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My overclocked i5-4670 @4.4ghz runs for 8 hours in stress test, no problem, but crashes in game (temps never higher than 60 C)

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January 6, 2014 9:08:27 PM

UPDATE: reset cmos and it appears that the overclock is now working (dont have to change the turbo settings anymore). Running stress tests again for ~8 hours and I will report back if it crashes in game.


Basically like the question states. Ive been wresting with this for the past month and its really getting on my nerves. It runs great in stress testing, but once im in game it crashes. No idea whats up, and would really like some help!

specs
intel i5 4670 @3.4(stock)
gigabyte Gigabyte Z87 LGA 1150
gtx 760 superclocked
8 gigs of ram
750 W PSU (i believe coolermaster)

Here are my current bios settings:
CPU base clock 100.00 mhz
cpu clock ratio 44
turbo boost tech - auto (all turbo ratios at 44)
hyperthreading disabled
c1e,c3,c6/7, and eist all off

CPU LLC at extreme
CPU E override at 1.8v
vcore at 1.265v
cpu ring voltage at 1.2v

I would really appreciate some help as it is extremely frustrating to have a stable clock in stress tests, but not in game. Thanks in advance!

Wanted to add one oddity to this post. The reason i have the turbo boost on 44 is because when i change just the multiplier (say to 44), it doesn't take effect when I save and exit the BIOS. Example: in the bios I change just the CPU Multiplier to 44. When i save and quit, it boots up and cpu-z says its still at 3.4 ghz even under load. All the voltages change when I change them in BIOS, but not the multiplier unless i change them in the turbo section.

More about : overclocked 4670 4ghz runs hours stress test problem crashes game temps higher

a b K Overclocking
a c 157 à CPUs
January 8, 2014 9:25:01 AM

What are your CPU and GPU temps at idle and loaded?

Also, is your BIOS up to date? Same question for the motherboard chipset and video drivers.
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January 8, 2014 10:56:41 AM

COLGeek said:
What are your CPU and GPU temps at idle and loaded?

Also, is your BIOS up to date? Same question for the motherboard chipset and video drivers.


All drivers and bios are up to date as of 3 days ago (i guess i could look again). Idle temps for the CPU are around 35-40 but the average is 36 C. Load temp averages are 60-65C and GPU temps are still all normal.

100% sure its something to do with the CPU as when i load the BIOS defaults, I have no issues at all.
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a b K Overclocking
a c 157 à CPUs
January 8, 2014 11:00:27 AM

Do you have a straight i5-4670 or the unlocked i5-4670k?
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January 8, 2014 11:16:45 AM

COLGeek said:
Do you have a straight i5-4670 or the unlocked i5-4670k?



Ah yes forgot to put that K in there. Yes I do have the 4670K
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a c 157 à CPUs
January 8, 2014 2:08:39 PM

Have you tested your memory? What speed is it running?
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January 8, 2014 3:00:14 PM

What model MOBO do you have? What "stress test" program are you running? If you tell me AIDA 64, there's your problem right there. I ran a 12 hour AIDA test and games would crash left and right. I recommend PRIME95 Large FFT and nothing else.

If you can get Prime95 stable under good temps similar to what you mention above, next step is check your Windows Event Logger for WHEA errors. If you have WHEA errors, add voltage or decrease clock or both until they go away.

My experience is with Ivy Bridge FYI but they appear very similar... I give you these suggestions assuming that you know how to adjust BIOS and overclock safely relative to voltages and temperatures.. Please don't blame us if you burn something up ;) 
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January 8, 2014 10:46:27 PM

Adroid said:
What model MOBO do you have? What "stress test" program are you running? If you tell me AIDA 64, there's your problem right there. I ran a 12 hour AIDA test and games would crash left and right. I recommend PRIME95 Large FFT and nothing else.

