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Is this spec okay for 3ds max - university student for architecture

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Last response: in Systems
January 9, 2014 8:43:08 AM

hi there,

I have com across this website http://pcspecialist.co.uk/computers/intel-home-office-p.... I have been advice that it is much cheaper to build my own computer but i have no clue how to do it.

CPU: intel core i7 quad core i7-4770 3.4 GHz
Motherboard: Asus H81M-E : Micro-ATX , LG1150 USB 3.0 SATA 6GBS
Memory: 8GB KINGSTON DUAL -DDR3 16000MHz
Storage: 1TB 3.5" SATA-III 6GB/s HDD 7200RPM 32MB
Video Card: 2GB NVIDIA GEFORE GTX 650

works out roughly £657.00 and my budget is £ 650 roughly

I was wondering of this specification are okay for 3ds max, since i am tight on budget and really dont know how to dissemble my own desktop.

plus does anyone come across this website or have ordered from this place at all?

thanks in advance

More about : spec 3ds max university student architecture

January 9, 2014 9:41:26 AM

Recommendation: NO.
If you're using the latest versions of the suite 2013 and 2014 there is no support for consumer graphics cards as accelerators, only workstation cards.
The GTX 650 will offer you no GPU advantage, you could go with a cheaper option.
That i7 should be nice, Hyper-Threading will give you a decent advantage, Maxing out your Memory [RAM] (GB's) will be important to you 8Gb is fine.
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January 9, 2014 9:47:38 AM

c3h8 said:
Recommendation: NO.
If you're using the latest versions of the suite 2013 and 2014 there is no support for consumer graphics cards as accelerators, only workstation cards.
The GTX 650 will offer you no GPU advantage, you could go with a cheaper option.
That i7 should be nice, Hyper-Threading will give you a decent advantage, Maxing out your Memory [RAM] (GB's) will be important to you 8Gb is fine.


hi there

as i am very new to this and doesn't have much knowledge about spec i was wondering what do you mean "If you're using the latest versions of the suite 2013 and 2014 there is no support for consumer graphics cards as accelerators, only workstation cards." and what would you suggest since lots of people advice me on building my own but i not confident in doing so as i might end up screw it up

thank you very much for your help
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January 9, 2014 11:12:05 AM

1. Nvidia has two lines of graphics cards: the GeForce consumer line, and the Quadro workstation/enterprise line.
Likewise AMD has a similar set of cards: the Radeon consumer line, and the FirePro workstation line.

2. In the past few years (4 or 5, I think) there has been a growing trend in using graphics cards as additional processors. For certain workloads like databases, rendering, and mathematics the raw power of the GPU (5x or greater performance) can GREATLY improve performance. Unfortunately, due to quality concerns high-end software developers (like AutoDesk) have refused to take advantage of the potential boost offered by any non-workstation solution.
All of these types of cards will display video to your monitor, but if you want to use them as additional processor power you need the workstation cards.

3. Like most of the community here, I too recommend building your own machine. Most of the concern/learning curve is in matching specifications (ironically established to make our lives easier).

[Bearing in mind that I live in the states and have no grasp of British taxes], I’ll walk you through my theoretical build.
I. Choose a starting point, I like the processor-it’s often one of the most expensive parts you’ll purchase, and it dictates most of your specifications. From here we do a little research and find that rendering applications love multi-threading: more cores better. We find that the i7 series supports Hyper-threading which essentially doubles the number of cores (this is a gross over-simplification of Hyper-threading, but provides a correct approximation for making judgments.) Lastly we observe which models did best, e.g. i7-4770, FX-8350, i7-3770. Make notes and compare options
a. I7-4770: 84W, $309.99, Socket LGA 1150
b. I7-3770: 77W, $299.99, Socket LGA 1155
c. FX-8350: 125W, $199.99, Socket AM3+
The FX may be the cheapest, but it uses the most power-most will be pumped as heat, for the difference in power consumption I like the i7-3770
II. Now that I have a processor (CPU), I choose a motherboard. The CPU socket largely determines your selection. For this build we limit our searches to LGA 1155 boards. Choice should then be limited by desired features, 4 DIMM slots will allow for the most flexibility in RAM, and a PCI-Express x16 slot (2.0 or 3.0) will be needed. You’ll note that most boards include USB, Gigabit Ethernet, and sound build in. There will be performance differences caused by using different motherboards, but that variance is miniscule and often ignored. Price was my major concern, and ASRock has earned my loyalty as a brand, their products were solid, and the driver installation was excellent.
a. ASRock B75 PRO3-M LGA 1155…Micro ATX, was chosen at $64.99
i. Note the “Micro ATX” designates form-factor and is needed for choosing cases.
ii. Also Note the memory supported is DDR3 up-to 1600 (before Over Clocking)
III. Memory comes next- type, amount, and CAS latency are the major concerns. As this build uses standard DDR3 ram, we limit or search to such (DDR3 RAM for desktop has 240-Pins). Lower Latency is better, but better reviewed RAM is worth the trouble. Do not simply buy the cheap stuff. I opted for a 16GB (2x8GB) set: the 16GB is total amount (more is better), 2x8GB means there are two physical sticks at 8GB each. Having 4 DIMMS on your motherboard this leaves you the option to upgrade RAM later if you find yourself needing more.
a. G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 $159.99
[I apologize, I got bored, but the rest of the parts are essentially the same look-note-compare process]

