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Help Building First DIY Gaming PC vs prebuilt iBuyPower

Tags:
  • Gaming
  • Do It Yourself
  • Video Editing
  • Systems
  • Prebuilt Systems
Last response: in Systems
January 12, 2014 2:47:41 AM

Approximate Purchase Date: within 1-2 months

Budget Range: Preferably somewhere between $500-$700


System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming, music production/recording, audio engineering, video editing, school, casual browsing.


Parts Not Required: Don't really know where to start. Need help laying down a foundation.


Preferred Website for Parts: Newegg.com seems to be the top choice


Country: U.S.


Parts Preferences: Enough for optimal gaming. Mostly plan on playing less demanding games on Steam. (DayZ, Rust, Wasteland 2, maybe some Fallout, Civilization V, etc.)


Overclocking: Only slightly familiar with this concept.


Monitor Resolution: 1080p (although not as important as the tower build itself)


Additional Comments: Basically I'm at a standstill after 2 days worth of extensive research and web-surfing for an affordable/reliable gaming pc. I began simply looking for an upgrade to my far outdated Toshiba laptop for something that can handle modern games without any problems. However, after delving deeper into the world of GPUs and CPUs I came to the realization that an upgrade-able/traditional desktop would be the wisest choice in the long run. So my hunt began, and I started comparing countless different computers from various different websites. Through Newegg, I finally stumbled upon iBuyPower.com. There options seem so promising at such an affordable price. As a result, here's what I managed to come up with:

AMD FX 4-Core Configurator
Case: 1 x ARC 647 Gaming Case - Black
Processor: 1 x AMD FX-8320 CPU (8x 3.50GHz/8MB L3 Cache)
Processor Cooling: 1 x Liquid CPU Cooling System [AMD] - Standard 120mm Fan
Memory: 1 x 8 GB [4 GB X2] DDR3-1600 Memory Module - FREE Upgrade to DDR3-1866 ADATA XPG V2
Video Card: 1 x AMD Radeon R7 250 2GB
Free Stuff 1 x [FREE] - GG Cruiser PC200-I Headset /W 4-Pole and 57mm speaker within. - FREE with any System ($29 Value)
Free Stuff 1 x [FREE] - McAfee Antivirus PLUS 2014 - FREE with any System ($49 Value)
Free Stuff 1 x [FREE Game Download] - AMD Bronze Reward - Select 1 Free Game - Free with purchase of AMD Radeon R7 240 and R7 250 Graphics Cards
Motherboard: 1 x ASUS M5A97 R2.0 -- AMD 970
Power Supply: 1 x 500 Watt - Standard
Primary Hard Drive: 1 x 1 TB HARD DRIVE -- 32M Cache, 7200 RPM, 6.0Gb/s - Single Drive
Optical Drive: 1 x 24x Dual Format/Double Layer DVD±R/±RW + CD-R/RW Drive
Sound Card 1 x 3D Premium Surround Sound Onboard
Network Card 1 x Onboard LAN Network (Gb or 10/100)
Operating System 1 x None- Pre-formatted Hard Drive Only
Keyboard 1 x iBUYPOWER Standard Gaming Keyboard
Mouse 1 x iBUYPOWER Standard Gaming Mouse
Monitor X
2nd Monitor X
Speaker System X
Video Camera X
Case Engraving Service X
Warranty 1 x 3 Year Standard Warranty Service
Rush Service 1 x No Rush Service (Ships in 10-15 Business Days)

After looking up the ratings and capabilites of both the CPU and GPU I was pretty satisfied. However, when I decided to look into iBuyPower's reputation among customers, I found that they are often not very reliable (or so it seems). This was a bummer because I thought I had finally found the perfect PC to work for me. And so now I'm here asking two questions. Is iBuyPower in fact reliable? Or should I just go the DIY route like many of the vets here suggest? If the latter, is it possible to find a similar quality build for around the same price?

Ok that was actually three questions. Anyways, my apologies for the LONG response. I just wanna get my situation out in explicit detail so there's no confusion in what I'm hoping to achieve here.

P.S. The subtotal of the prebuilt rig is $604


More about : building diy gaming prebuilt ibuypower

January 17, 2014 3:39:28 PM

You could definitely find a similar or better build quality for about the same price. A good website to assist you in building a PC is www.pcpartpicker.com. You can look at components and it helps identify the best prices available for things. For example, here is something I threw together that is actually better than what you have listed. Granted, it's $150 more than your price but I noticed that the ibuyPower machine you have listed here doesn't even include an operating system. I included Windows 7 as well as a better graphics card, a better PSU, and otherwise similar components. The only thing the computer you listed has that the build I created doesn't is a liquid cooling system, but that's not something you'd need right now and even then, should you start overclocking you can easily get away with a $25 CoolerMaster 212.

Advantages to building it yourself will be better components, you know it's a more solid build since you did it yourself, the pride of it being "yours" and better familiarity with the internal workings of the machine. Plus, if you have to, start out small now and then upgrade at a later time.

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2CXMs
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Best solution

a c 418 4 Gaming
January 17, 2014 4:00:51 PM

No2rdame said:
You could definitely find a similar or better build quality for about the same price. A good website to assist you in building a PC is www.pcpartpicker.com. You can look at components and it helps identify the best prices available for things. For example, here is something I threw together that is actually better than what you have listed. Granted, it's $150 more than your price but I noticed that the ibuyPower machine you have listed here doesn't even include an operating system. I included Windows 7 as well as a better graphics card, a better PSU, and otherwise similar components. The only thing the computer you listed has that the build I created doesn't is a liquid cooling system, but that's not something you'd need right now and even then, should you start overclocking you can easily get away with a $25 CoolerMaster 212.

Advantages to building it yourself will be better components, you know it's a more solid build since you did it yourself, the pride of it being "yours" and better familiarity with the internal workings of the machine. Plus, if you have to, start out small now and then upgrade at a later time.

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2CXMs


The GTX 660 is quite a bit old by now, you want at least a GTX 760 and maybe an Intel i5-4430:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4430 3.0GHz Quad-Core Processor ($184.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: ASRock H87 Pro4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($92.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($84.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($51.98 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($249.98 @ Amazon)
Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($71.30 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $816.19
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-17 19:00 EST-0500)

I went somewhat over budget but that will be a way better rig than anything you can get from Cyberpower.
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January 17, 2014 11:53:00 PM

True, the 660 is a bit older but with the budget I wanted to go with something that may not be top of the line but still pretty solid. I have nothing against Intel chips but I think for a budget the AMD will offer more bang for the buck. Either build is good, but I would definitely go with the 1 TB HD as opposed to the 500GB . It's under $10 more with double the space, which can get eaten up quickly with music, videos, etc.
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