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Which Asus Z87 mobo for heavy data processing / statistics software workstation build?

About to do my next build and need help choosing my Asus Z87 mobo.

I am NOT a gamer. This will be my workstation for heavy statistical analysis (STATA multiprocessor, SAS), and productivity.

I will be going with the i7 4770k, and with 4 sticks of fast 8gb ram, and I will be using the integrated GPU.

I love Asus, and want to select a Z87 mobo, but the comparison specs are dizzying. What would be the best choice? I need speed.

Thanks!!!
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  1. Best answer
    I would use the Z87-A, I've done dozens of builds with them and they have everything that you need. You have no need for any of the bells and whistles that come with the other models. And buy your memory as a matched set of 4 x 8GB, preferably 1866 or higher.
  2. Yeah for what you will be using it, the Z87-A should do fine.
  3. Thanks. Two off-topic follow-ups:

    I will be running a 4-core version of STATA (econometrics software). STATA loads entire datasets into ram (if available). Then there is a lot of reading and writing of datasets to storage.

    1. Would installing a graphics card help with speed (i.e., by alleviating load on the CPU)?
    2. I can definitely see how ram speed is critical, and I will indeed go matched (I gravitate toward Corsair). But for read/writes, is SSD the way to go over HDD)? I always do SSD for OS, programs etc., but how fast would I destroy a SSD? Other options? Thunderbolt?

    Thanks again!
  4. A graphic card would really not help.

    An SSD is a good idea, and it will last a long long time. The larger the drive, the longer it lasts, I would opt for a 480/500GB. Thunderbolt will be of no use to you.
  5. I'd look to more DRAM and simply eliminate the reads and writes to disk, plus writes to SSDs are still their bane (much better than it used to be, but still can shorten the life of them). I'd look to 32GB of 2133 or so, there you gain the speed of the DRAM itself and also gain even more by eliminating the reads/writes
  6. Thanks. I'm still looking for the optimal ram kit. I had one bad experience with Gskil so have been using Corsair. Any specific recommendations?
  7. If you are looking for 8GB I would go with the CORSAIR Vengeance 2133 or 2400 like THIS or THIS, but I would try to get them on a sale.

    Like Tradesman1, I usually use 32GB, but my reason is that I run a lot of VMs. The price of ram is still pretty high, so unless you need it, I would go with 8GB or 16GB unless you see a real good sale on 32GB. I'm still trying to wear out my first SSD (an early X25-M that has around 250TB of writes and shows 100% life), it now lives as an Adobe Premiere scratch disk, so I don't worry much about SSD writes.
  8. Not sure what problems you had with GSkill, but on Z87 best I've found are the Tridents followed by the Snipers
  9. Tradesman1 said:
    Not sure what problems you had with GSkill, but on Z87 best I've found are the Tridents followed by the Snipers
    Yeah, I had that discussion a few months back regarding hard drives with a group that uses lots of drives, the problem with sampling bias. I've used many hundreds of sticks of G.Skill the last few years and had one bad stick, which was a shipping problem.
  10. Yep, with any componant or manufacturer, a bad one will get by (some manufacturers more than others) but I've been primarily using GSkill for around 5 years now with no problems
  11. I MUST have 32gb as I am doing statistical analysis of datasets that get close to that large and STATA loads the dataset into ram for processing. Can I get your votes on these four options:

    1. http://pcpartpicker.com/part/corsair-memory-cmz32gx3m4a2133c10
    2. http://pcpartpicker.com/part/gskill-memory-f32400c10q32gtx
    3. http://pcpartpicker.com/part/corsair-memory-cmd32gx3m4a2400c10
    4. http://pcpartpicker.com/part/gskill-memory-f319200cl10q32gbzhd

    Thanks.
  12. I would go with the G.Skill Trident DDR3-2400 that you linked as my first choice.
  13. Yep, the Tridents as mentioned in my earlier post are the best I've found
  14. Trademan1 and RealBeast... if you are still reading, another question:
    I'm finally getting around to doing this build using i7 4770K on a Asus Z87-A, with 32 GB ram. I keep readying conflicting info on the voltage thing. If I'm buying 1.65v 2400 ram, is this a problem for either the mobo or cpu (i.e., versus 1.5v)? I am still looking at the Corsair Veng Pro http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00GM83C86/?tag=pcpapi-20

    If I will end up running these at lower freq/voltage anyway, I might as well buy lower.
    Thanks much!!!
  15. No, 1.5 is the recommendation for sticks at stock 1600 (the MC's native freq), 1.6-1.65 is fine for higher freqs (2133 and up)
  16. Tradesman1 said:
    Yep, the Tridents as mentioned in my earlier post are the best I've found


    Hi.,

    I'm now considering the exact setup that you have: i7 4770k on Maximus VI Hero with 32GB of Trident. May I ask you 2 questions:
    1. Do you have a (big) CPU cooler (e.g., CM Hyper 212 EVO) and if so, is there enough clearance?
    2. Any issues running your 1.65v ram at 2400?

    Thanks much!
  17. Tradesman1 said:
    No, 1.5 is the recommendation for sticks at stock 1600 (the MC's native freq), 1.6-1.65 is fine for higher freqs (2133 and up)


    Thanks, sorry our posts crossed paths.
  18. Hyper 212 will work fine up to a 4.5 OC, (used one while waiting for the GTS V8 to be released (had already pre-puchased it) and it's fine (the fan height is adjustable), and no problems, the bulk of my builds going back to 2011 have been with sticks 2133 and up, most all at 1.6-1.65, my SB 2500K, started with 1866/1.6 and moved to 32GB of Ripjaws X at 2133/9 soon after, my IB 3570K runs 32GB of 2400 Tridents and have 32GB of Tridents in 2666 on the Haswell ;)
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