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Overclocking core 2 quad q9300

Last response: in Overclocking
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January 13, 2014 6:45:49 AM

yeah i know it's kind of a really old processor. And i am a noob in overclocking, dont ask y i want to overclock becuz i dont know myself y. here are system specs:
intel core 2 quad q9300
asus p5q mobo
corsair dominator 4gb 1066mhz
gigabyte hd 7750 2gb ddr3 oc to 930mhz
corsair tx650 power supply
i dont know anything about the overclocking of CPUs and i dont understand most of this guide http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/259899-29-core-over...
a step by step tutorial would be much appreciated
a b K Overclocking
January 17, 2014 4:58:11 AM

I've been tracking this thread and noticed no one has answered your question. Did you read the entire OC guide? I can help as I had a Q9550 overclocked, but I want to make sure you read the entire guide.

Edit: Do you have an aftermarket CPU cooler? If not, you will need one of those.
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January 17, 2014 8:38:01 AM

i have a freezer pro 7..
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January 17, 2014 8:39:54 AM

i tried to read it.. but at the middle things got a bit too much "Extreme" for me.. It'd be really gr8 if u could help me!
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a b K Overclocking
January 17, 2014 10:32:10 AM

Ok, first thing first. Overclocking (OC) is a trial and error process. When OC, you'll increase the clock and then test. It's not something that you can set and forget. It takes some time. Overclocking is limited by two things, temperature and stability. I personally don't like temperatures above 70C and I think that's a good start. High temperatures can and will damage parts. Typically, when temperatures get too high, your motherboard will automatically down clock the CPU and will PC eventually shutdown. Stability, i.e. unstable clocks, will cause your computer to crash. Also, don't expect your CPU to be superhuman that can do anything. Each chip is different. Just because you have read that someone with the same CPU was able to get to 3.8Ghz, doesn't mean your will be able to do the same.

You will need to download a temperature monitoring tool. I suggest RealTemp. I've used it for a little while now and it does a good job. http://www.techpowerup.com/realtemp/

I also suggest you download CPUZ. It is a information/monitoring tool for providing core clock and v-core voltage. http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-z.html

The concept in OC a Core2 (C2) processor is different from the new i-core Intels. You will overclock the C2 by increasing the Front Side Bus (FSB). The i-core processors change the multiplier. Your processor has a default FSB of 333 MHZ and a multiplier of 7.5. When you multiply those two components together, you get the core clock for your CPU. Thus 7.5 * 333 = 2497 MHz ~ 2.5Ghz. Now, I think a good first OC goal would be around 3.0 Ghz. If you decide to go higher, you can after you learn the process.

Memory. You do not want to overclock your memory. The default speed that the DDR2 module uses, is the max speed you will want to use. For example, If you have DDR2 800Mhz, you will want to take the 800Mhz and divide it by 2. That will tell you the max speed the memory module can run because memory is linked to the FSB. That means DDR2 800 can take a maximum FSB of 400Mhz. So in your case the maximum FSB your memory can take is 533 Mhz.

Now if you had the thought that since your memory can handle a FSB of 533, you can OC that FSB. No you can't at least not without some luck and water cooling. Based on your multiplier (7.5), that would a clock of 4 GHz (7.5 * 533 = 3999 MHz). I would be amazed if you were able to do that.

Now I said a good clock to start would be 3.0 GHz. Reversing the math, 3.0 GHz / 7.5 = 400 MHz so a FSB around 400 would achieve a OC near 3.0 GHz. Now, I know the difference between 333 and 400 is only 67 Mhz. But that's a decent first step OC.

Break 1. Still with me?
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January 17, 2014 10:44:21 AM

i'll try this tomorrow and get the results here.. Thanks for the reply though!!
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a b K Overclocking
January 17, 2014 10:45:52 AM

Salman Soomro said:
i'll try this tomorrow and get the results here.. Thanks for the reply though!!


I wasn't done. Just wanted to make sure you understood what I was saying. I haven't even told you how to test for stability.
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a b K Overclocking
January 17, 2014 12:21:57 PM

When you change the FSB, make sure your RAM doesn't exceed 1066 MHz.

To test stability, you'll need Prime95. http://www.mersenne.org/freesoft/ Yes the site looks stupid, but get the correct version for your OS.

After you overclock, you will want to run Prime95 for a few hours. Yes I said hours. Watch the temps and make sure the CPU doesn't get hot. If your PC crashes with Prime95, raise or lower the FSB a little and try again. That's a signal of instability.

Edit: Since you read the guide, I'm going to tell you to ignore the Vcore part for right now. You shouldn't need it for only 500 MHz.
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January 22, 2014 7:07:13 PM

okay so do i need to increase the pcie too in the ai tweaker menu? and fsb to northbridge does it have anything to do with overclocking
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a b K Overclocking
January 23, 2014 7:26:31 PM

No, don't increase the PCIe. Yes. You'll be changing the the FSB on the north bridge.
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February 15, 2014 1:12:08 AM

i overclocked it to 3.0 Ghz. but the maximum temps are now going upto 71 degrees!!
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a b K Overclocking
February 15, 2014 5:20:24 AM

Are the temps with Prime95 or a another program/game? Prime95 will torture your CPU beyond any program. Do you have proper airflow in your case?
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February 15, 2014 5:28:58 AM

have proper airflow.. and these temps are with prime 95 .. using real temp
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a b K Overclocking
February 15, 2014 6:29:15 AM

If that's what you get with Prime95, you'll be fine with other software.
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February 15, 2014 10:00:52 AM

and if i want to overclock more ?
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a b K Overclocking
February 15, 2014 10:39:48 AM

Salman Soomro said:
and if i want to overclock more ?


If you want to overclock to higher frequencies, you will have to change somethings with your build. Better case cooling, better CPU cooler etc.

One thing I forgot to mention. There are two temperatures for a CPU. The Tcase and Tjunction. Tjunction is the temperature per core. Tcase is the temperature for the entire CPU. There is a 5C difference in rating between them. The Tcase for the Q9300 is 71C. RealTemp measures Tjunction. So, if the max temp you see on RealTemp is 65C, the Tcase is 60C. So you have some playing room.

You didn't change the Vcore did you when you overclocked?

Good read here:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/256735-28-q9300-tempe...
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February 16, 2014 3:51:06 AM

no i didnt change the vcore.
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!