Gigabyte GTX 770 rather high temperatures

My Gigabyte GTX 770 has pretty high temperatures compared to what they write on tests.

I have uninstalled all overclocking/managing software for GPU's, because they caused issues when playing games.

On idle the temperature jumps between 48 - 49*C and under load it's usually jumping around 80*C, and highest was 82*C, I think.

The load temperature is fine, but why is idle so high? Is there something wrong with my GPU, perhaps?

Room temperature - 20-22*C
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  1. Actually your load temperatures aren't fine since the 770 throttles after reaching 80°. Check your minimum clocks with GPU-Z when running demanding applications.

    I suspect that the application of thermal paste could be incorrect or the mounting of the cooler could be bad. I had several Zotac cards at work (older ones, though) where replacing the old thermal paste and ensuring that the cooler was mounted correctly fixed temperature issues. This voids your warranty, though.

    Before you do that you should check if it changes when you leave your side panels open. If it does then you have a ventilation issue. If it persists I would check the core voltages and clocks with GPU-Z and see if anything is higher than it should be according to the specifications from Nvidia, which you can find on their website.
  2. that is a little high, my room is between 25-35 degrees, it gets really hot in here some afternoons, i have a 780ti and it idles usually around 35-40 and when its really hot in here it gets up to the mid 40's. and under full load it hits about 80 on a hot day after a good session of gaming.

    but even saying that, those temperatures are not dangerous to your gpu, they are well within the max threshold.

    is your card overclocked?

    how is the airflow in your case? - maybe try running it with the side panel off for a while

    have you got afterburner or other 3rd party software adjusting your fan settings? these are all things that may be contributing to the elevated idle temps..

    It may be your card too, maybe they didnt put enough thermal paste on it in the factory, or maybe they put too much, its difficult to say...
  3. Beat me to it Wargarbl! but sound advice none the less!
  4. Warrgarbl said:
    Actually your load temperatures aren't fine since the 770 throttles after reaching 80°. Check your minimum clocks with GPU-Z when running demanding applications.

    I suspect that the application of thermal paste could be incorrect or the mounting of the cooler could be bad. I had several Zotac cards at work (older ones, though) where replacing the old thermal paste and ensuring that the cooler was mounted correctly fixed temperature issues. This voids your warranty, though.

    Before you do that you should check if it changes when you leave your side panels open. If it does then you have a ventilation issue. If it persists I would check the core voltages and clocks with GPU-Z and see if anything is higher than it should be according to the specifications from Nvidia, which you can find on their website.

    Anonymous said:
    that is a little high, my room is between 25-35 degrees, it gets really hot in here some afternoons, i have a 780ti and it idles usually around 35-40 and when its really hot in here it gets up to the mid 40's. and under full load it hits about 80 on a hot day after a good session of gaming.

    but even saying that, those temperatures are not dangerous to your gpu, they are well within the max threshold.

    is your card overclocked?

    how is the airflow in your case? - maybe try running it with the side panel off for a while

    have you got afterburner or other 3rd party software adjusting your fan settings? these are all things that may be contributing to the elevated idle temps..

    It may be your card too, maybe they didnt put enough thermal paste on it in the factory, or maybe they put too much, its difficult to say...


    Okay, I tried the CPU-Z with Battlefield 3, after launching the game actually system applies higher clock speed (So called Boost Clock) from 1136.6 to 1254.2 MHz. Never fell below the 1136MHz clock. The temperature got up to 81*C.

    After removing the side panel idle temps are 1 degree lower.

    I should mention that the GPU is upside down, the fans are at the bottom, that's the form factor of the case/mb, and when I had ATi 7950 and it had big overheating problems after a few months of use, I RMA'd it and they said that it has been opened, that the fan or heatsink has been removed, can't remember precisely though, but it hadn't opened it.

    It wouldn't be possible that the heatsink somehow is separating from the GPU because the card is upside down, would it?


    Maybe there is some kind of software controlling this somehow, because I haven't reinstalled the computer since the ATi card, I cleaned up all the ATi drivers though, registry too.
  5. Without having a look at the precise specifications the clocks seem fine. How high is the core voltage? How much Amps does the GPU draw in idle / load? More data please.

    No, it is normal for VGAs to be mounted upside down and this shouldn't be an issue anyway because the actual contact surface of the heatsink is screwed down tight with 4 spacer screws. It might be very possible though that something got bent during manufacturing or the heatsink being faulty which would mean only partial contact with the GPU heatspreader. This could cause such temperatures, and aside from the core voltage being too high would be my bet due to the high idle temperatures, which seem to indicate to me that the cooling isn't applied properly.

    Keep in mind though that other hardware - such as a hot running overclocked CPU - will heat up the ambient temperature of your case substantially which is, in turn, aggravated by third party coolers blowing their hot hair into the case as opposed to out the back as reference designs do.

    Please provide more data. If this proves to be inconclusive I'd rather RMA the card if I were you than void my warranty by removing the heatsink.

