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Best Gaming Desktop PC 2014 $500-$600?

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January 17, 2014 9:42:23 AM

I want to build a Gaming Desktop for quite some time, the problem is, I'm a big noob in picking parts, so I hope you guys could help me. I have a monitor, keyboard, mouse & OS, so those parts don't have to be included in the Part-List.

I want a PC for gaming and gaming only, like a sort of alternative for a console, so it has to be very strong in that category, but I would be happy to play Battlefield 4 on Medium Settings with no lag at all too. I'm planning to upgrade the parts after 2 years of time.

I play a big big number of games like: Minecraft, BF4, BF3, CoD Ghosts, The Elder Scrolls: Online, Need for Speed: Rivals, etc. etc. so a good and big hard-drive should be important too I guess.

Please try to explain it as simple as possible, because I've never built one before.

Thanks so much for helping me out, I will name the built after the person that gave me the best Part-List and instructions. I'll send a picture of it sprayed on the side of my built through PM! haha :) 
a c 248 4 Gaming
January 17, 2014 9:47:48 AM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor ($109.99 @ TigerDirect)
Motherboard: MSI 970A-G46 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($79.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: GeIL EVO Veloce Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($62.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital RE3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($50.44 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Asus Radeon R9 270 2GB Video Card ($194.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Sentey CS1-1398 PLUS ATX Mid Tower Case ($34.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Rosewill Hive 550W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $608.35
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-17 12:46 EST-0500)


Will beat the new console performance handily. Will be able to handle High on pretty much everything, some on Ultra (like Skyrim, NFS)
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Best solution

a b 4 Gaming
January 17, 2014 9:47:52 AM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor ($109.99 @ TigerDirect)
Motherboard: ASRock 970 Extreme3 R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($64.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: GeIL EVO Veloce Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($62.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Hitachi Ultrastar 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($46.44 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($234.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Rosewill Galaxy-01 ATX Mid Tower Case ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 430W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($19.99 @ Microcenter)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Microcenter)
Total: $585.37
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-17 12:47 EST-0500)
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January 17, 2014 10:30:01 AM

ScrewySqrl said:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor ($109.99 @ TigerDirect)
Motherboard: ASRock 970 Extreme3 R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($64.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: GeIL EVO Veloce Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($62.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Hitachi Ultrastar 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($46.44 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($234.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Rosewill Galaxy-01 ATX Mid Tower Case ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 430W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($19.99 @ Microcenter)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Microcenter)
Total: $585.37
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-17 12:47 EST-0500)


Amazing list! Thanks, does it have enough power to handle the amount of Wattage though?

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a b 4 Gaming
January 17, 2014 10:34:16 AM

yes, the corsair CX450 has 30 amps on the 12v rail, overall use is about 360-375W
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January 17, 2014 10:36:45 AM

ScrewySqrl said:
yes, the corsair CX450 has 30 amps on the 12v rail, overall use is about 360-375W


Okay thanks, I'm going to build it soon. :) 

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January 17, 2014 10:47:07 AM

ScrewySqrl said:
yes, the corsair CX450 has 30 amps on the 12v rail, overall use is about 360-375W


Last question: Is a 6-core CPU better than a quad-core?
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a c 248 4 Gaming
January 17, 2014 11:06:58 AM

Yes, the FX-6300 is a great budget CPU
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a b 4 Gaming
January 18, 2014 3:29:46 AM

the 6300 is probably *the* budget CPU for the last 4 months or so
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January 18, 2014 4:30:20 AM

Go with R9 270X instead of GTX760.
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January 18, 2014 7:00:06 AM

Antares88 said:
Go with R9 270X instead of GTX760.


