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A question on partitions

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January 13, 2014 6:38:29 PM

Hi guys

So I am trying to install a second copy of windows 7 onto my HDD. The original won't boot because I have upgraded my mobo. I thought if I booted from a win7 partition in some unused space on the disk, I could get into windows, access the files from the original installation of windows and extract them.

So I have 97 gig free on my HDD. I can get into diskpart. Should I create a primary, extended or logical partition to install windows on? Will I be able to access files from one partition to another? If it is possible, how do I use diskpart to do it (as in what commands to I plumb in?)




Thanks guys :) 

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a c 357 G Storage
January 13, 2014 8:24:37 PM

I am worried you do not understand the difference between unused space in an existing Partition (aka Free Space on your C: drive) and Unallocated Space on a HDD unit.

If your existing C: drive is a Partition on your HDD unit that does NOT occupy the full space of the HDD, then there will be Unallocated Space after it. Such space CAN be used by the Windows Install routine to Create a second Partition on the HDD and Install Win 7 there.

BUT if the "unused space" you refer to is Free Space in the C: drive, you can NOT use that to Install another Win 7 copy. It cannot be used to create a separate Partition if it is already part of a Partition.

Your problem may NOT need a new Installation of Win 7. Instead, you can try a process to fix the problem that often works, but not always. For this you need your Win 7 Install CD. You place it in your optical drive, ensure that the BIOS is set to boot from that optical drive, and boot. When the Install process starts up, do NOT do a normal Install. Instead, look for an option for a Repair Install or something like that. This process will survey all the devices in the current machine (with new mobo etc.), compare that to the drivers already installed on the HDD containing your Win 7 OS, and try to fix any mismatches by deleting unneeded drivers and adding required ones. When it is done you can remove the Install CD and reboot, and if all goes well, your machine will be able to boot because all the drivers needed are now available. In a few cases this process does NOT work. In a few cases it works EXCEPT that a few drivers still are missing. You find out about that by checking in Control Panel ... System ... Hardware ... Device Manager for any warnings of missing device drivers, and then installing missing ones manually. In many cases it all works very well and solves all your problems.
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January 13, 2014 8:45:37 PM

Paperdoc said:
I am worried you do not understand the difference between unused space in an existing Partition (aka Free Space on your C: drive) and Unallocated Space on a HDD unit.

If your existing C: drive is a Partition on your HDD unit that does NOT occupy the full space of the HDD, then there will be Unallocated Space after it. Such space CAN be used by the Windows Install routine to Create a second Partition on the HDD and Install Win 7 there.

BUT if the "unused space" you refer to is Free Space in the C: drive, you can NOT use that to Install another Win 7 copy. It cannot be used to create a separate Partition if it is already part of a Partition.

Your problem may NOT need a new Installation of Win 7. Instead, you can try a process to fix the problem that often works, but not always. For this you need your Win 7 Install CD. You place it in your optical drive, ensure that the BIOS is set to boot from that optical drive, and boot. When the Install process starts up, do NOT do a normal Install. Instead, look for an option for a Repair Install or something like that. This process will survey all the devices in the current machine (with new mobo etc.), compare that to the drivers already installed on the HDD containing your Win 7 OS, and try to fix any mismatches by deleting unneeded drivers and adding required ones. When it is done you can remove the Install CD and reboot, and if all goes well, your machine will be able to boot because all the drivers needed are now available. In a few cases this process does NOT work. In a few cases it works EXCEPT that a few drivers still are missing. You find out about that by checking in Control Panel ... System ... Hardware ... Device Manager for any warnings of missing device drivers, and then installing missing ones manually. In many cases it all works very well and solves all your problems.


Thanks for the second method of fixing the install - I am about to try that. I did shrink my partition holding the original install of windows down using diskpart to create 97gig of unallocated space. Thanks for clearing up the definitions for me though!



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