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Computer won't turn on new build, Ethernet port goes on but turns off

I just built a new PC , I'm a beginner to building but the question my PC turns on for a few seconds but then turn off ...
It will turn on but after a few seconds it turn off. Will it be the power is not enought ? NO Graphics card are installed or used.

my part are....


Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty Z87 Killer LGA 1150 Intel Z87 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157460

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K Haswell 3.5GHz LGA 1150 84W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116901

Power supply: Solid Gear Basix 500W Power Supply - 120mm Fan, Supports Dual and Quad Core CPU - SDGR-500BX
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=8533108
3 answers Last reply Best Answer
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  1. Start with this. Maybe you overlooked something:

    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/274745-31-step-step-guide-building

    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-perform-steps-posting-post-boot-video-problems

    But you should replace that power supply. It seems like you picked the cheapest one you could find. On the other end, you picked a very high-end CPU like the i7-4770K. It's never a good idea to go too cheap on the PSU. Remember that your power supply feeds power to all other components inside, so last thing you need is a cheap unit causing system instability or worst damaging other components.

    You should get a power supply from a trusted manufacturer like: Antec, XFX, Corsair, Seasonic, PC Power & Cooling, etc...
  2. But isn't 500 watts enough to power this PC ? I mean i'm not thinking about gaming or do serious stuff with it ..
  3. Best answer
    cristianhernandez said:
    But isn't 500 watts enough to power this PC ? I mean i'm not thinking about gaming or do serious stuff with it ..


    That's not the point. Electricity is never stable and fluctuate all the time. A cheap PSU will be more sensible to fluctuation and won't deliver power to your other components with the same stability compared to a high-end model. Also, cheap PSUs will rarely deliver as much power as advertised, like even if it says it's a 500W model it might not be able to deliver more than 275W reliably for example. I'm not saying your PSU is the problem, but you play with fire by choosing the cheapest no-name unit you could find.

    For instance, I paid 150$ for my PSU and you paid 25$ for yours. We're talking 6 times the price so don't expect the same level of performance. The number of Watt doesn't tell anything on the quality. Just like with a car, more HP doesn't mean more reliability. I could show you some PSU with the same number of Watts as yours (500 in your case) but price will vary a lot depending on the quality. I'm not saying you have to overspend especially if you're on a tight budget. But at least you could have got something more decent between 50$ and 60$ from an a trusted brand. Below that you're just playing with fire. Even if the PC might work at first, who knows when something will fail because of that cheap PSU?

    As I said, I'm not sure the problem is the PSU. Start with the 2 guides I posted before and see if you forgot something else. But if you can borrow a better PSU from a friend it would be worth to try it to see if the computer starts with another PSU.
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