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First time building a PC! Need help.

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January 12, 2014 2:34:04 AM

Hello tomshardware, this is my first post in the forum as well as my first time building a pc. I went and looked at sites and reviews for parts and this is what I came up with: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2zshj

I am still confused with how much PSU wattage to get since pcpartpicker says I need about 467W while other PS Calculators would say I need about 650W. Also, are ROG boards good? If I could get another mobo with almost the same features but with a lower price I would be happy to buy that one instead.

I will be using this for maxing out games on a single 1920x1080p monitor with a bit of CAD so would the gpu be overkill? I hope to use this setup without another upgrade for the next 3-4 years. Thanks in advance. :D 

(This is on a 2000$ budget not including monitor, keyboard, mouse and OS)

More about : time building

January 12, 2014 2:49:46 AM

Why don't you up your optical drive for blu ray?
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a b ) Power supply
a c 87 U Graphics card
a b V Motherboard
January 12, 2014 3:02:39 AM

PS calculators lie through their teeth. A 550w unit will be more than enough.

I have an ROG board, because they're bloody incredible when it comes to their small form factor builds because of how tightly packed they are... they aren't really worth it for ATX boards.

Lemme just tell you this: You're TRYING to waste money here. Like, seriously. A $2000 budget is too much for what you're doing, and there are a lot of other issues. Lemme go down the list to try to help you save money and not have hideous buyer's remorse.

1) Don't buy an i7. If when you say you're doing a bit of CAD, you mean you're doing renders for work and school, and thus need them to complete in as little time as possible because your time equals money, go for it, but if you're just playing around with it, it's a hideous waste of money. The only difference between an i7 and an i5 is that the i7 has a tiny bit more L3 cashe, which doesn't matter for gaming, and hyperthreading. There are a lot of people on these forums, especially new posters begging for "best answers," who don't understand how hyperthreading works. Hyperthreading only applies to double-precision workloads - i.e. calculations that have to be accurate to some hundredth decimal place. Games should not be doing hardly ANY of these calculations; those that are are not well optimized. That means that for gaming, an i7 is $100 more for perhaps a 3% improvement in all of 5 whole games... and no, that's not going to change in the future.

2) Don't get a closed loop cooler. There are WAAAYYY too many issues. They're noisy, they aren't any better than big air coolers, they have more moving parts and so are more likely to fail, and when they do fail, they're going to do so catastrophically. A water cooler failure means liquid all over your expensive computer, and then your CPU frying itself because it has nothing to remove the heat. A heatsink failure means your fan dies, maybe a part breaks off and scratches your paint, but you've still got this huge metal heatsink allowing the CPU time to downclock safely. Since you really aren't going to be doing any fancy overclocking, I'm guessing, you should go with something like a Hyper 212 EVO. It's only $30, and will easily get your chip to about 4.2-4.4 GHz.

3) Don't buy a $200 motherboard. After about $150, motherboards' value drops off incredibly rapidly. I would suggest something like the AsRock z87 Extreme 4. I know some people don't like the brand because they make budget boards, but what they don't realize is that AsRock began as a subsidiary of Asus. They were tasked with making a better budget motherboard, and did so well that they split into their own brand.

4) You're wasting a lot of money there. For $70, you can get 8GB of ram, which is enough to simultaneously run battlefield 3, photoshop, AND 30 tabs in chrome. There's no reason to go with 16 unless you KNOW that you're going to be using it all when rendering... and if you don't know, get 8, and then you can throw another two sticks in later to upgrade to 16.

5) That's really close to a good pick on the SSD, but there's no reason to get the pro when there is no noticeable difference between it and the EVO for $40 less.

6) Getting a WD Black is up to you - I tend to pick the Blues, as they're cheaper, slightly faster, and I'm not worried about the 5-year warranty. The warranty doesn't cover data recovery, so you should be backing up regularly anyways.

7) Good god that's overkill on your video card, dude. A 770 for two HUNDRED less dollars is going to pretty much max out everything at 1080p. You're also way way way better off getting a cheaper card now and upgrading later - you could either get a second 770, possibly used, and put them in SLI, or just sell this one and get a new card in 2-3 years when you're noticing that your performance in games is dropping to an unacceptable level. That way, at the end of 3-4 years, instead of having a 4-year old card that's starting to REALLY show its age, you either have two medium-power cards, or a newer and still higher-end card. If you're doubtful of this, go look at NCIX's youtube video on why there's no such thing as future proofing - he goes into this theory in much more detail.

