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Will this memory work with my motherboard?

Last response: in Memory
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a b V Motherboard
January 14, 2014 9:55:07 AM

Yes, no problem. But instead of buying some outdated memory why don't you invest on a new CPU/motherboard/RAM combo?
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January 14, 2014 1:14:12 PM

I want to place more memory so to go little faster (i believe 20$ is a small amount for bigger speed) i have also 2x kinston 1 gb on the motherboard and i am thinking adding 2x 2Gb so to have 6Gb spending only 20 $. If i change my motherboard i will have to change my CPU ith a better one right? thanks for the interest
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a c 1974 } Memory
a c 1559 V Motherboard
January 14, 2014 2:08:52 PM

Yes they should work fine as a set, with your other sticks it's a maybe, will prob have to increase DRAM and NB voltage a bit for all 4 sticks to work together
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a b V Motherboard
January 14, 2014 2:23:22 PM

giannisoli said:
I want to place more memory so to go little faster (i believe 20$ is a small amount for bigger speed) i have also 2x kinston 1 gb on the motherboard and i am thinking adding 2x 2Gb so to have 6Gb spending only 20 $. If i change my motherboard i will have to change my CPU ith a better one right? thanks for the interest


Yes that's a good upgrade for the money, but you should start to consider a "revolution" in your PC.
For $250 you could get a really nice CPU/motherboard/RAM upgrade.
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January 14, 2014 2:54:45 PM

Will there be any problem? Because the ram say Fits only AMD motherboard.
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a c 1974 } Memory
a c 1559 V Motherboard
January 14, 2014 3:05:47 PM

Should yes, haven't seen any DRAM that is specific to a chipset, might be slightly tuned, but should work
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January 15, 2014 11:57:19 AM

This is from my motherboard manual (page 2-13)

This motherboard does not support memory modules made up of 128 Mb chips or double sided x16 memory modules

And this from Wikipedia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DDR_SDRAM )

High density RAM

In the context of the 1 GB non-ECC PC3200 SDRAM module, there is very little visually to differentiate low density from high density RAM. High density DDR RAM modules will, like their low density counterparts, usually be double-sided with eight 512 Mbit chips per side. The difference is that for each chip, instead of being organized in a 64M×8 configuration, it is organized with 128 Mbits and a data width of 4 bits, or 128M×4.

High density memory modules are assembled using chips from multiple manufacturers. These chips come in both the familiar 22 × 10 mm (approx.) TSOP2 and smaller squarer 12 × 9 mm (approx.) FBGA package sizes. High density chips can be identified by the numbers on each chip.

High density RAM devices were designed to be used in registered memory modules for servers. JEDEC standards do not apply to high-density DDR RAM in desktop implementations.JEDEC's technical documentation, however, supports 128M×4 semiconductors as such that contradicts 128×4 being classified as high density. As such, high density is a relative term, which can be used to describe memory which is not supported by a particular motherboard's memory controller.
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January 16, 2014 1:32:07 AM

Plese response what would you do if you where in my place and you wouldn't have a lot of money?
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