    A picture of the insides of your case would be great, too. Maybe the fan sits too close to the PSU?
  6. Warrgarbl said:
    Without having a look at the precise specifications the clocks seem fine. How high is the core voltage? How much Amps does the GPU draw in idle / load? More data please.

    No, it is normal for VGAs to be mounted upside down and this shouldn't be an issue anyway because the actual contact surface of the heatsink is screwed down tight with 4 spacer screws. It might be very possible though that something got bent during manufacturing or the heatsink being faulty which would mean only partial contact with the GPU heatspreader. This could cause such temperatures, and aside from the core voltage being too high would be my bet due to the high idle temperatures, which seem to indicate to me that the cooling isn't applied properly.

    Keep in mind though that other hardware - such as a hot running overclocked CPU - will heat up the ambient temperature of your case substantially which is, in turn, aggravated by third party coolers blowing their hot hair into the case as opposed to out the back as reference designs do.

    Please provide more data. If this proves to be inconclusive I'd rather RMA the card if I were you than void my warranty by removing the heatsink.

    A picture of the insides of your case would be great, too. Maybe the fan sits too close to the PSU?


    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3kAm0MqKUNzaVJTRjBhTVNVeDA/edit?usp=sharing
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3kAm0MqKUNzcEI2YWhZdzMwa0E/edit?usp=sharing

    I know that I could move the hard disk lower, but that wouldn't make the GPU cool down by 10*C

    I don't have anything overclocked, other than RAM in BIOS.
    GPU voltage is 1075mV idle, 1200mV load.

    Where can I see how much Amps is the gpu using?
  7. Well, voltages are normal so that shouldn't be a problem. No need for Amps, then.

    Judging from your clock speeds it seems as if this might actually be the way the card is designed. Granted, it runs hotter than the review on http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Gigabyte/GeForce_GTX_770_WindForce_OC/31.html shows, but the clocks are where they should be.

    You could try to RMA it to see if you can get a card that runs cooler, but in its current state it seems to be stable and working as intended. I would be wary of dust though because dust buildup could push the card into throttling. This is, ultimately, your decision though.

    Your case has adequate space and ventilation therefore you would have a valid reason to RMA the card.
  8. Warrgarbl said:
    Well, voltages are normal so that shouldn't be a problem. No need for Amps, then.

    Judging from your clock speeds it seems as if this might actually be the way the card is designed. Granted, it runs hotter than the review on http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Gigabyte/GeForce_GTX_770_WindForce_OC/31.html shows, but the clocks are where they should be.

    You could try to RMA it to see if you can get a card that runs cooler, but in its current state it seems to be stable and working as intended. I would be wary of dust though because dust buildup could push the card into throttling. This is, ultimately, your decision though.

    Your case has adequate space and ventilation therefore you would have a valid reason to RMA the card.


    Hmm... But You don't see any way to find out what makes the card run at unacceptable temps idle and normal temps at load.

    I should also mention that my PC has been on for more than 12 hours now. It was turned on all night, but as far as I remember I've always had about 49*C idle temp, only I didn't know any way to find out what's wrong.
  9. We have already established that the card runs within its specifications (except temperature) which is all we can do without physically deconstructing the card to see if the heatsink fits flush. There is little else we can do to figure out what is going on without potentially voiding your warranty.

    The only other problem I could see is an inadequate fan speed curve. You can adjust this with Gigabyte's OC software called OC Guru. However you should be VERY careful to not touch core voltages or you could damage your card. The software would allow you to adjust the fan curve by setting the fan to a higher rpm at certain temperatures which will result in more noise but also lower temperatures.

    There still is the possibility though that your card has some kind of defect. Consider RMAing it nonetheless.
  10. maybe remove a few of the expansion slot covers on the chassis to make let cool air in directly below the card, may help a bit?
  11. Warrgarbl said:
    We have already established that the card runs within its specifications (except temperature) which is all we can do without physically deconstructing the card to see if the heatsink fits flush. There is little else we can do to figure out what is going on without potentially voiding your warranty.

    The only other problem I could see is an inadequate fan speed curve. You can adjust this with Gigabyte's OC software called OC Guru. However you should be VERY careful to not touch core voltages or you could damage your card. The software would allow you to adjust the fan curve by setting the fan to a higher rpm at certain temperatures which will result in more noise but also lower temperatures.

    There still is the possibility though that your card has some kind of defect. Consider RMAing it nonetheless.


    I have found the solution and cause for this problem. I noticed how in one test site the clocks were significantly lower on idle, and then I recalled that GPU's can lower the clocks automatically to limit power usage...
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3kAm0MqKUNzODRsenFwM3oxOXM/edit?usp=sharing

    I started looking for suspectable programs, and then I found a solution on the internet. It was my fault, I caused that, on Nvidia Control Panel I had changed the global setting for Power Management Mode to maximum performance, this caused the clocks to always stay at 1136MHz, even on idle.

    Now the card is 31*C idle. I wouldn't have done this without you, Warrgarbl, thanks! I would have just ignored the issue.
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