8) Decent pick on the case, but you could go with a micro atx motherboard and case if you wanted to. Are the fans below it for the case or for your cooler? Because you should know that they won't fit on the cooler. They are really good fans, though.

9) Beautiful pick on the power supply - that's pretty much my go-to when I don't want the Seasonic x-650. (which isn't in PCpartpicker, but is pretty much the best power supply every made, period.)

10) As for the optical drive, you can install windows from a USB stick - consider if you really have anything that you use on a CD anymore. I scrapped optical drives in my computers long ago, and if I need something on a CD, just had an old portable CD reader that works for the rare occasions I need it to.

Your build as it's standing right now is $1880 - that goes up to well over $2000 when you consider that PCpartpicker doesn't include shipping and so you don't want to buy from more than two or maybe three places.

If you make the changes I recommend to you, you end up with something like this build, which is significantly cheaper - after the same shipping and whatnot, this rig (which will give you the exact same visible performance) is going to be at least $800 less.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($33.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($99.92 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($329.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: SeaSonic G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($85.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $1147.83
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-12 06:01 EST-0500)
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a b ) Power supply
a c 87 U Graphics card
a b V Motherboard
January 12, 2014 3:05:15 AM

unplanned bacon said:
Why don't you up your optical drive for blu ray?


...that's a horrible idea.

First, blu ray drives are expensive. Second, you have to then PAY to use the software that can read through the DRM on the blu ray drives. Third, this software, even though you have to pay to use it, is almost universally buggy and has compatibility issues. Fourth, there are dozens of ways to get HD content on a computer; blu rays are okay for getting it on a TV, but youtube offers streaming 1080p now for goodness' sake. Fifth, most people can completely do without even a CD reader now - why spend money on something like a blu ray player that you're probably never going to use?

Sorry for the rant, but blu ray players are kinda one of my pet peeves. :p 
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January 12, 2014 3:36:05 AM

DarkSable said:
unplanned bacon said:
Why don't you up your optical drive for blu ray?


...that's a horrible idea.

First, blu ray drives are expensive. Second, you have to then PAY to use the software that can read through the DRM on the blu ray drives. Third, this software, even though you have to pay to use it, is almost universally buggy and has compatibility issues. Fourth, there are dozens of ways to get HD content on a computer; blu rays are okay for getting it on a TV, but youtube offers streaming 1080p now for goodness' sake. Fifth, most people can completely do without even a CD reader now - why spend money on something like a blu ray player that you're probably never going to use?

Sorry for the rant, but blu ray players are kinda one of my pet peeves. :p 


I prefer optical media over download (except in a couple of cases, so I will do both for films, but for gaming I prefer optical media) and have already made the switch to Blu Ray for my films, so at least from my standpoint it makes sense. I personally wouldn't build a computer without an optical drive at this time, and would think twice about getting one without one. But then again, I've never built before

What is this Blu Ray DRM you speak of? Would it affect my build?
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a b ) Power supply
a b U Graphics card
a b V Motherboard
January 12, 2014 4:36:47 AM

Quote:
1) Don't buy an i7. If when you say you're doing a bit of CAD, you mean you're doing renders for work and school, and thus need them to complete in as little time as possible because your time equals money, go for it, but if you're just playing around with it, it's a hideous waste of money. The only difference between an i7 and an i5 is that the i7 has a tiny bit more L3 cashe, which doesn't matter for gaming, and hyperthreading. There are a lot of people on these forums, especially new posters begging for "best answers," who don't understand how hyperthreading works. Hyperthreading only applies to double-precision workloads - i.e. calculations that have to be accurate to some hundredth decimal place. Games should not be doing hardly ANY of these calculations; those that are are not well optimized. That means that for gaming, an i7 is $100 more for perhaps a 3% improvement in all of 5 whole games... and no, that's not going to change in the future.

How you can be so sure about this? Still HT CPU is jnown to 20-30% faster in some aplications. No it is not cheap.
But it can still good buy. Now there is bit OC issue in this matter too. Just wonderin why i7 OC better than i5?
And i5 can be poos buy too. Why do you want to buy OC able cpu that is not any faster than non OC same price cpu?
Intel Xeon is here same price as 4670k and you need to OC i5 over 5.5 to make it faster than Xeon. Still i5 do have iGPU and xeon do not have. So why why do yu want to pay something what gives you nothing benefit like iGPU?

