 1900's mhz?

m
0
l
a c 88 à CPUs
January 5, 2014 7:47:22 AM

maxthehax said:
beyondlogic said:
maxthehax said:
beyondlogic said:
maxthehax said:
beyondlogic said:

unlocked k due to it can occ
MAX: ?My i5-4570 is NOT unlocked. I never though it would require OC'ing my system to use higher frequency rated memory.
the others youd have to get the i5 4570 to occ to a way it can use the 2400
Max: Is there a way to overclock ONLY my memory to get my 1.65V 2400mhz? Is XMP made for that? Is my LOCKED i5-4570 haswell XMP ready?



thanks




ah that might be a problem the voltage

1.65v is not recomended for haswell or ivy bridge unless occing intel recomends 1.5v

and speed the board may accept 2400mhz memory and cpu may use it or it may downclock it to 1600mhz
and may downclock voltage to make it support the processor


Max: Can I OverClock my memory voltage to 1.65V even with a locked cpu model, are they related? The board is a ASUS Maximus 6 Formula with the ROG armor LGA1150 Haswell, im pretty sure it could handle the OC. The board is also rated for more than 2400 memory.

XMP claim to be able to OC DDR3 up to 3,000mhz, that should do the trick to get up to 2400?

I don't see any specs telling me that my i5-4570 is XMP ready...

Thanks


maxthehax said:
Pinhedd said:


The motherboard will handle it, the DRAM will handle it, but it is not guaranteed that the CPU will handle it. DDR3 is far more forgiving than DDR2 but anything above DDR3-2133 can be a bit hit and miss. Fortunately Intel's integrated memory controller is extremely robust.

The part that you may have to play around with a bit is the IMC or Integrated Memory Controller. 1.5 volts is the recommended DRAM supply voltage when stability is the primary consideration with standard 5% tolerance for an absolute maximum of 1.575 volts. When stability is not a primary concern the maximum supply voltage per Intel's IMC spec is somewhere around 1.8 volts and per JEDEC's DDR3 spec is around 1.9 volts. I've never seen modules require more than 1.65 volts though and I've been running that in my desktop for two years without issue. Keep in mind though that you shouldn't expect datacenter levels of stability here, your system may run Prime95/Memtest for a week without issue and then crash randomly. That's just a risk of running high speed memory; bit error rates are exponentially higher.

With that said, the additional stress that DDR3-2400 places on the IMC over its tested DDR3-1600 may necessitate increasing the supply voltage to the IMC itself. I do not know what it is on the Haswell microarchitecture but on my 3960x I have it set to 1.15 volts which is slightly above its default. I would not exceed 1.2 volts on the IMC and even this much should not be necessary but if I recall correctly 1.4 volts is the absolute safe maximum.

Finally, the PLL which generates the DRAM controller clock and IO bus reference clock (it'll be 1200Mhz for your DDR3-2400 modules) may require a slight boost of about 0.1 volts.

You may want to get a second opinion on the voltage levels for the IMC and PLL from someone who owns a Haswell microprocessor.

All of this will add a small thermal footprint. Not enough to worry about though.

As I mentioned above, caution is paramount when overclocking. Damage is rare, especially when playing with only the DRAM, but you wouldn't want to end up with an Intel i5-4570PE (Paperweight Edition).


What is Paperweight edition ? :p 

So whats my choices here? Should I buy another CPU alone than can handle it, or maybe the problem is the haswell itself...? If I take a look at the i7-4570K (which would be my choice) it is still rated at 1600mhz from intel.

I think my problem is my RAM, I should look into a 1600mhz memory with lower latency timing. I dont know how to calculate that though, I would like to get 1600mhz ram that would be the same speed of my 2400 with higher timing...


tridents lateny timings are technically slower then most 1600mhz memory

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

7 8 8 8 24


Wow perfect. This is exactly what I just ordered. Those should be more friendly to install, and I could probably overclock them later on with XMP to about 1900's mhz?



i really wouldnt overclock them theres no real need and occing ram is never advised all you will do is shorten the life of your ram or kill the ram slots

those rams will not downclock from 1600mhz due to the 1.5v

plus anything under 7 latency your not going to see any diffrence and speeding up the ram past 1600mhz yields very little results in gaming a few frames at best.
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January 5, 2014 8:51:11 AM

Alright, thanks to you two, that answer all my questions and now that I have the right setup I will be more confident with the install.

I simply didn't know Haswell 4th gen CPU where made to be used with 1.5V 1600mhz ddr3
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a c 169 à CPUs
a c 128 } Memory
January 5, 2014 12:23:17 PM

beyondlogic said:
maxthehax said:
beyondlogic said:
maxthehax said:
beyondlogic said:

unlocked k due to it can occ
MAX: ?My i5-4570 is NOT unlocked. I never though it would require OC'ing my system to use higher frequency rated memory.
the others youd have to get the i5 4570 to occ to a way it can use the 2400
Max: Is there a way to overclock ONLY my memory to get my 1.65V 2400mhz? Is XMP made for that? Is my LOCKED i5-4570 haswell XMP ready?



thanks




ah that might be a problem the voltage

1.65v is not recomended for haswell or ivy bridge unless occing intel recomends 1.5v

and speed the board may accept 2400mhz memory and cpu may use it or it may downclock it to 1600mhz
and may downclock voltage to make it support the processor


Max: Can I OverClock my memory voltage to 1.65V even with a locked cpu model, are they related? The board is a ASUS Maximus 6 Formula with the ROG armor LGA1150 Haswell, im pretty sure it could handle the OC. The board is also rated for more than 2400 memory.

