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i7 4770k vs i7 4820k

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January 11, 2014 1:54:59 AM

For my future build, I would be glad to know your opinions : Which one is better - 4770k or 4820k ?- comparing the socket futureproofing (LGA 1150 or LGA 2011) , the price- performance, and power requirements.

More about : 4770k 4820k

a b à CPUs
January 11, 2014 5:38:13 AM

Basically, I'm much more concerned about the socket. My next upgrade would be after 3-4 years. I don't want to waste my money buying a new motherboard. So, which of the following sockets will Intel continue to launch processors?
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a b à CPUs
January 11, 2014 1:30:42 PM

With Intel there is no such thing as future proofing
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January 11, 2014 5:06:46 PM

Bonecrushrr said:
With Intel there is no such thing as future proofing


Honestly, this is bollocks, really. I see people with old Sandy Bridge CPU's still rocking very well.

I think Intel CPUs are VERY future proof. If you buy a higher end Haswell today, you are covered for the next 3-4 years really.

I, myself, got I7-4770 non-K several months ago and really, it covers all my bases just fine. I think it's just better to buy a cheaper I7 now and upgrade it 3-4 years from now, since you will have by then new chipsets, new architectures and new stuff like USB 3.1 and what not and I7-4770K will easily be enough for everything until then anyway, no point overkilling with 4820 and such.

Also, I can assure you that both sockets will be obsolete by then, you will WANT to buy a new motherboard in 3-4 years anyway, just because of USB 3.1 for starters.
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January 11, 2014 5:37:38 PM

Gaidax said:
Bonecrushrr said:
With Intel there is no such thing as future proofing


Honestly, this is bollocks, really. I see people with old Sandy Bridge CPU's still rocking very well.

I think Intel CPUs are VERY future proof. If you buy a higher end Haswell today, you are covered for the next 3-4 years really.

I, myself, got I7-4770 non-K several months ago and really, it covers all my bases just fine. I think it's just better to buy a cheaper I7 now and upgrade it 3-4 years from now, since you will have by then new chipsets, new architectures and new stuff like USB 3.1 and what not and I7-4770K will easily be enough for everything until then anyway, no point overkilling with 4820 and such.

Also, I can assure you that both sockets will be obsolete by then, you will WANT to buy a new motherboard in 3-4 years anyway, just because of USB 3.1 for starters.


That's not what I was referring too if you read the op's post.

"Basically, I'm much more concerned about the socket. My next upgrade would be after 3-4 years. I don't want to waste my money buying a new motherboard. So, which of the following sockets will Intel continue to launch processors?"

Intel changes sockets with nearly every processor generation and he wanted to know which line to buy to have the motherboard futureproof and possible to upgrade just the CPU in 3-4 years. This is why I said NONE as the socket will likely die when the next generation of CPU releases.

@ Gaidax
As for the CPU being future proof, either CPU will be decent for 3 to 4 years barring any huge architecture changes between now and then. I just replaced my I7-920 and it was still going strong however my mobo started to go on the fritz and even today the 920 is with a 3.56 ghz oc was still going strong. I ever did say the CPU would be dead In 3 years just the socket.
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January 11, 2014 5:57:31 PM

AlexSmith96 said:
Basically, I'm much more concerned about the socket. My next upgrade would be after 3-4 years. I don't want to waste my money buying a new motherboard. So, which of the following sockets will Intel continue to launch processors?


LGA 2011 is being replaced with LGA 2011-3 starting this fall. According to this, there won't be forwards or backwards compatibility so Ivy Bridge-E are the last generation of chips you'll be able to use on an LGA 2011 motherboard.

With LGA 1150 your situation is better, but also maybe not good enough to be able to reuse your motherboard in 3-4 years. LGA 1150 is about 1 years old. Intel is releasing a refresh to Haswell (the first LGA 1150 CPU) in a few months, and Broadwell is to follow in early 2015. Broadwell will also use LGA 1150. Broadwell was supposed to be released around the middle of 2014, but got delayed. I don't think Intel has announced it, but this might ultimately cause a delay in the release of Broadwell's successor, Skylake (which will not be LGA 1150), so that Skylake isn't launched only a few months after Broadwell is. Skylake will therefore likely not come out before the end of 2015 at the earliest, and very likely sometime in the first half of 2016. See this article for more info.

So you can see, we are about two years from Skylake and it's LGA 1151 socket, and maybe about a year (or two if you count refreshed chips) from the final launch of new LGA 1150 CPUs. If Intel runs into trouble with developing Skylake and has to push that back, refreshed Broadwell chips may be the best thing on offer. But it would be very unlikely that Intel would launch Skylake in 2017 when they were originally shooting for (and development wise, no bad news yet) for 2015/2016.

Finally, the difference between original Haswell and Broadwell, even refreshed Broadwell chips, are not likely to be huge. Just look at comparisons between Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge. You don't have great options if you were looking to get a feature heavy motherboard now and put in the newest Intel chips in 3-4 years. If your concern is more towards future proofing as opposed to a need now, maybe go with a cheaper CPU/mobo now, wait until Skylake hits, and then go for a strong CPU/mobo combo right at launch to get more life out of those components?
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a b à CPUs
January 11, 2014 8:57:29 PM

Well, basically my point is that either choice is as future proof as you can have it, because honestly, unless we like reverse-engineer technology from aliens or something, I do not expect I7-4770K to become obsolete or heck even weak in the next 3 years. Either of the sockets will go out of commission very soon, though.

I wouldn't even count on Broadwell thing matching current I7 sockets, since it will go along with new chipsets, which probably means that series 8 chipset won't be compatible anyway, new socket or not. Besides, how much better can it be than Haswell, really? 10% at best, maybe?

I still do suggest I7-4770K, just because the LGA2011 option probably means that you will want to keep that CPU/Motherboard for at least 4 years, which, in my opinion is not that good due to new standards creeping in soon. You could easily piggy bank the difference and reuse it after 3 years for Skylake or whatever pops up at that time, although I believe that Haswell to Skylake still won't be enough difference for upgrade, unless Skylake ends up being something out of this world, which I doubt it will be.
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January 11, 2014 9:03:19 PM

I would just like to +1 everything that Gaidax has already said, he knows what he is talking about.
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January 11, 2014 10:03:29 PM

THANK YOU VERY MUCH GUYS for all your answers. I would specially thank Gaidax for his views. Gaidax you really deserve the 'CPU MAster' badge. I'd give a definite go for the 4770k. Hats off to LGA 1150.
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