Quote:
2) Don't get a closed loop cooler. There are WAAAYYY too many issues. They're noisy, they aren't any better than big air coolers, they have more moving parts and so are more likely to fail, and when they do fail, they're going to do so catastrophically. A water cooler failure means liquid all over your expensive computer, and then your CPU frying itself because it has nothing to remove the heat. A heatsink failure means your fan dies, maybe a part breaks off and scratches your paint, but you've still got this huge metal heatsink allowing the CPU time to downclock safely. Since you really aren't going to be doing any fancy overclocking, I'm guessing, you should go with something like a Hyper 212 EVO. It's only $30, and will easily get your chip to about 4.2-4.4 GHz.

CM 212 EVO is not a good buy. It is louder than Thermalright macho and macho gives more OC so put in 15$ more and you get real quality cpu cooler.

Quote:
3) Don't buy a $200 motherboard. After about $150, motherboards' value drops off incredibly rapidly. I would suggest something like the AsRock z87 Extreme 4. I know some people don't like the brand because they make budget boards, but what they don't realize is that AsRock began as a subsidiary of Asus. They were tasked with making a better budget motherboard, and did so well that they split into their own brand.

What is better? Now I have seen AsRock mobo and it was so good wekded that it did have back 5mm thick welding waste. If this is what you call good quality then just buy AsRock. All we know that AsRock was under asus before. But this do not mean it is good now do it? Best OC able Z-87 mobo under 150$ price is gigabyte X-D3H.

Quote:
5) That's really close to a good pick on the SSD, but there's no reason to get the pro when there is no noticeable difference between it and the EVO for $40 less.

128GB is too small SSD abyway. Id look for 256GB and Id not buy TLC chip. There is cheap good MLC chip like sandisk ultra plus. Samsung evo is really slow on write speeds 120GB is really slow. 250GB is bit better But PRO is much better.

Quote:
9) Beautiful pick on the power supply - that's pretty much my go-to when I don't want the Seasonic x-650. (which isn't in PCpartpicker, but is pretty much the best power supply every made, period.)

No it is not. Not even close. http://www.behardware.com/articles/862-3/components-ret...
Best reliabity is made by super flower and rosewill.
This is best. http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Rosewill-CAPSTON...

So my build looks like this. And i like bigger psu's so Id buy this one.
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/rosewill-power-supply-ligh...
Then you are not wasting money for a small psu and you can SLI video cards if you need :) 
Id also look 4GB video card.
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/zotac-video-card-zt7030410...

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Thermalright Macho-120 73.6 CFM CPU Cooler ($45.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z87X-D3H ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($143.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($84.98 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Sandisk Ultra Plus 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($164.62 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($106.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($329.99 @ Newegg)
Case: BitFenix Ghost (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Rosewill Capstone 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($84.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($16.98 @ OutletPC)
Total: $1272.51
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-12 07:32 EST-0500)
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January 15, 2014 6:07:55 AM

Thanks for the answers guys, you saved me hundreds of dollars and the processor and gpu decision is pretty clear now although I'm still pretty confused with the motherboard.
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January 15, 2014 6:09:42 AM

DarkSable said:
PS calculators lie through their teeth. A 550w unit will be more than enough.

I have an ROG board, because they're bloody incredible when it comes to their small form factor builds because of how tightly packed they are... they aren't really worth it for ATX boards.

Lemme just tell you this: You're TRYING to waste money here. Like, seriously. A $2000 budget is too much for what you're doing, and there are a lot of other issues. Lemme go down the list to try to help you save money and not have hideous buyer's remorse.

1) Don't buy an i7. If when you say you're doing a bit of CAD, you mean you're doing renders for work and school, and thus need them to complete in as little time as possible because your time equals money, go for it, but if you're just playing around with it, it's a hideous waste of money. The only difference between an i7 and an i5 is that the i7 has a tiny bit more L3 cashe, which doesn't matter for gaming, and hyperthreading. There are a lot of people on these forums, especially new posters begging for "best answers," who don't understand how hyperthreading works. Hyperthreading only applies to double-precision workloads - i.e. calculations that have to be accurate to some hundredth decimal place. Games should not be doing hardly ANY of these calculations; those that are are not well optimized. That means that for gaming, an i7 is $100 more for perhaps a 3% improvement in all of 5 whole games... and no, that's not going to change in the future.

