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Computer repeatedly turns off and on

Last response: in Components
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January 17, 2014 12:24:25 AM

So my sister had asked me to look at her computer since it was lagging horribly. What I found out was that it had only 1GB of RAM so I got a 2GB stick and put it in. Now this is where the problems starts, I powered it on and it worked. Then I realized that I had a scrap CPU that had a 1 GHZ increase from hers, so I asked if she wanted to install that, she agreed. Then,
1) I took out the CPU and put it on
2) I also put the cooler from the other CPU into this PC
3) I power it on but it goes through the loop
4) I think it might be the thermal paste, but I don't have any, so I use toothpaste
5) It still has the same problem
What could be wrong with it? Thank you!
a b à CPUs
January 17, 2014 1:00:21 AM

Im just guessing "toothpaste" is an issue..... seriously man how the hell did you came up with that idea the only similarietes between thermal paste and toothpaste is that both are liquids in general.
To be honnest is someone thinks toothpaste is fine as a solution for cooling then I'd be very concerned giving him a PC hardware to play with.
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January 17, 2014 1:31:41 AM

Ra_V_en said:
Im just guessing "toothpaste" is an issue..... seriously man how the hell did you came up with that idea the only similarietes between thermal paste and toothpaste is that both are liquids in general.
To be honnest is someone thinks toothpaste is fine as a solution for cooling then I'd be very concerned giving him a PC hardware to play with.


I know it sounds stupid as hell, but I found it in the dark corners of the internet, and it had somewhat good results so I tried it. Besides, it was only a "This might work, so let's see" I was desperate man
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a b à CPUs
January 17, 2014 1:49:39 AM

Toothpaste most probably can conduct electricity which can lead to fatal distaster especially if it leaked over the motherboard pcb.
Ive also seen some some thermal paste tests with a suprises like toothpaste, but I've concidered it rather as a joke than a real world usage. Even if it wasn't a joke im pretty sure it wouldnt work for a long time, if it dries it has probably 0 thermal coductivity or even opposite effect.

There is tons of possible variables what could be wrong with your problem since you messed with the pc already:
- failed when swapping/adding ram ( bad ram stick)
- failed when swappig CPU (bad cpu)
- motherbord/cpu incompatibility
- damaged motherboard with your current "help"
- more and more

If the PC isnt throwing any sound from pc speaker its most probably motherboard/cpu fault, change back to the last working configuration and swap things one by one then check if its booting,
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a c 77 à CPUs
January 17, 2014 5:38:39 AM

What are the model numbers of the motherboard and CPUs you are using? The motherboard may need a BIOS update to support the new CPU, or it may not support it at all.
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January 18, 2014 2:10:32 PM

Ra_V_en said:
Toothpaste most probably can conduct electricity which can lead to fatal distaster especially if it leaked over the motherboard pcb.
Ive also seen some some thermal paste tests with a suprises like toothpaste, but I've concidered it rather as a joke than a real world usage. Even if it wasn't a joke im pretty sure it wouldnt work for a long time, if it dries it has probably 0 thermal coductivity or even opposite effect.

There is tons of possible variables what could be wrong with your problem since you messed with the pc already:
- failed when swapping/adding ram ( bad ram stick)
- failed when swappig CPU (bad cpu)
- motherbord/cpu incompatibility
- damaged motherboard with your current "help"
- more and more

If the PC isnt throwing any sound from pc speaker its most probably motherboard/cpu fault, change back to the last working configuration and swap things one by one then check if its booting,


Being the dumbass I am, I forgot to mention that I had mixed different brands of RAM together. The two new sticks I installed were clocked lower, so I looked on this forum to make sure. I read that it's okay to do that. But now, I checked again, and a different thread says there may be problems.. So I don't know..
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January 18, 2014 4:59:33 PM

shortstuff_mt said:
What are the model numbers of the motherboard and CPUs you are using? The motherboard may need a BIOS update to support the new CPU, or it may not support it at all.


I changed out the CPU's but it's still the same. I took out everything new, but it's still not working. I've reseated the whole system, but it's still the same thing too. I was thinking about switching out PSU's, would that work? The one on her's is 250W, which is really low..
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January 20, 2014 1:40:28 AM

shortstuff_mt said:
What are the model numbers of the motherboard and CPUs you are using? The motherboard may need a BIOS update to support the new CPU, or it may not support it at all.


So I've gone out and bought myself a new $13 MB and I've installed it. But now, it will go up to the Windows Splash Screen and shut back off again. Did I do something wrong?
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a c 77 à CPUs
January 20, 2014 9:39:28 AM

You will need to do a fresh OS install after installing the new motherboard.
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January 20, 2014 11:22:08 AM

shortstuff_mt said:
You will need to do a fresh OS install after installing the new motherboard.


How can I do this? This computer wasn't given any OS disks or anything. Should I do a 'legal' download on a HDD and boot it up from there?
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