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Building a new PC - what all can I carry over from my current storebought?

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January 16, 2014 5:01:28 PM

I'm looking to change over from my current store-bought PC to a custom-built one, but I've only got roughly 400 dollars to spend. I'm wondering what all I can move over from my current rig to my new one:

I've got a new hard drive and GPU that I bought for it, so I can move those over (1TB HDD and a Radeon HD 6870), and I think I can keep my sticks of RAM (about 6GB). Is there anything else I can move over? I also have a CPU I bought, but I think I need to upgrade it since it may be bottlenecking my GPU (AMD Phenom II X4 955 Black Edition). If it's not bottlenecking it, I can drop buying a new CPU and save a bit more money.
a c 124 à CPUs
January 17, 2014 5:19:30 AM

Commonly transferred components usually include; Optical Drives, Hard Drives, Peripherals (mouse, keyboard, printer) and (if high quality) PSU's. The Phenom II X4 955BE is a very good CPU and I highly doubt it is causing any bottlenecking on a 6870.
Here's what I came up with for an 'upgrade'

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($34.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Thermal Compound: Gelid Solutions GC-Extreme 3.5g Thermal Paste ($11.98 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Asus M5A99X EVO R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: GeIL EVO Veloce Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($62.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: OCZ ModXStream Pro 500W 80+ Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ Microcenter)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($88.99 @ B&H)
Total: $373.92
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-17 08:02 EST-0500)

Keeping your CPU, we change to an overclockable motherboard, add aftermarket cooling, include a high quality PSU (helps all the way around). I included ram only because it will work 'better' but it isn't a necessity. The OS is new since your license is very likely tied to the current motherboard and there is no case selected. IMO, cases are a personal choice thing since aesthetics plays a large role in choice, you're the one who's going to look at it every day, not me. One thing to note about case choice... the CM Hyper 212 EVO is a huge cooler at 160mm tall, I'll recommend a case at least 8" wide to ensure it'll fit. Also, the thermal compound I chose is about the best currently available but you could get Arctic Silver 5 (a very popular TIM) for a bit less

It's your thing though, ask questions, counter propose... this is just what I would look to do
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January 17, 2014 9:27:36 AM

C12Friedman said:
Commonly transferred components usually include; Optical Drives, Hard Drives, Peripherals (mouse, keyboard, printer) and (if high quality) PSU's. The Phenom II X4 955BE is a very good CPU and I highly doubt it is causing any bottlenecking on a 6870.
Here's what I came up with for an 'upgrade'

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($34.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Thermal Compound: Gelid Solutions GC-Extreme 3.5g Thermal Paste ($11.98 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Asus M5A99X EVO R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: GeIL EVO Veloce Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($62.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: OCZ ModXStream Pro 500W 80+ Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ Microcenter)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($88.99 @ B&H)
Total: $373.92
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-17 08:02 EST-0500)

Keeping your CPU, we change to an overclockable motherboard, add aftermarket cooling, include a high quality PSU (helps all the way around). I included ram only because it will work 'better' but it isn't a necessity. The OS is new since your license is very likely tied to the current motherboard and there is no case selected. IMO, cases are a personal choice thing since aesthetics plays a large role in choice, you're the one who's going to look at it every day, not me. One thing to note about case choice... the CM Hyper 212 EVO is a huge cooler at 160mm tall, I'll recommend a case at least 8" wide to ensure it'll fit. Also, the thermal compound I chose is about the best currently available but you could get Arctic Silver 5 (a very popular TIM) for a bit less

It's your thing though, ask questions, counter propose... this is just what I would look to do


This is what I ended up getting off the advice of a friend. The CPU is just meant to be an incremental upgrade, and I'll probably end up using a Linux distro over Windows.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor ($109.99 @ TigerDirect)
Motherboard: ASRock 960GM/U3S3 FX Micro ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($53.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Source 210 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($50.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: NZXT HALE82 550W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($85.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $300.94
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-17 12:26 EST-0500)
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a c 124 à CPUs
January 17, 2014 10:13:00 AM

My only feedback here is that the NZXT HALE82 V2 550W PSU is a little on the pricy side.
It looks like you're not intending to overclock so your part choices should work well I would think
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January 17, 2014 11:16:37 AM

If I were to want to overclock, would that work fine assuming I added some thermal paste/a CPU cooler?
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a c 124 à CPUs
January 17, 2014 2:38:55 PM

I think the motherboard with the 760G chipset will be the limiting factor in any overclocks (the main reason I suggested a 990 board) and UEIF BIOS (which is a friendlier BIOS interface) is not featured on that board (chipset does not allow for it). Another design limit would be the lack of cooling over the VRM (voltage regulator module) which is highly desired for overclocking.
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