If you can get Prime95 stable under good temps similar to what you mention above, next step is check your Windows Event Logger for WHEA errors. If you have WHEA errors, add voltage or decrease clock or both until they go away.

My experience is with Ivy Bridge FYI but they appear very similar... I give you these suggestions assuming that you know how to adjust BIOS and overclock safely relative to voltages and temperatures.. Please don't blame us if you burn something up ;) 


I appreciate the advice. my mobo is Gigabyte Z87 LGA 1150 CrossFireX HDMI DVI ATX Motherboard (GA-Z87-D3HP). And yeah, i was using AIDA :<. Ill try some stress tests with Prime and go from there and report back after I try some things out. However, I have no idea what WHEA loggers are or how to find/interpret them.

And dont worry, i have a good bit of OCing experience. I knocked down the clock to 4.2 ghz to try on the first test and left the voltages the same. started Prime and temps are in the 60-70C range as of now. Letting it run overnight and will report after the 12 hour mark and after some gaming.
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January 8, 2014 11:07:17 PM

COLGeek said:
Have you tested your memory? What speed is it running?


I havent ever tested the memory, but its running at 1333 i believe

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January 8, 2014 11:28:35 PM

As it turns out, the way haswell is built, prime 95 is not supposed to be used. Aida or whatever is supposed to be tailored to the haswell framework
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January 9, 2014 3:39:55 AM

Have you tried disabling turbo and then a higher multiplier?
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January 9, 2014 5:31:36 AM

whalio said:
Have you tried disabling turbo and then a higher multiplier?


Does that actually increase the stability of an overclocked cpu? Never really thought of doing that
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January 9, 2014 5:40:19 AM

Clown DO said:
As it turns out, the way haswell is built, prime 95 is not supposed to be used. Aida or whatever is supposed to be tailored to the haswell framework


Who gave you this information? If it was the video with some Aida pushing ASUS employees, I disagree.
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January 9, 2014 5:44:42 AM

Clown DO said:
Adroid said:
What model MOBO do you have? What "stress test" program are you running? If you tell me AIDA 64, there's your problem right there. I ran a 12 hour AIDA test and games would crash left and right. I recommend PRIME95 Large FFT and nothing else.

If you can get Prime95 stable under good temps similar to what you mention above, next step is check your Windows Event Logger for WHEA errors. If you have WHEA errors, add voltage or decrease clock or both until they go away.

My experience is with Ivy Bridge FYI but they appear very similar... I give you these suggestions assuming that you know how to adjust BIOS and overclock safely relative to voltages and temperatures.. Please don't blame us if you burn something up ;) 


I appreciate the advice. my mobo is Gigabyte Z87 LGA 1150 CrossFireX HDMI DVI ATX Motherboard (GA-Z87-D3HP). And yeah, i was using AIDA :<. Ill try some stress tests with Prime and go from there and report back after I try some things out. However, I have no idea what WHEA loggers are or how to find/interpret them.

And dont worry, i have a good bit of OCing experience. I knocked down the clock to 4.2 ghz to try on the first test and left the voltages the same. started Prime and temps are in the 60-70C range as of now. Letting it run overnight and will report after the 12 hour mark and after some gaming.


Go to Windows Search and type in Event Viewer => Custom Views => Administrative Events. When you crash you will see related CPU errors here. Adjust voltages/clock speed until they go away.

After a 12 hour AIDA test my PC instacrashed when gaming. Once I Prime95 tested and added voltage until WHEA errors went away I haven't had a crash yet due to system instability.
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January 9, 2014 6:10:37 AM

Adroid said:
Clown DO said:
Adroid said:
What model MOBO do you have? What "stress test" program are you running? If you tell me AIDA 64, there's your problem right there. I ran a 12 hour AIDA test and games would crash left and right. I recommend PRIME95 Large FFT and nothing else.

If you can get Prime95 stable under good temps similar to what you mention above, next step is check your Windows Event Logger for WHEA errors. If you have WHEA errors, add voltage or decrease clock or both until they go away.

