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Need to figure out how big of a power supply I need.

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January 19, 2014 7:16:09 PM

As the title says I need to find out how big of a power supply I need. I am doing a new build from the ground up. I have gone to several websites that claim to be power supply calculators and when putting in everything the same on all websites I have received ranges from 750 watt to 1400 watt. If someone could give me a little more of a clear answer that would be great. Here is the build

Motherboard: http://

CPU http://

GPU http://

SSD http://

HDD http://

Drive http://

Ram http://

Case http://

Replacement Fans http://

Additional Information:

I do need the Power Supply big enough to eventually handle 2 of the Asus GTX 780's in sli. Also I plan on eventually upgrading the ram to 32 gb instead of just 16gb depending on if the 16 gb will work for video editing. If I am correct though the size of the ram sticks should change the power consumption. I didn't list the OS but it will be running windows 8.1 professional. As far as USB devices go I will have my webcam, keyboard, mouse, game pad, Cell phone charging cable and possibly my wireless Internet adapter depending on whether I just get an internal one.

I believe that's everything. Like I said if someone could help me figure out how big of a P/S I will need that would be really helpful so I can finish this build.
Thank you guys in advance.
January 19, 2014 7:19:12 PM

Go here: http://us.msi.com/service/power-supply-calculator/. Put your computer info in for the components your looking at and it will give you a calculated maximum power consumption for all components collectively. This will be the minimum power supply wattage that you should look into. You have to account for 80 Plus ratings as well so make sure you at least get an 80+ Bronze for the setup you're looking at. Here's a link to my tutorial about what to look for when purchasing a PSU as well as installation and cable management info: http://www.tomshardware.com/faq/id-1936217/install-powe...

Let me know if you have any other questions.
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January 19, 2014 7:34:27 PM

Blankie440 said:
Go here: http://us.msi.com/service/power-supply-calculator/. Put your computer info in for the components your looking at and it will give you a calculated maximum power consumption for all components collectively. This will be the minimum power supply wattage that you should look into. You have to account for 80 Plus ratings as well so make sure you at least get an 80+ Bronze for the setup you're looking at. Here's a link to my tutorial about what to look for when purchasing a PSU as well as installation and cable management info: http://www.tomshardware.com/faq/id-1936217/install-powe...

Let me know if you have any other questions.


Same problem I had as last time with the msi calculator. It doesn't have the CPU I am buying listed and they don't have an SSD selection.

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January 19, 2014 7:44:34 PM

All you have to do is find an equivalent power rating CPU for an idea of your overall power consumption. Same with the SSD, in a way, just list them as HDD's as SSD's use less power than HDD's so you should be able to get a rough estimate of your total power consumption. It shouldn't range from 750W to 1400W unless you are changing around your GPU setup substantially. The power consumption for the RAM modules based on capacity is minimal.

Get an estimate for your system the way you want it to be in the end (SLI and all) and let that power rating guide you to a suitable PSU.
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January 19, 2014 8:07:34 PM

Blankie440 said:
All you have to do is find an equivalent power rating CPU for an idea of your overall power consumption. Same with the SSD, in a way, just list them as HDD's as SSD's use less power than HDD's so you should be able to get a rough estimate of your total power consumption. It shouldn't range from 750W to 1400W unless you are changing around your GPU setup substantially. The power consumption for the RAM modules based on capacity is minimal.

Get an estimate for your system the way you want it to be in the end (SLI and all) and let that power rating guide you to a suitable PSU.


To be completely honest the reason I came here looking for advice on what people thought I should get is because when I have tried all of the other websites It gives me that huge range between what I need. I was hoping more so that someone experienced with computers would be able to give me a rough estimate of what I need for the build. Thank you for the advice though I will keep checking out websites to see if I can it least get 2 or 3 different sites telling me the same thing.

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January 19, 2014 8:12:58 PM

If you're worried about consistency between power supply calculator web sites then that is another issue. I have used MSI's calculator time and again for years and it beats checking out every components specs sheet, which can be cumbersome to find, then adding it all up yourself. Their calculator takes a database of those specs and provides you with the approximate maximum power consumption.

If you want someone to go through your entire list and pick out the power requirement for each through the specs sheet then have fun because that is unnecessary. Stick with MSI's calculator for an accurate approximation of your maximum power requirements and go from there. Nothing more to it than that.
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Best solution

a c 1919 ) Power supply
January 19, 2014 9:02:21 PM

Seasonic made \ Gold Certified \ FULL Modular

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($124.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $124.99
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-20 00:01 EST-0500)
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