The R9 270X is 30$ cheaper but the GTX760 is better than the 270X, so it's worth the money. And I have changed the 760 for a 770 now, that is 1,4x more powerful

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January 19, 2014 9:56:58 AM

It really depends where 760 beats the 270X. In bf4 for example 270X beats the 760
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a c 248 4 Gaming
January 19, 2014 10:58:36 AM

The 270x does not beat the 760 in bf4... It may once mantle comes out but we don't know when that is or how much mantle will help in the real world.
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March 21, 2014 5:32:00 PM

ScrewySqrl said:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor ($109.99 @ TigerDirect)
Motherboard: ASRock 970 Extreme3 R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($64.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: GeIL EVO Veloce Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($62.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Hitachi Ultrastar 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($46.44 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($234.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Rosewill Galaxy-01 ATX Mid Tower Case ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 430W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($19.99 @ Microcenter)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Microcenter)
Total: $585.37
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-17 12:47 EST-0500)


Would this build be able to run WOW on ultra?? (World of Warcraft)
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a c 248 4 Gaming
March 21, 2014 6:45:57 PM

Definitely, but please do not get the CX430 with this build. It's not built strong enough. Antecs 620w HCG is on sale right now and is much, much better for this build.
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April 21, 2014 7:43:36 PM

You can also use a EVGA gtx 750ti ftw edition if u want to save some money, its 170$. It is a awesome gpu for the price
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a c 248 4 Gaming
April 21, 2014 8:11:44 PM

Jason Zhou said:
You can also use a EVGA gtx 750ti ftw edition if u want to save some money, its 170$. It is a awesome gpu for the price


Or get the exact same performance and buy evga's regular 750 Ti for $20 less and overclock yourself. If you're going budget oriented, there's no need to spend $20 extra for the exact same card.
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April 30, 2014 8:57:26 PM

GPU: AMD fx-8350 4.0 GHz 8-core processor- $189.99 @Amazon
Cooler: Noctua NH D-14- $24.99 @ Newegg
Graphics Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti- $699.99 ( Buy 2 extras [your upgrades] for pure excellence) @Amazon
Motherboard: ASRock 990 Extreme9-$169.99 @Newegg
System Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 8GB 1866MHz-$79.99 @Newegg
OS Drive: Kingston V300 Series 240 GB SSD-$99.99 @Amazon (COMPLETELY OPTIONAL- RECOMMENDED)
Storage Device: Seagate Barracuda 2TB Hard Drive- $87.25 @Amazon
Case: NZXT Phantom 410- $99.99 @Newegg
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA 1000W 80+ Gold Fully Modular- $172.99 @Amazon
Operating System: Windows 8.1- $94.98 @OutletPC
4k Ultra HD Monitor: Dell Ultrasharp UP 2414Q- $949.99 @accessories.dell.us
In my opinion, this is one of the most perfect builds I can think if for a gaming PC. Before anyone says anything, yes, I know the budget is $500-600. But this is THE BEST PC I've built. You can't go wrong with it. Of course, that's if you've got the cash. This PC without upgrades is about $2500 and with upgrades with $4000. If you do decide to build this, I highly suggest you get the two extra EVGA's. I game like Crisis can give one EVGA GeForce a heart attack. yet I play on HIGH settings all the time on Crisis 3 with the upgrades.

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May 5, 2014 5:01:35 PM

HiTechObsessed said:
Jason Zhou said:
You can also use a EVGA gtx 750ti ftw edition if u want to save some money, its 170$. It is a awesome gpu for the price


Or get the exact same performance and buy evga's regular 750 Ti for $20 less and overclock yourself. If you're going budget oriented, there's no need to spend $20 extra for the exact same card.


HiTech, you seem to know what you are doing so I was wondering if you think that this build would be a good $500-700 budget computer. I would like to use it for gaming and with all prices together I found it would be $708.05. The link is below :D  Thanks in advance.
http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3EBoG
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a c 248 4 Gaming
May 7, 2014 6:54:49 AM

Can tweak stuff around a little bit. With gaming as the main consideration, you want to focus a budget build on getting you a better GPU. The R7 265 will be greatly better than the 640, and will get you around high settings at 1080p :)  You can check out the benchmarks below from Anandtech and the 265's performance.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4440 3.1GHz Quad-Core Processor ($184.98 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper TX3 54.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($18.16 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: MSI H81M-P33 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($49.99 @ Mwave)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Hitachi Ultrastar 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($48.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: MSI Radeon R7 265 2GB Video Card ($149.99 @ Newegg)
Case: HEC Vigilance MicroATX Mini Tower Case ($25.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Rosewill Hive 550W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
Keyboard: Logitech K360 Wireless Standard Keyboard ($19.99 @ TigerDirect)
Total: $698.04
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-05-07 09:52 EDT-0400)


265 benchmarks: http://www.anandtech.com/show/7764/the-nvidia-geforce-g...