2) Don't get a closed loop cooler. There are WAAAYYY too many issues. They're noisy, they aren't any better than big air coolers, they have more moving parts and so are more likely to fail, and when they do fail, they're going to do so catastrophically. A water cooler failure means liquid all over your expensive computer, and then your CPU frying itself because it has nothing to remove the heat. A heatsink failure means your fan dies, maybe a part breaks off and scratches your paint, but you've still got this huge metal heatsink allowing the CPU time to downclock safely. Since you really aren't going to be doing any fancy overclocking, I'm guessing, you should go with something like a Hyper 212 EVO. It's only $30, and will easily get your chip to about 4.2-4.4 GHz.

3) Don't buy a $200 motherboard. After about $150, motherboards' value drops off incredibly rapidly. I would suggest something like the AsRock z87 Extreme 4. I know some people don't like the brand because they make budget boards, but what they don't realize is that AsRock began as a subsidiary of Asus. They were tasked with making a better budget motherboard, and did so well that they split into their own brand.

4) You're wasting a lot of money there. For $70, you can get 8GB of ram, which is enough to simultaneously run battlefield 3, photoshop, AND 30 tabs in chrome. There's no reason to go with 16 unless you KNOW that you're going to be using it all when rendering... and if you don't know, get 8, and then you can throw another two sticks in later to upgrade to 16.

5) That's really close to a good pick on the SSD, but there's no reason to get the pro when there is no noticeable difference between it and the EVO for $40 less.

6) Getting a WD Black is up to you - I tend to pick the Blues, as they're cheaper, slightly faster, and I'm not worried about the 5-year warranty. The warranty doesn't cover data recovery, so you should be backing up regularly anyways.

7) Good god that's overkill on your video card, dude. A 770 for two HUNDRED less dollars is going to pretty much max out everything at 1080p. You're also way way way better off getting a cheaper card now and upgrading later - you could either get a second 770, possibly used, and put them in SLI, or just sell this one and get a new card in 2-3 years when you're noticing that your performance in games is dropping to an unacceptable level. That way, at the end of 3-4 years, instead of having a 4-year old card that's starting to REALLY show its age, you either have two medium-power cards, or a newer and still higher-end card. If you're doubtful of this, go look at NCIX's youtube video on why there's no such thing as future proofing - he goes into this theory in much more detail.

8) Decent pick on the case, but you could go with a micro atx motherboard and case if you wanted to. Are the fans below it for the case or for your cooler? Because you should know that they won't fit on the cooler. They are really good fans, though.

9) Beautiful pick on the power supply - that's pretty much my go-to when I don't want the Seasonic x-650. (which isn't in PCpartpicker, but is pretty much the best power supply every made, period.)

10) As for the optical drive, you can install windows from a USB stick - consider if you really have anything that you use on a CD anymore. I scrapped optical drives in my computers long ago, and if I need something on a CD, just had an old portable CD reader that works for the rare occasions I need it to.

Your build as it's standing right now is $1880 - that goes up to well over $2000 when you consider that PCpartpicker doesn't include shipping and so you don't want to buy from more than two or maybe three places.

If you make the changes I recommend to you, you end up with something like this build, which is significantly cheaper - after the same shipping and whatnot, this rig (which will give you the exact same visible performance) is going to be at least $800 less.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($33.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($99.92 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($329.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: SeaSonic G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($85.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $1147.83
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-12 06:01 EST-0500)


Thanks! :D  Are closed loop coolers really that bad? If that's the case, would a NH-D14 be too heavy or would it even fit in a BitFenix Ronin Case?
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a b ) Power supply
a b U Graphics card
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January 15, 2014 7:57:54 AM

I have the NH D14 and it is not too heavy.

Will also fit in the case. According to THIS REVIEW the case has clearance for a 170 mm tall HSF. The NH D14 is only 160mm tall.

IMHO, the best air cooler that money can buy!

Yogi
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a b ) Power supply
a c 87 U Graphics card
a b V Motherboard
January 15, 2014 11:13:02 AM

Sorry OP, I know the thread has been answered... I'm just going to give this guy some responses.