LITE-ON DVD Burner - Bulk Black SATA Model iHAS124-04 – OEM
APEX SK-393-C Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
Seagate Pipeline HD ST1000VM002 1TB 5900 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive Bare Drive
EVGA 500 B 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified 500W Active PFC ATX12V v2.31/EPS 12V v2.91 3 Year Warranty 100-B1-0500-KR Power Supply ...
G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-1600C9D-16GXM
ASRock B75 PRO3-M LGA 1155 Intel B75 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Micro ATX Intel Motherboard
Intel Core i7-3770 Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.9GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 4000 BX80637I73770
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit – OEM
ATI 100-505682(100-505839) FirePro V5800 1GB 128-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.1 x16 CrossFire Supported Workstation Video Card
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January 9, 2014 11:34:20 AM

c3h8 said:

a. G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 $159.99
[I apologize, I got bored, but the rest of the parts are essentially the same look-note-compare process]

LITE-ON DVD Burner - Bulk Black SATA Model iHAS124-04 – OEM
APEX SK-393-C Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
Seagate Pipeline HD ST1000VM002 1TB 5900 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive Bare Drive
EVGA 500 B 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified 500W Active PFC ATX12V v2.31/EPS 12V v2.91 3 Year Warranty 100-B1-0500-KR Power Supply ...
G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-1600C9D-16GXM
ASRock B75 PRO3-M LGA 1155 Intel B75 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Micro ATX Intel Motherboard
Intel Core i7-3770 Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.9GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 4000 BX80637I73770
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit – OEM
ATI 100-505682(100-505839) FirePro V5800 1GB 128-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.1 x16 CrossFire Supported Workstation Video Card


Most of what you have is pretty good but I personally wouldn't pay that much for Ivy Bridge. And Apex cases are garbage, I wouldn't touch with a 10 foot pole.

OP - what is your max budget? You might want to get at least a GTX 660 or the aforementioned Fire Pro V5800 for rendering.
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January 9, 2014 11:48:43 AM

Fear the Mods. they are benevolent rulers...
@g-unit1111 Prices were based on current Newegg (I'm lazy), and yeah I'll agree Rosewill is about the only good brand in cheap cases I can think of.
Original budget was 650-Pounds, about 1057 USD. This build comes out ~$60 over, would appreciate savings without compromising graphics.
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January 9, 2014 1:51:44 PM

c3h8 said:
Fear the Mods. they are benevolent rulers...
@g-unit1111 Prices were based on current Newegg (I'm lazy), and yeah I'll agree Rosewill is about the only good brand in cheap cases I can think of.
Original budget was 650-Pounds, about 1057 USD. This build comes out ~$60 over, would appreciate savings without compromising graphics.


Considering that the OP is based in the UK then Newegg prices won't necessarily work. The UK equivalent of Newegg is called http://www.scan.co.uk or http://www.novatech.co.uk .

For the budget I would do something like this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor (£223.00 @ Amazon UK)
Motherboard: ASRock B85 Pro4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard (£69.98 @ Amazon UK)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-2133 Memory (£68.96 @ CCL Computers)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£43.99 @ Amazon UK)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 660 2GB Video Card (£147.77 @ Dabs)
Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case (£47.98 @ Amazon UK)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply (£70.35 @ Amazon UK)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer (£12.99 @ Amazon UK)
Total: £685.02
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-09 21:51 GMT+0000)
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January 9, 2014 2:32:20 PM

c3h8 said:
1. Nvidia has two lines of graphics cards: the GeForce consumer line, and the Quadro workstation/enterprise line.
Likewise AMD has a similar set of cards: the Radeon consumer line, and the FirePro workstation line.

2. In the past few years (4 or 5, I think) there has been a growing trend in using graphics cards as additional processors. For certain workloads like databases, rendering, and mathematics the raw power of the GPU (5x or greater performance) can GREATLY improve performance. Unfortunately, due to quality concerns high-end software developers (like AutoDesk) have refused to take advantage of the potential boost offered by any non-workstation solution.
All of these types of cards will display video to your monitor, but if you want to use them as additional processor power you need the workstation cards.

3. Like most of the community here, I too recommend building your own machine. Most of the concern/learning curve is in matching specifications (ironically established to make our lives easier).

