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Graphics card needs 8+6 pin PCI-E, PSU only has 6 pin

I'm in the middle of buying a new graphics card and I'm wanting to get the MSI GTX 760 TwinFrozr 2GB card from what I've gathered the card requires both a 6 and an 8 pin PCI-E connector and a minimum of 500W. My PSU is a Cooler Master extreme 500W supply but this supply only has one 6 pin PCI-E output and I'm just wondering if there's a way I can run this particular card with this PSU?
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  1. You can buy a power adapter. 8 pin to 2molex connectors.
  2. You can use a 2 x Molex to 8-pin cable if you have purchased one but it's recommended that you don't use it for an extended amount of time as it can sometimes reduce the lifespan of the card.
  3. My philosophy is if your PSU doesn't have the connectors for it, don't use it. Get a new PSU, obviously the one you have isn't designed for quality products.
  4. woltej1 said:
    My philosophy is if your PSU doesn't have the connectors for it, don't use it. Get a new PSU, obviously the one you have isn't designed for quality products.
  5. Best answer
    armedninja said:
    I'm in the middle of buying a new graphics card and I'm wanting to get the MSI GTX 760 TwinFrozr 2GB card from what I've gathered the card requires both a 6 and an 8 pin PCI-E connector and a minimum of 500W. My PSU is a Cooler Master extreme 500W supply but this supply only has one 6 pin PCI-E output and I'm just wondering if there's a way I can run this particular card with this PSU?

    Is it this model? http://www.coolermaster.com/service/support/extreme-power-500w/
    I kinda agree with woltej1; Only having 1 6-pin PCI-E built in is not good; you may or may not want to risk it.

    Note: you have enough power on the +12v rail, but it's cutting it close... in fact, it may be rather risky since the rails are split.
    I estimated about 300VA (25amps on the +12v rail) for a guy with a AMD 8-core system and GTX 760. Your power supply can do 30amps, but it's split into two rails and may or may not distribute properly, especially with the lack of extra PCI-E cable.

    Long story short, you can try it if you want to risk it. I would definitely not want to build a system like that if I had the choice though.
  6. The GTX760 TDP is 170W which works out around 14amps. If it is the PSU above, each 12v rail will only do 16A, which is cutting it close even if you have 1 rail feeding only the 760 and nothing else. 1 rail may just go to the PCIe connector, so potentially by using molexes you are tapping into the other rail, but 2 issues I see with this; you need to be sure which rail feeds which connectors and check that it's safe to join 2 rails together (which is what you'll be doing feeding them into the 760). I doubt it is ok to do this. I would suggest a better PSU with a combined 12v rail to make things easier and safer.

    I did use molexes on a single rail supply to supply an extra PCIe connector, nothing wrong with that, it's the same 12v rail, but split rails are more complicated.
  7. woltej1 said:
    My philosophy is if your PSU doesn't have the connectors for it, don't use it. Get a new PSU, obviously the one you have isn't designed for quality products.


    Whilst in this instance, I agree with this post, I don't agree with the blanket nature of the statement. I have an older OCZ 1000w PSU which has served me well for my outdated 4890, only using 2 of the 4x6 Pin PCIe power connectors, So, new card, new connection, needs 1x6 pin & 1x8 pin. Why, the card uses less power than the 4890! Should I throw away a perfectly good & expensive PSU just because the card manufacturer has decided to change the connector type? Not everyone can afford to upgrade their rig every couple of years.

    My motto, 'Be careful, seek advice, Examine the worst case scenario!"
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