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My friend thinks building a pc is more expensive than buying, and a lot harder.

Last response: in CPUs
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January 15, 2014 2:37:25 PM

we got into a huge argument about it
please tell me he is wrong

a b à CPUs
January 15, 2014 2:43:30 PM

Building a PC is not only less expensive, but you can buy specific premium components that have better warranties, longevity, stability, and better performance in general.
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January 15, 2014 2:44:09 PM

He's right.

it's REALLY easy to just walk into a store, pay for a PC, and walk out and then plug it in and go. way easier than building.
cheaper probably too, as the mfgs get volume pricing on everything, especially Win and intel/amd processors.

BUT - nowhere near as flexible.
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a c 737 à CPUs
January 15, 2014 2:44:35 PM

For a gaming rig, it is generally cheaper to build it yourself and there is nothing difficult about building it. Anyone that can read and comprehend instructions with pictures and a phillips screwdriver can build a PC.
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January 15, 2014 2:45:05 PM

It can be, but if you want maximum flexibility, a machine customized to your specific needs at the lowest cost, or if you want a high-end gaming system.

It isn't all that hard either, and can be done in a day.

The best part is that you don't have to deal with all of the bloatware that comes with a system someone else has built. Your's is clean and fast.
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January 15, 2014 2:49:13 PM

oh and this is for a 500$ pc too
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a b à CPUs
January 15, 2014 2:53:28 PM

kirby78339 said:
oh and this is for a 500$ pc too


I could build a $500 PC that would run circles around any OEM computer.
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a c 113 à CPUs
January 15, 2014 4:56:19 PM

allocco91 said:
kirby78339 said:
oh and this is for a 500$ pc too


I could build a $500 PC that would run circles around any OEM computer.

An OEM usually includes the OS; you need to include in the $500 build.
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a b à CPUs
January 15, 2014 5:15:37 PM

GhislainG said:
allocco91 said:
kirby78339 said:
oh and this is for a 500$ pc too


I could build a $500 PC that would run circles around any OEM computer.

An OEM usually includes the OS; you need to include in the $500 build.


PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-F2A88XM-HD3 Micro ATX FM2+ Motherboard ($74.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($84.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ OutletPC)
Case: Silverstone PS08B (Black) MicroATX Mid Tower Case ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA 500W 80+ Certified ATX Power Supply ($34.99 @ Microcenter)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NS90 DVD/CD Writer ($15.16 @ Mwave)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($82.98 @ OutletPC)
Other: AMD A10 7700K ($153.99)
Total: $522.07
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-15 20:14 EST-0500)

A couple of sales here and there, and you can make it happen!
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January 15, 2014 5:34:25 PM

Building your own is cheaper (personal experience), but it is a little harder, because of the time it takes to pick out the parts, but it's so worth it in the end.
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a c 737 à CPUs
January 16, 2014 8:20:49 AM

This would game far better than any OEM crap you could get off the shelf for $500. Not to mention it can be upgraded easily.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Pentium G3220 3.0GHz Dual-Core Processor ($62.00 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock H81M-HDS Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($49.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: GeIL EVO Veloce Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($62.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital RE3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($51.75 @ Amazon)
Video Card: PowerColor Radeon HD 7770 GHz Edition 1GB Video Card ($102.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Rosewill FBM-01 MicroATX Mini Tower Case ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Thermaltake TR2 500W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($39.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NS90 DVD/CD Writer ($15.16 @ Mwave)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($88.99 @ B&H)
Total: $503.84
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-16 11:20 EST-0500)
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January 16, 2014 10:08:17 AM

logainofhades said:
This would game far better than any OEM crap you could get off the shelf for $500. Not to mention it can be upgraded easily.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Pentium G3220 3.0GHz Dual-Core Processor ($62.00 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock H81M-HDS Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($49.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: GeIL EVO Veloce Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($62.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital RE3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($51.75 @ Amazon)
Video Card: PowerColor Radeon HD 7770 GHz Edition 1GB Video Card ($102.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Rosewill FBM-01 MicroATX Mini Tower Case ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Thermaltake TR2 500W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($39.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NS90 DVD/CD Writer ($15.16 @ Mwave)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($88.99 @ B&H)
Total: $503.84
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-16 11:20 EST-0500)


That's a good build. I can vouch for Haswell pentiums. I benchmarked it, same video card, and it almost beat my Phenom in L4D, but not Tomb Raider.

The board is another story. I've had two DOA's on H81 boards, one from ASRock. My ITX actually didn't have a USB 3.0 header, which was pretty disappointing. I couldn't get the iGPU multi monitor function to work on the other (dual monitor from both card and mobo). Throw in the fact that it only has 4 SATA connections, and I wouldn't even consider it. Just get a B85.
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a b à CPUs
January 16, 2014 11:19:12 AM

if you go for deals on manufacturer PCs, and are smart about it, you can never build a computer that price matches, the Windows Premium is often too much to handle.

however, the biggest advantage to building a PC instead is component balance, if someone wants to buy a PC to game, he can easily build an entry level one for 500 bucks like logainofhades and alloco91, while PC manufacturers will often go into the 700/800 range before even offering discrete GPU options.

if you just want a computer for work/productivity, you can easily find a coupon online and get a high end i5/low end i7 computer for about 500 bucks, which is literally impossible to beat for a self builder.

in summary, building your own gives flexibility and allows you to balance the components to your desires, which is VERY important for people looking to game.
Anything PC wise is expensive if you don't know what you're doing, as long as you are a smart buyer nothing is really all that expensive
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