My experience is with Ivy Bridge FYI but they appear very similar... I give you these suggestions assuming that you know how to adjust BIOS and overclock safely relative to voltages and temperatures.. Please don't blame us if you burn something up ;) 


I appreciate the advice. my mobo is Gigabyte Z87 LGA 1150 CrossFireX HDMI DVI ATX Motherboard (GA-Z87-D3HP). And yeah, i was using AIDA :<. Ill try some stress tests with Prime and go from there and report back after I try some things out. However, I have no idea what WHEA loggers are or how to find/interpret them.

And dont worry, i have a good bit of OCing experience. I knocked down the clock to 4.2 ghz to try on the first test and left the voltages the same. started Prime and temps are in the 60-70C range as of now. Letting it run overnight and will report after the 12 hour mark and after some gaming.


Go to Windows Search and type in Event Viewer => Custom Views => Administrative Events. When you crash you will see related CPU errors here. Adjust voltages/clock speed until they go away.

After a 12 hour AIDA test my PC instacrashed when gaming. Once I Prime95 tested and added voltage until WHEA errors went away I haven't had a crash yet due to system instability.


Hmm. well i ran the prime 95, but within like 10 min it was hitting temps of like 80 C which was giving me ulcers watching. I wasn't sure if that was safe so I went ahead and canceled the test. I don't really know the specific temps for haswell so I'm a little conservative as far as those 80C numbers are concerned.

Aslo, are these WHEA errors codes like bsods or do they actually tell me whats going on?
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a c 157 à CPUs
January 9, 2014 6:26:25 AM

What heatsink (make/model) is mounted to your CPU?

Also, you should run memtest to verify the functionality of your RAM. Get it here:

http://www.memtest.org/

Burn the ISO to CD and then boot from that CD. Pretty much automatic from there.
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January 9, 2014 6:44:58 AM

If you install Core Temp, I believe it will show your TJMAX.

I personally tried to keep my 3570K under 85° when stress testing, knowing that under normal gaming load conditions your temps won't get that hot. So after a one time 12 hour prime test where temps got to 85°ish, my temperatures rarely go over 65° during normal load, which is tolerable. My CPU idles around 30°.

I'm not telling you to do the same thing, as it's really a personal preference of how hard and how much risk you want to take with your CPU.

I also believe Intel offers a one-time replacement insurance for around 25$ if you burn up your chip if you are worried about it (you probably have to buy the insurance before burning up the chip). They offer this largely because few chips actually burn up - it's a money maker for them.

These temperatures are from the new technology in part, and partly due to the fact that Intel went to using a thermal paste instead of fluxless solder - which is really annoying for the overclocking world.

Your other option is to clock down a little, or increase voltage a little to see if the WHEA errors continue and/or you crash during games (always keeping an eye on temperatures of course).

After my reading, I see alot of people hitting 80-90° during stress testing. Truth is the new Intel chips run HOT, period. Again, it's up to you how hard to push your chip, and I am not trying to talk you into pushing it farther than you are happy with, but I will say that AIDA is not a good stress test program from my personal experience.
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January 9, 2014 7:03:01 AM

Adroid said:
If you install Core Temp, I believe it will show your TJMAX.

I personally tried to keep my 3570K under 85° when stress testing, knowing that under normal gaming load conditions your temps won't get that hot. So after a one time 12 hour prime test where temps got to 85°ish, my temperatures rarely go over 65° during normal load, which is tolerable. My CPU idles around 30°.

I'm not telling you to do the same thing, as it's really a personal preference of how hard and how much risk you want to take with your CPU.

I also believe Intel offers a one-time replacement insurance for around 25$ if you burn up your chip if you are worried about it (you probably have to buy the insurance before burning up the chip). They offer this largely because few chips actually burn up - it's a money maker for them.