XMP claim to be able to OC DDR3 up to 3,000mhz, that should do the trick to get up to 2400?

I don't see any specs telling me that my i5-4570 is XMP ready...

Thanks


maxthehax said:
Pinhedd said:


The motherboard will handle it, the DRAM will handle it, but it is not guaranteed that the CPU will handle it. DDR3 is far more forgiving than DDR2 but anything above DDR3-2133 can be a bit hit and miss. Fortunately Intel's integrated memory controller is extremely robust.

The part that you may have to play around with a bit is the IMC or Integrated Memory Controller. 1.5 volts is the recommended DRAM supply voltage when stability is the primary consideration with standard 5% tolerance for an absolute maximum of 1.575 volts. When stability is not a primary concern the maximum supply voltage per Intel's IMC spec is somewhere around 1.8 volts and per JEDEC's DDR3 spec is around 1.9 volts. I've never seen modules require more than 1.65 volts though and I've been running that in my desktop for two years without issue. Keep in mind though that you shouldn't expect datacenter levels of stability here, your system may run Prime95/Memtest for a week without issue and then crash randomly. That's just a risk of running high speed memory; bit error rates are exponentially higher.

With that said, the additional stress that DDR3-2400 places on the IMC over its tested DDR3-1600 may necessitate increasing the supply voltage to the IMC itself. I do not know what it is on the Haswell microarchitecture but on my 3960x I have it set to 1.15 volts which is slightly above its default. I would not exceed 1.2 volts on the IMC and even this much should not be necessary but if I recall correctly 1.4 volts is the absolute safe maximum.

Finally, the PLL which generates the DRAM controller clock and IO bus reference clock (it'll be 1200Mhz for your DDR3-2400 modules) may require a slight boost of about 0.1 volts.

You may want to get a second opinion on the voltage levels for the IMC and PLL from someone who owns a Haswell microprocessor.

All of this will add a small thermal footprint. Not enough to worry about though.

As I mentioned above, caution is paramount when overclocking. Damage is rare, especially when playing with only the DRAM, but you wouldn't want to end up with an Intel i5-4570PE (Paperweight Edition).


What is Paperweight edition ? :p 

So whats my choices here? Should I buy another CPU alone than can handle it, or maybe the problem is the haswell itself...? If I take a look at the i7-4570K (which would be my choice) it is still rated at 1600mhz from intel.

I think my problem is my RAM, I should look into a 1600mhz memory with lower latency timing. I dont know how to calculate that though, I would like to get 1600mhz ram that would be the same speed of my 2400 with higher timing...


tridents lateny timings are technically slower then most 1600mhz memory

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

7 8 8 8 24


This is just plain wrong.

Memory timings are measured in IO bus clock cycles whereas DRAM latency is measured in nanoseconds. Jack up the IO bus clock without changing the module itself and the latency will stay more or less the same but the timings will have to be relaxed in order to ensure that the memory controller doesn't try to read data from a bank before it's ready. The IO bus is spatially multiplexed across 8 independent memory banks on each DRAM module so an increased bus clock gives the memory controller significantly more timeslots to work with within the same period. Column operations on a DDR3-1600 module with CL 7 will complete the first word within 8.75 nanoseconds based on a 7 cycle delay relative to an 800Mhz IO bus and will perform up to 800 million column operations per second. Column operations on a DDR3-2400 with CL 10 will complete the first word within 8.3 nanoseconds based on a 10 cycle delay relative to a 1200Mhz IO bus and will perform up to 1.2 billion column operations per second.

The more you know!

maxthehax said:
Alright, thanks to you two, that answer all my questions and now that I have the right setup I will be more confident with the install.

I simply didn't know Haswell 4th gen CPU where made to be used with 1.5V 1600mhz ddr3


That's the highest JEDEC standard that the memory controller has been tested against for a certain level of stability. It was designed to go much higher, it's just not guaranteed to work at those speeds or to maintain an extreme level of stability. Intel designed the XMP specification to ease the installation and configuration of high speed memory and only allows the XMP trademark to be used by modules that have passed through a qualification process.
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January 7, 2014 4:12:44 AM

Thanks to Pinhedd. Big chance I will end up ordering 1.65V 2133mhz memory. Even if I already bought 1600 sticks, I will keep them as spare if I encounter any problem. I know the difference will be very little, but this is my second build and I really wish to get every little extra if I can.

Thanks!
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a c 169 à CPUs
a c 128 } Memory
January 7, 2014 4:25:14 AM

maxthehax said:
Thanks to Pinhedd. Big chance I will end up ordering 1.65V 2133mhz memory. Even if I already bought 1600 sticks, I will keep them as spare if I encounter any problem. I know the difference will be very little, but this is my second build and I really wish to get every little extra if I can.

Thanks!


You're welcome
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January 23, 2014 4:39:25 PM

PC is now complete and running with 16GB of 1.65V 2133mhz memory. It was very easy, a real joke, I simply activated XMP profile to get the right numbers.

The PC runs flawlessly, I love the setup!

Thanks again for all the help
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