AxlFone said:
How you can be so sure about this? Still HT CPU is jnown to 20-30% faster in some aplications. No it is not cheap. But it can still good buy. Now there is bit OC issue in this matter too. Just wonderin why i7 OC better than i5? And i5 can be poos buy too. Why do you want to buy OC able cpu that is not any faster than non OC same price cpu? Intel Xeon is here same price as 4670k and you need to OC i5 over 5.5 to make it faster than Xeon. Still i5 do have iGPU and xeon do not have. So why why do yu want to pay something what gives you nothing benefit like iGPU?

...Aside from your brash, poorly written attack, you're absolutely incorrect - give me a break. 1) Yes, hyperthreading is known to give roughly 30% better performance in applications such as number crunching, which rely heavily on double-precision calculations that have to be accurate out to some hundredth decimal place. Games shouldn't be making enough of these calculations to get 3% better performance.

i7s don't overclock better than i5s - that's only true if you're a very early adopter and buy your chip within the first couple months when they bin the i7s heavily to get a higher return rate. What exactly does "And i5 can be poos buy too." mean? I can't tell if you're angry, drunk, don't have any idea what you're talking about, or all three.

What in the world are you talking about with your Xeon bs? Xeons aren't made for anywhere close to the sort of tasks that a gaming computer is put through, and no, you don't have to overclock an i5 to anywhere near 5.5GHz to get it to rival a xeon - they're slow and produce a lot of heat... The Xeons and Extreme chips that actually do have benefits are $600+


AxlFone said:
CM 212 EVO is not a good buy. It is louder than Thermalright macho and macho gives more OC so put in 15$ more and you get real quality cpu cooler.

...well, yeah. If you spend 50% more, you are going to get something a bit better. But saying the EVO is not a good buy just because there's something better is like saying that a GTX is not a good buy because a Ford GT is faster. The EVO is relatively quiet, and still gives more than enough cooling performance for any first time or moderate overclocker - anybody interested in more will know that, and will buy a cooling setup to match.

AxlFone said:
What is better? Now I have seen AsRock mobo and it was so good wekded that it did have back 5mm thick welding waste. If this is what you call good quality then just buy AsRock. All we know that AsRock was under asus before. But this do not mean it is good now do it? Best OC able Z-87 mobo under 150$ price is gigabyte X-D3H.

Oh dear. Okay, now I know that you're drunk. Yes, AsRock motherboards are slightly thinner... that's because more design has been put into them in order to make them thinner, meaning they don't have to print as many layers of PCB, cutting down cost. A lot of people don't know they were under Asus, and presume that they're another off-name brand.

As for buying a Gigabyte motherboard, that's something that I will never do again and never let someone else do again if I can avoid it. Their "customer service" is the worst that I have ever seen - if you get a bad part, you can give up all hope of getting it fixed or replaced with a working one. Gigabyte is like throwing money down the drain, to me.

AxlFone said:
128GB is too small SSD abyway. Id look for 256GB and Id not buy TLC chip. There is cheap good MLC chip like sandisk ultra plus. Samsung evo is really slow on write speeds 120GB is really slow. 250GB is bit better But PRO is much better.

...Again, what the hell are you talking about? 128GB is way more than enough room for Windows, any programs that you want, and the very few games that actually get a benefit from being on an SSD. Unless you're dual-booting operating systems or have a specialized use, there's no reason to spend way more money to get a 256GB drive. As for TLC, yes it's slightly lower quality, but it's significantly cheaper. The EVO really isn't that slow on write speeds - you would notice it coming from a PRO, probably, but coming from a mechanical hard drive, it's going to feel like lightning. (Write speeds really shouldn't be very important for an SSD anyways - if you're writing stuff to it all the time, you're doing it wrong.)


AxlFone said:
No it is not. Not even close. http://www.behardware.com/articles/862-3/components-ret...
Best reliabity is made by super flower and rosewill.
This is best. http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Rosewill-CAPSTON...


You just have no comprehension of the world, do you... That data is all within the margin of error, but if you really want to believe in it, you do realize that under the 500-550w models, the Seasonic beat out everything else? That's also absolutely INANE data to use, because all that's talking about is the rate of the part showing up dead on arrival. That has nothing to do with reliability OR quality.

As for yourself, did you even READ that review you just linked me? On page three, it lists what parts should be in a high end power supply, and states that low end power supplies use fewer components. Then it goes on to say that this power supply is missing an MOV, which what regulates spikes coming from the power grid... which is one of the most important things the PSU does to keep your components lasting longer.