These temperatures are from the new technology in part, and partly due to the fact that Intel went to using a thermal paste instead of fluxless solder - which is really annoying for the overclocking world.

Your other option is to clock down a little, or increase voltage a little to see if the WHEA errors continue and/or you crash during games (always keeping an eye on temperatures of course).

After my reading, I see alot of people hitting 80-90° during stress testing. Truth is the new Intel chips run HOT, period. Again, it's up to you how hard to push your chip, and I am not trying to talk you into pushing it farther than you are happy with, but I will say that AIDA is not a good stress test program from my personal experience.


Thats fair. I have already purchased the $25 thing, so I'm covered in that department, I have no idea how to use it, but I have it! I think that I will run the prime if the reduction in clock speed doesn't stabilize it. At this point its a matter of pride. I paid the extra money to overclock and I havent had issues with previous processors, so Im going to get this to work!

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a b à CPUs
January 9, 2014 7:09:05 AM

Clown DO said:
Adroid said:
If you install Core Temp, I believe it will show your TJMAX.

I personally tried to keep my 3570K under 85° when stress testing, knowing that under normal gaming load conditions your temps won't get that hot. So after a one time 12 hour prime test where temps got to 85°ish, my temperatures rarely go over 65° during normal load, which is tolerable. My CPU idles around 30°.

I'm not telling you to do the same thing, as it's really a personal preference of how hard and how much risk you want to take with your CPU.

I also believe Intel offers a one-time replacement insurance for around 25$ if you burn up your chip if you are worried about it (you probably have to buy the insurance before burning up the chip). They offer this largely because few chips actually burn up - it's a money maker for them.

These temperatures are from the new technology in part, and partly due to the fact that Intel went to using a thermal paste instead of fluxless solder - which is really annoying for the overclocking world.

Your other option is to clock down a little, or increase voltage a little to see if the WHEA errors continue and/or you crash during games (always keeping an eye on temperatures of course).

After my reading, I see alot of people hitting 80-90° during stress testing. Truth is the new Intel chips run HOT, period. Again, it's up to you how hard to push your chip, and I am not trying to talk you into pushing it farther than you are happy with, but I will say that AIDA is not a good stress test program from my personal experience.


Thats fair. I have already purchased the $25 thing, so I'm covered in that department, I have no idea how to use it, but I have it! I think that I will run the prime if the reduction in clock speed doesn't stabilize it. At this point its a matter of pride. I paid the extra money to overclock and I havent had issues with previous processors, so Im going to get this to work!



Haha I ended up with the same conclusion. I was frustrated that temps were so hot and it felt like a waste of time to have a "K" version CPU and not overclock it!

That said, I pushed my CPU to around 87° while testing, and decided if it burns up, screw it. After all said and done I ended up with a very solid stable overclock at 4.3GHZ with no WHEA errors. CPU is chugging along at 30°, rarely going over 60-65° when gaming. The system is smoking fast, and I can live with that!
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January 10, 2014 11:07:04 PM

Adroid said:
Clown DO said:
Adroid said:
If you install Core Temp, I believe it will show your TJMAX.

I personally tried to keep my 3570K under 85° when stress testing, knowing that under normal gaming load conditions your temps won't get that hot. So after a one time 12 hour prime test where temps got to 85°ish, my temperatures rarely go over 65° during normal load, which is tolerable. My CPU idles around 30°.

I'm not telling you to do the same thing, as it's really a personal preference of how hard and how much risk you want to take with your CPU.

I also believe Intel offers a one-time replacement insurance for around 25$ if you burn up your chip if you are worried about it (you probably have to buy the insurance before burning up the chip). They offer this largely because few chips actually burn up - it's a money maker for them.

These temperatures are from the new technology in part, and partly due to the fact that Intel went to using a thermal paste instead of fluxless solder - which is really annoying for the overclocking world.

