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What PSU should I get for my first build?

I have been told that named PSUs are the best option but they are a lot more expensive. My system needs a 600 watt PSU but all of the named PSUs like corsair, cooler mater are very expensive. Do you know what a good 600watt PSU would be because I found a cheap £25 non named psu that was 750 watt but I have been told that they are unreliable. The named PSUs I am looking at are around £60.
Thanks in advance.
28 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about psu build
  1. No, that is probably the worst decision you can make. ALWAYS buy a quality unit. If you buy a junk unit and it fails, it can ruin every single component in your computer.
  2. Please describe your build. You may not actually need 600W. By the way, budget CM PSUs are generally only a notch or two above junk themselves. Their new V-series is built by Seasonic, but most anything else (except their top-end stuff) should be avoided, especially anything with "Extreme" in its name, and all of the GX line except the GX-450. XFX offers Seasonic-built units, and they are typically not too expensive. Please list your parts though; a lot of people overestimate the wattage they need.
  3. The PSU is not the place to skimp when building a computer. Using a cheap low quality power supply could cost you alot more down the road when you have to replace a bunch of parts that the PSU damaged.
  4. PCU's are really important, if it fails, your computer is ruined. Buy a Seasonic (expensive) or a XTX, Corsair, and if you want really cheap and still reliable but of a less better quality, buy a Logisys.
  5. PCU? XTX?
  6. FALC0N said:
    PCU? XTX?


    oops.
  7. Logisys offers PSU-shaped objects that are among the worst you can buy. What very few competent technical reviews I've ever found on them tend to end in smoke and flames.
    Upper-range Corsair is good, but the "CX" line is only mediocre. They are built by CWT using some inferior Samxon capacitors that don't take heat very well and degrade early.
  8. pouryafasih said:
    PCU's are really important, if it fails, your computer is ruined. Buy a Seasonic (expensive) or a XTX, Corsair, and if you want really cheap and still reliable but of a less better quality, buy a Logisys.


    Logisys would be one of the brands to avoid.
  9. pouryafasih said:
    PCU's are really important, if it fails, your computer is ruined. Buy a Seasonic (expensive) or a XTX, Corsair, and if you want really cheap and still reliable but of a less better quality, buy a Logisys.


    Sorry, but Logisys is about as bad as you can get. They are TERRIBLE.
  10. Onus said:
    Logisys offers PSU-shaped objects that are among the worst you can buy. What very few competent technical reviews I've ever found on them tend to end in smoke and flames.
    Upper-range Corsair is good, but the "CX" line is only mediocre. They are built by CWT using some inferior Samxon capacitors that don't take heat very well and degrade early.


    How early, like in 2 years?
  11. I would consider someone 'very lucky' to get 2 years out of a CX unit. Just recently there was a thread about someone who had a cx750 fail and ruin their computer, and MY OWN first build was blown up by a cx600.
  12. tiny voices said:
    I would consider someone 'very lucky' to get 2 years out of a CX unit. Just recently there was a thread about someone who had a cx750 fail and ruin their computer, and MY OWN first build was blown up by a cx600.


    But the CX500M had tons of good reviews
  13. People think that because it is corsair and has good quality cables and is partially modular that it is actually a quality unit. Unfortunately it is not and is prone to very early failure. There are plenty of threads showing them failing and most reviewers address the poor quality capacitors and explain that they do not take heat well and fail early.
  14. tiny voices said:
    I would consider someone 'very lucky' to get 2 years out of a CX unit. Just recently there was a thread about someone who had a cx750 fail and ruin their computer, and MY OWN first build was blown up by a cx600.


    And the Corsair Gaming 600W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply?
  15. Initially, the Corsair CX review quite well. Their problem is they don't hold up. Probably safe in light-duty office builds, in gamers that can run hot, they croak early.
  16. The GS units are better than the CX units but by no means are they "great". I would stay away from them. There are MUCH better options for the same price from XFX, Antec, Seasonic.
  17. Yeah I think the SeaSonic 520W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply is the best I can get for my build that needs a minimum of 500W. Cheap and everyone loves SeaSonic PSU's (SeaSonic M12II 520 Bronze)
  18. We're still awaiting the OP's parts list so we know how much wattage he really needs.
  19. pouryafasih said:
    Yeah I think the SeaSonic 520W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply is the best I can get for my build that needs a minimum of 500W. Cheap and everyone loves SeaSonic PSU's (SeaSonic M12II 520 Bronze)


    What is your build?
  20. tiny voices said:
    pouryafasih said:
    Yeah I think the SeaSonic 520W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply is the best I can get for my build that needs a minimum of 500W. Cheap and everyone loves SeaSonic PSU's (SeaSonic M12II 520 Bronze)


    What is your build?


    CPU: AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor
    Motherboard: ASRock 970 Extreme3 R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard
    Memory: GeIL EVO Veloce Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory
    Storage: Hitachi Ultrastar 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM
    GPU: Zotac GeForce GTX 760 2GB
    Case: Rosewill Galaxy-01 ATX Mid Tower
    PSU: SeaSonic 520W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX
    Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer
  21. The CX are fine for the money. People keep saying there are better units for the same price range. Sometimes true, but not at the same output level. I have seen the CX430 for as little as $20 after rebate and the CX750 for $50. Finding better at those prices is next to impossible. But spending an extra $20 to $30 can bring a substantial improvement in quality.
  22. tiny voices said:
    I would consider someone 'very lucky' to get 2 years out of a CX unit. Just recently there was a thread about someone who had a cx750 fail and ruin their computer, and MY OWN first build was blown up by a cx600.


    I was going to get a corsair cx 600 but what should i get know is this cooler master one any good? http://www.amazon.co.uk/Cooler-Master-B-Series-Single-Supply/dp/B00B8EQE7K/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_nC?ie=UTF8&colid=2C8DHQWYRWCIY&coliid=I2N4ECI6BWZRLL
  23. Onus said:
    Please describe your build. You may not actually need 600W. By the way, budget CM PSUs are generally only a notch or two above junk themselves. Their new V-series is built by Seasonic, but most anything else (except their top-end stuff) should be avoided, especially anything with "Extreme" in its name, and all of the GX line except the GX-450. XFX offers Seasonic-built units, and they are typically not too expensive. Please list your parts though; a lot of people overestimate the wattage they need.


    my build is going to be
    intel i5 4670k
    gigabyte Z87X-D3H
    MSI geforce gtx 770 twin frozr lightning superclocked
    Crucial Ballistix tactical 8gb RAM
    Coolermaster hyper 212 evo
    Zalman Z11 case with 5 case fans
  24. Best answer
    No, do not get that coolermaster.

    Get this: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004RJ8EKI/?tag=pcp0f-21 SUBSTANTIALLY better quality.
  25. Yes, it is.
  26. tiny voices said:
    No, do not get that coolermaster.

    Get this: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004RJ8EKI/?tag=pcp0f-21 SUBSTANTIALLY better quality.


    thats great but i would need a 600 watt psu though.
  27. Get the 650w version. And technically no, your build will easily run on 550w with room to spare.
  28. I'd choose a Corsair CX before any budget CM PSU, and just make sure I gave it plenty of air to stay cool; but I agree with Tiny Voices; a Seasonic-built 550W XFX is an excellent choice for that build.
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