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changing letters assigned to boot drives

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January 5, 2014 7:34:44 PM

Hi so I want to add an ssd drive to my computer along with my hdd. The ssd is gonna be my boot drive. I am also gonna leave the operating system on the hdd in case the ssd crashes. Will it affect anything if i change the letter for my hdd to D: and put my ssd as C:
a c 884 G Storage
January 5, 2014 7:39:55 PM

arich1055077 said:
Hi so I want to add an ssd drive to my computer along with my hdd. The ssd is gonna be my boot drive. I am also gonna leave the operating system on the hdd in case the ssd crashes. Will it affect anything if i change the letter for my hdd to D: and put my ssd as C:


1. You don't really need the old OS on the HDD. The SSD is not likely to 'crash'.
2. Installing the new OS on the SSD, when you boot from the SSD....that will be C. No need to 'change' anything. Other connected drives will get other drive letters. Your current HDD might be D, for instance.

It is wise to have a backup image of the initial install elsewhere, in the rare case you need to recover it. But not as an installed, ready to go Windows installation. An 'image', using any of the current imaging applications.
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a b G Storage
January 5, 2014 7:43:00 PM

why don't you pull the HD. install the SSD and install the operating system on it, do updates/drivers, etc., after that's done you can reboot, hot swap the hd and format it from the desktop.
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January 5, 2014 7:54:08 PM

USAFRet said:
arich1055077 said:
Hi so I want to add an ssd drive to my computer along with my hdd. The ssd is gonna be my boot drive. I am also gonna leave the operating system on the hdd in case the ssd crashes. Will it affect anything if i change the letter for my hdd to D: and put my ssd as C:


1. You don't really need the old OS on the HDD. The SSD is not likely to 'crash'.
2. Installing the new OS on the SSD, when you boot from the SSD....that will be C. No need to 'change' anything. Other connected drives will get other drive letters. Your current HDD might be D, for instance.

It is wise to have a backup image of the initial install elsewhere, in the rare case you need to recover it. But not as an installed, ready to go Windows installation. An 'image', using any of the current imaging applications.


how would I get rid of the os on the hdd? so it will automaticly set the new boot drive as C: even though it put the hdd as C: previously?
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a b G Storage
January 5, 2014 7:59:26 PM

read the last part of what I said above.
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January 5, 2014 8:05:42 PM

swifty_morgan said:
read the last part of what I said above.


what about removing os from hdd
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a c 884 G Storage
January 5, 2014 8:05:48 PM

arich1055077 said:
USAFRet said:
arich1055077 said:
Hi so I want to add an ssd drive to my computer along with my hdd. The ssd is gonna be my boot drive. I am also gonna leave the operating system on the hdd in case the ssd crashes. Will it affect anything if i change the letter for my hdd to D: and put my ssd as C:


1. You don't really need the old OS on the HDD. The SSD is not likely to 'crash'.
2. Installing the new OS on the SSD, when you boot from the SSD....that will be C. No need to 'change' anything. Other connected drives will get other drive letters. Your current HDD might be D, for instance.

It is wise to have a backup image of the initial install elsewhere, in the rare case you need to recover it. But not as an installed, ready to go Windows installation. An 'image', using any of the current imaging applications.


how would I get rid of the os on the hdd? so it will automaticly set the new boot drive as C: even though it put the hdd as C: previously?


Given a normal installation, the boot drive will be C. No matter what the other drive or OS may think it used to be.

Even though Windows also lives on that HDD, and it thinks it should be C...it isn't. The OS on SSD is the boss, and hands out drive letters as it sees fit. That HDD will be something other than C. Probably D

So, to install on the new SSD:

Disconnect all other drives
Connect the SSD (and do all the other stuff - AHCI mode in the BIOS, etc)
Install Windows
Install Windows updates
Onec everything is verified working, change the boot order to be SSD first, then DVD. Nothing else
Now connect the HDD
If you have any critical data on that HDD, copy it elsewhere. Now you can delete all partitions on that drive, reformat, and then it is a blank slate.
Install your applications where you want. Some on the SSD, some on the HDD. During install of each aplication, choose Custom or Advanced. This will allow you to put each application on whichever drive you desire.

Given a 120GB or larger SSD, probably most of your applications can be installed on it, apart from games. They generally take up a lot of space. So put them on the HDD.
If you're using Steam, you can designate multiple target locations in the client settings.
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a b G Storage
January 6, 2014 10:40:45 AM
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