As you can see, the 265 gets pretty good performance even at High settings at 1080p :)  The 640 is really only good for low-medium.
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May 7, 2014 5:22:58 PM

HiTechObsessed said:
Can tweak stuff around a little bit. With gaming as the main consideration, you want to focus a budget build on getting you a better GPU. The R7 265 will be greatly better than the 640, and will get you around high settings at 1080p :)  You can check out the benchmarks below from Anandtech and the 265's performance.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4440 3.1GHz Quad-Core Processor ($184.98 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper TX3 54.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($18.16 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: MSI H81M-P33 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($49.99 @ Mwave)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Hitachi Ultrastar 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($48.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: MSI Radeon R7 265 2GB Video Card ($149.99 @ Newegg)
Case: HEC Vigilance MicroATX Mini Tower Case ($25.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Rosewill Hive 550W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
Keyboard: Logitech K360 Wireless Standard Keyboard ($19.99 @ TigerDirect)
Total: $698.04
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-05-07 09:52 EDT-0400)


265 benchmarks: http://www.anandtech.com/show/7764/the-nvidia-geforce-g...

As you can see, the 265 gets pretty good performance even at High settings at 1080p :)  The 640 is really only good for low-medium.


Thanks for the ideas. Yet in the end after talking to some friends and following what I thought was the right path I decided to change my build completely. Instead of the 265, I decided to try out the GeForce GTX 750 Ti. If you were curious about the new build here is a link, thanks for the help :) 

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3FNsg
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a c 248 4 Gaming
May 7, 2014 5:48:37 PM

Have you already bought it? The 265 is noticeable better for the same price. And if you haven't bought it yet I would change out the APU. The APU runs a poor quality CPU. I also wouldn't pay that much for the power supply, that's crazy expensive.
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May 15, 2014 3:47:25 PM

HiTechObsessed said:
Have you already bought it? The 265 is noticeable better for the same price. And if you haven't bought it yet I would change out the APU. The APU runs a poor quality CPU. I also wouldn't pay that much for the power supply, that's crazy expensive.


No I haven't thanks for the tips changed it and plan on building soon.
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May 26, 2014 3:39:54 PM

HiTechObsessed said:
Can tweak stuff around a little bit. With gaming as the main consideration, you want to focus a budget build on getting you a better GPU. The R7 265 will be greatly better than the 640, and will get you around high settings at 1080p :)  You can check out the benchmarks below from Anandtech and the 265's performance.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4440 3.1GHz Quad-Core Processor ($184.98 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper TX3 54.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($18.16 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: MSI H81M-P33 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($49.99 @ Mwave)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Hitachi Ultrastar 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($48.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: MSI Radeon R7 265 2GB Video Card ($149.99 @ Newegg)
Case: HEC Vigilance MicroATX Mini Tower Case ($25.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Rosewill Hive 550W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
Keyboard: Logitech K360 Wireless Standard Keyboard ($19.99 @ TigerDirect)
Total: $698.04
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-05-07 09:52 EDT-0400)


265 benchmarks: http://www.anandtech.com/show/7764/the-nvidia-geforce-g...

As you can see, the 265 gets pretty good performance even at High settings at 1080p :)  The 640 is really only good for low-medium.