Compare that to the Seasonic X-650, which pretty much made johnny guru fall out of his chair. It's nearly completely silent, it has incredibly good efficiency (as in, numbers that are basically impossible...), and when the thing gets put into a hotbox at almost 50c... the power supply still maintained 80+ GOLD standard (which is tested 30c below that) with ripple and noise that you couldn't even barely see as being there.


AxlFone said:
So my build looks like this. And i like bigger psu's so Id buy this one.
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/rosewill-power-supply-ligh...
Then you are not wasting money for a small psu and you can SLI video cards if you need :) 
Id also look 4GB video card.
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/zotac-video-card-zt7030410...

Well, you can buy a bigger PSU if you like, but all that does is make it run less efficiently. You're spending MORE money for something you don't need.... which means you're the one wasting money, bubba, not me. The point about SLI is true, and I mentioned that you want a 750w unit if you plan to go with SLI.

As for a 4GB card, you really like to waste money, don't you. First of all, Zotac is only a mediocre brand at best, and second, the only thing that the VRAM does is hold the images before they're sent to the screen. The only reason you could possibly need 4GB is if you're running at a very high resolution (i.e. 1600p or triple monitor gaming) or if you're playing a somewhat badly ported game like skyrim with dozens upon dozens of mods.
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January 15, 2014 12:30:24 PM

Quote:
Well, you can buy a bigger PSU if you like, but all that does is make it run less efficiently. You're spending MORE money for something you don't need.... which means you're the one wasting money, bubba, not me. The point about SLI is true, and I mentioned that you want a 750w unit if you plan to go with SLI.


I do need more power. More video cards do need more power. And I OC. Now I do have two 780's but next I buy one card more. No 3 way SLI but need one video card more for more screens. Amd my experince bigger psu's are more reliable than smaller ones.

Quote:
As for a 4GB card, you really like to waste money, don't you. First of all, Zotac is only a mediocre brand at best, and second, the only thing that the VRAM does is hold the images before they're sent to the screen. The only reason you could possibly need 4GB is if you're running at a very high resolution (i.e. 1600p or triple monitor gaming) or if you're playing a somewhat badly ported game like skyrim with dozens upon dozens of mods.

Not really. If 4GB card is same price then it is better than 2GB card.
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/gigabyte-video-card-gvn760...
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/zotac-video-card-zt7040610...
Zotac do have better warranty 2+3 years if yo u register card. + It do not lose warranty if you do water cool build like other cards. One yhing is that bigger resolution needs more memory. New games need too more memory.
Seems like you do not know much of new builds? :D  If you suggest small psu then it can came too small. PSU loses power after couple years. So in lond term bigger is better. Max efficiency is in 40-60%?
60-80 is good load for psu. And now I mean good gold label or better psu. But can 750w psu do SLI with two 780's? No. Not with all cards. If you OC video cards It is easy to make take over 330w / card. Now then if you OC cpu + memory there is not enough power to do that. My Rosewill tachyon just is not enough with two 780's + OC cpu + video cards. So I buy 1000w or 1300w to make it work as I want.


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a b ) Power supply
a c 87 U Graphics card
a b V Motherboard
January 15, 2014 3:10:21 PM

That's fine, dude, YOU need more power, but that doesn't mean other people who aren't using three cards are. And no, larger wattage PSUs are in no way more reliable than smaller ones unless you're trying to use the smaller ones beyond what they're rated for... or you stick with a bad brand and the smaller PSUs are made by a cheap OEM but the larger ones are made by someone more reliable.

In the case of the two cards you have there, the Gigabyte is a much better option, because it has a far better cooler and better clocks. Zotac has a bad cooler, and they aren't an amazing brand. Also, EVGA has a better warranty plus the same deal where you can water cool without breaking your warranty... and I've never heard of Zotac doing that before. Bigger resolution does need more VRAM... I already said that. I also suggested that there are a few games that, when you mod them, benefit from having a larger VRAM cashe.

As for power supplies, are you kidding me? Yes, if you take two of the most high end graphics cards and then overclock them and throw them in a system, you need a larger PSU. As for degredation, it's only about 20% after four years. If you want to buy a 1300w power supply, that's fine, but don't tell other people that they need to because you should in a very specific situation.
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