[Bearing in mind that I live in the states and have no grasp of British taxes], I’ll walk you through my theoretical build.
I. Choose a starting point, I like the processor-it’s often one of the most expensive parts you’ll purchase, and it dictates most of your specifications. From here we do a little research and find that rendering applications love multi-threading: more cores better. We find that the i7 series supports Hyper-threading which essentially doubles the number of cores (this is a gross over-simplification of Hyper-threading, but provides a correct approximation for making judgments.) Lastly we observe which models did best, e.g. i7-4770, FX-8350, i7-3770. Make notes and compare options
a. I7-4770: 84W, $309.99, Socket LGA 1150
b. I7-3770: 77W, $299.99, Socket LGA 1155
c. FX-8350: 125W, $199.99, Socket AM3+
The FX may be the cheapest, but it uses the most power-most will be pumped as heat, for the difference in power consumption I like the i7-3770
II. Now that I have a processor (CPU), I choose a motherboard. The CPU socket largely determines your selection. For this build we limit our searches to LGA 1155 boards. Choice should then be limited by desired features, 4 DIMM slots will allow for the most flexibility in RAM, and a PCI-Express x16 slot (2.0 or 3.0) will be needed. You’ll note that most boards include USB, Gigabit Ethernet, and sound build in. There will be performance differences caused by using different motherboards, but that variance is miniscule and often ignored. Price was my major concern, and ASRock has earned my loyalty as a brand, their products were solid, and the driver installation was excellent.
a. ASRock B75 PRO3-M LGA 1155…Micro ATX, was chosen at $64.99
i. Note the “Micro ATX” designates form-factor and is needed for choosing cases.
ii. Also Note the memory supported is DDR3 up-to 1600 (before Over Clocking)
III. Memory comes next- type, amount, and CAS latency are the major concerns. As this build uses standard DDR3 ram, we limit or search to such (DDR3 RAM for desktop has 240-Pins). Lower Latency is better, but better reviewed RAM is worth the trouble. Do not simply buy the cheap stuff. I opted for a 16GB (2x8GB) set: the 16GB is total amount (more is better), 2x8GB means there are two physical sticks at 8GB each. Having 4 DIMMS on your motherboard this leaves you the option to upgrade RAM later if you find yourself needing more.
a. G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 $159.99
[I apologize, I got bored, but the rest of the parts are essentially the same look-note-compare process]

LITE-ON DVD Burner - Bulk Black SATA Model iHAS124-04 – OEM
APEX SK-393-C Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
Seagate Pipeline HD ST1000VM002 1TB 5900 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive Bare Drive
EVGA 500 B 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified 500W Active PFC ATX12V v2.31/EPS 12V v2.91 3 Year Warranty 100-B1-0500-KR Power Supply ...
G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-1600C9D-16GXM
ASRock B75 PRO3-M LGA 1155 Intel B75 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Micro ATX Intel Motherboard
Intel Core i7-3770 Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.9GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 4000 BX80637I73770
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit – OEM
ATI 100-505682(100-505839) FirePro V5800 1GB 128-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.1 x16 CrossFire Supported Workstation Video Card


woahhhhhh thank you very much for your help , you have enlighten me with so much information.
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January 9, 2014 2:50:36 PM

g-unit1111 said:
c3h8 said:
Fear the Mods. they are benevolent rulers...
@g-unit1111 Prices were based on current Newegg (I'm lazy), and yeah I'll agree Rosewill is about the only good brand in cheap cases I can think of.
Original budget was 650-Pounds, about 1057 USD. This build comes out ~$60 over, would appreciate savings without compromising graphics.


Considering that the OP is based in the UK then Newegg prices won't necessarily work. The UK equivalent of Newegg is called http://www.scan.co.uk or http://www.novatech.co.uk .

For the budget I would do something like this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor (£223.00 @ Amazon UK)
Motherboard: ASRock B85 Pro4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard (£69.98 @ Amazon UK)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-2133 Memory (£68.96 @ CCL Computers)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£43.99 @ Amazon UK)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 660 2GB Video Card (£147.77 @ Dabs)
Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case (£47.98 @ Amazon UK)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply (£70.35 @ Amazon UK)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer (£12.99 @ Amazon UK)
Total: £685.02
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-09 21:51 GMT+0000)


thank you for your suggestion, i was wondering what would you suggest for this with limited knowledge of assembling a desktop. Would you suggest that i maybe rely on a company to do it for me like http://www.pcspecialist.co.uk to assemble for me or should i try to do it myself? As i'm really scare that i might screw it all up and then end up costing more money which I don't have.

Would you spare a little time to have a look at http://www.pcspecialist.co.uk to see if it worth trying and if the parts you have suggest are there? My budget are no more than £ 600

sorry for all the trouble and thank your for the advice.
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January 9, 2014 4:52:26 PM

kt216 said:


thank you for your suggestion, i was wondering what would you suggest for this with limited knowledge of assembling a desktop. Would you suggest that i maybe rely on a company to do it for me like http://www.pcspecialist.co.uk to assemble for me or should i try to do it myself? As i'm really scare that i might screw it all up and then end up costing more money which I don't have.

Would you spare a little time to have a look at http://www.pcspecialist.co.uk to see if it worth trying and if the parts you have suggest are there? My budget are no more than £ 600

sorry for all the trouble and thank your for the advice.


Well you can always buy the parts and take it to a local tech shop and have them assemble it for you. I'm not in the UK, I'm in the US but what I've heard from most of the UK posters here is that Novatech will assemble a rig for you if you buy the parts and pay the assembly fee.
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