Your other option is to clock down a little, or increase voltage a little to see if the WHEA errors continue and/or you crash during games (always keeping an eye on temperatures of course).

After my reading, I see alot of people hitting 80-90° during stress testing. Truth is the new Intel chips run HOT, period. Again, it's up to you how hard to push your chip, and I am not trying to talk you into pushing it farther than you are happy with, but I will say that AIDA is not a good stress test program from my personal experience.


Thats fair. I have already purchased the $25 thing, so I'm covered in that department, I have no idea how to use it, but I have it! I think that I will run the prime if the reduction in clock speed doesn't stabilize it. At this point its a matter of pride. I paid the extra money to overclock and I havent had issues with previous processors, so Im going to get this to work!



Haha I ended up with the same conclusion. I was frustrated that temps were so hot and it felt like a waste of time to have a "K" version CPU and not overclock it!

That said, I pushed my CPU to around 87° while testing, and decided if it burns up, screw it. After all said and done I ended up with a very solid stable overclock at 4.3GHZ with no WHEA errors. CPU is chugging along at 30°, rarely going over 60-65° when gaming. The system is smoking fast, and I can live with that!


Well, it appears stable now at 4.2Ghz. i might try to bump it up by .1 in the future, but im pretty happy with the speed now. thanks for the help everyone!

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Best solution

a b K Overclocking
a b à CPUs
January 10, 2014 11:30:16 PM

Clown DO said:
Adroid said:
Clown DO said:
Adroid said:
If you install Core Temp, I believe it will show your TJMAX.

I personally tried to keep my 3570K under 85° when stress testing, knowing that under normal gaming load conditions your temps won't get that hot. So after a one time 12 hour prime test where temps got to 85°ish, my temperatures rarely go over 65° during normal load, which is tolerable. My CPU idles around 30°.

I'm not telling you to do the same thing, as it's really a personal preference of how hard and how much risk you want to take with your CPU.

I also believe Intel offers a one-time replacement insurance for around 25$ if you burn up your chip if you are worried about it (you probably have to buy the insurance before burning up the chip). They offer this largely because few chips actually burn up - it's a money maker for them.

These temperatures are from the new technology in part, and partly due to the fact that Intel went to using a thermal paste instead of fluxless solder - which is really annoying for the overclocking world.

Your other option is to clock down a little, or increase voltage a little to see if the WHEA errors continue and/or you crash during games (always keeping an eye on temperatures of course).

After my reading, I see alot of people hitting 80-90° during stress testing. Truth is the new Intel chips run HOT, period. Again, it's up to you how hard to push your chip, and I am not trying to talk you into pushing it farther than you are happy with, but I will say that AIDA is not a good stress test program from my personal experience.


Thats fair. I have already purchased the $25 thing, so I'm covered in that department, I have no idea how to use it, but I have it! I think that I will run the prime if the reduction in clock speed doesn't stabilize it. At this point its a matter of pride. I paid the extra money to overclock and I havent had issues with previous processors, so Im going to get this to work!



Haha I ended up with the same conclusion. I was frustrated that temps were so hot and it felt like a waste of time to have a "K" version CPU and not overclock it!

That said, I pushed my CPU to around 87° while testing, and decided if it burns up, screw it. After all said and done I ended up with a very solid stable overclock at 4.3GHZ with no WHEA errors. CPU is chugging along at 30°, rarely going over 60-65° when gaming. The system is smoking fast, and I can live with that!


Well, it appears stable now at 4.2Ghz. i might try to bump it up by .1 in the future, but im pretty happy with the speed now. thanks for the help everyone!



If your chip is happy at 4.2, leave it there imo. It's not worth pushing it super hard for another 100-300 MHZ, because the performance gains aren't worth it if your voltages and temperatures will be higher than what you are comfortable with. Mine is happy at 4.3, and it's plenty fast.

Truth be told for gaming I don't think an extra 200 mhz will make that much of a difference within the same architecture.
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