I really love this thread I'm also looking for a gaming desktop but also one that would be good for rendering videos would this same set up be viable for me as a gamer and video editor?
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June 27, 2014 1:53:48 AM

ScrewySqrl said:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor ($109.99 @ TigerDirect)
Motherboard: ASRock 970 Extreme3 R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($64.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: GeIL EVO Veloce Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($62.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Hitachi Ultrastar 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($46.44 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($234.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Rosewill Galaxy-01 ATX Mid Tower Case ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 430W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($19.99 @ Microcenter)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Microcenter)
Total: $585.37
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-17 12:47 EST-0500)


Low Wattage ..
this is what i need in low budget and low wattage ... ...
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June 30, 2014 3:22:47 PM

@ pouryafasih

just to let you know, if you buy all your parts at tiger direct and let them build it for you (don't do the OS installation save yourself the 80bucks n do that part yourself) but if anything were to fail within the first year of your build, they gotta fix it for free, and if you buy the extended warranty (ask for the basic not the premium) if in 3 years any of your hardware fails they will replace it with the same model or equal, (example, if mobo fails, and they don't have anymore say 1155 socket boards, they have to give you the next best thing 1150 and then because of that, they'll give you a new processor equal to the current one).

id say ask them if they will provide the same coverage for parts that you might buy elsewhere like amazon, newegg, or local stores, if they provide same coverage then that would be pretty cool....

my only concern is, if you've never build a pc before, there's a risk you may bend the pins on your motherboard (or cpu for amd? i duno), in anycase, if you do decide to build it yourself (the one you got there looks pretty nice) just be patient, and please make sure your grounded.

good luck
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July 7, 2014 4:57:37 PM

i just wanted to know if
1. this is legit (just to be sure)
2. Great computer for hardcore games
3. How long will it be usable?
Reply at maniacmonkey10@hotmail.com please and thannk you for spending your time to upload this and reply
-Richard S.
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July 7, 2014 5:05:29 PM

Will a
Rosewill Black Gaming ATX Mid Tower Computer Case CHALLENGER work instead of the other case?
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a b 4 Gaming
July 7, 2014 8:48:40 PM

maniacmonkey10 said:
Will a
Rosewill Black Gaming ATX Mid Tower Computer Case CHALLENGER work instead of the other case?


Yes. Back in 2010, the Challenger was a Tom's Recommended value buy. Get the Challenger U3 and add the extra fans to max its airflow, and you won't regret it one bit

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July 13, 2014 9:57:24 AM

LcplVasquez Edwin said:
HiTechObsessed said:
Can tweak stuff around a little bit. With gaming as the main consideration, you want to focus a budget build on getting you a better GPU. The R7 265 will be greatly better than the 640, and will get you around high settings at 1080p :)  You can check out the benchmarks below from Anandtech and the 265's performance.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4440 3.1GHz Quad-Core Processor ($184.98 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper TX3 54.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($18.16 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: MSI H81M-P33 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($49.99 @ Mwave)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Hitachi Ultrastar 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($48.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: MSI Radeon R7 265 2GB Video Card ($149.99 @ Newegg)
Case: HEC Vigilance MicroATX Mini Tower Case ($25.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Rosewill Hive 550W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
Keyboard: Logitech K360 Wireless Standard Keyboard ($19.99 @ TigerDirect)
Total: $698.04
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-05-07 09:52 EDT-0400)


265 benchmarks: http://www.anandtech.com/show/7764/the-nvidia-geforce-g...

As you can see, the 265 gets pretty good performance even at High settings at 1080p :)  The 640 is really only good for low-medium.


I really love this thread I'm also looking for a gaming desktop but also one that would be good for rendering videos would this same set up be viable for me as a gamer and video editor?


I would say for video editing amp up to a i7 for the hyper threading. You can still render on 15 but it would be a bit slower.
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August 2, 2014 6:43:25 AM

Umeed said:
@ pouryafasih

my only concern is, if you've never build a pc before, there's a risk you may bend the pins on your motherboard (or cpu for amd? i duno), in anycase, if you do decide to build it yourself (the one you got there looks pretty nice) just be patient, and please make sure your grounded.

good luck


I have to second this advice. 1): ground yourself; 2) do not build on a carpet; 3) have a can of compressed air handy; 4) do not ever use a vacuum cleaner to clean dust; 5) watch them pins; 6) take it slow and enjoy the process
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!