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Never used Liquid Cooling systems, some help please

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  • Water Cooling
  • CPUs
  • Systems
  • Components
  • GPUs
  • Liquid+Cooling+system
Last response: in Components
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January 20, 2014 4:30:40 PM

Im currently building a PC and i've never used Liquid Cooling systems before. I'm wondering if i need to have one and how does it works ?

If you have any good one to used i would appreciate some recommendations.

Since it's the final step before buying my pc i can tell you my pc components. Im using my pc for After Effects, Adobe Premiere, Adobe Photoshop, Nuke, NukeX, Mari, Wysiwyg, AutoCad, 3Ds, Sketch Up and Blender.

Chasis : X-Titan 200 FullTower
Extra Case Fan : Maximum Enermax 120 MM (1000 RPM)
Noise Reduction Technology : Sound Absorbing Foam
CPU : I7 4930K Six-Core 3.40 GHz 12MB
Motherboard : ASUS P9X79 LE ATX
RAM : 32GB (8x4) DDR3/1866MHz Quad Channel
Video Card : NVIDIA GeForce GTX 770 4Gb DDR5 (EVGA ACX Coolling Edition)
Power Supply : 800 Watts - Standard 80 Plus
Hard Drive 1 : 120Gb Corsair Neutron
Hard Drive 2 : 1 TB SATA-III
Optical Drive : LG 14X
Sound Card : Asus Xonar DX

Thanks in advance. If you have any advice for my pc and think i may have to change some stuff i'd like to know it !

More about : liquid cooling systems

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a c 380 à CPUs
January 20, 2014 4:42:22 PM

I do not much like all in one liquid coolers when a good air cooler can do the job.
A liquid cooler will be expensive, noisy, less reliable, and will not cool any better
in a well ventilated case.
Liquid cooling is really air cooling, it just puts the heat exchange in a different place.
The orientation of the radiator will cause a problem.
If you orient it to take in cool air from the outside, you will cool the cpu better, but the hot air then circulates inside the case heating up the graphics card and motherboard.
If you orient it to exhaust(which I think is better) , then your cpu cooling will be less effective because it uses pre heated case air.
And... I have read too many tales of woe when a liquid cooler leaks.
google "H100 leak"

I would use a noctua cooler with a 140mm fan.

The build looks good.

I think 120gb is a bit small for the "C" drive ssd.
I would use 240gb

I would insist on a quality power supply.
Here is such a list:http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/thread/323050.aspx

Onboard HD 7.1 sound is very good. Do you really have the speakers and a good ear to require a discrete sound card?
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January 20, 2014 4:50:07 PM

geofelt said:
I do not much like all in one liquid coolers when a good air cooler can do the job.
A liquid cooler will be expensive, noisy, less reliable, and will not cool any better
in a well ventilated case.
Liquid cooling is really air cooling, it just puts the heat exchange in a different place.
The orientation of the radiator will cause a problem.
If you orient it to take in cool air from the outside, you will cool the cpu better, but the hot air then circulates inside the case heating up the graphics card and motherboard.
If you orient it to exhaust(which I think is better) , then your cpu cooling will be less effective because it uses pre heated case air.
And... I have read too many tales of woe when a liquid cooler leaks.
google "H100 leak"

I would use a noctua cooler with a 140mm fan.

The build looks good.

I think 120gb is a bit small for the "C" drive ssd.
I would use 240gb

I would insist on a quality power supply.
Here is such a list:http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/thread/323050.aspx

Onboard HD 7.1 sound is very good. Do you really have the speakers and a good ear to require a discrete sound card?


I understand what you mean for the Liquid Cooling, since it's gonna be in a place where it will ventilate easily i would go for the Thermalake Frio OCK CPU Cooler with Dual pull-push fans.

Thanks for the power supply list it's great help.

Thanks a lot !
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a b à CPUs
January 20, 2014 6:35:29 PM

Quote:
A liquid cooler will be expensive, noisy, less reliable, and will not cool any better
in a well ventilated case.


Yes and no. Watercooling is about expanding radiator space. Typically you have a large heatsink with a dense fin count that draws heat away from the CPU then one or two fans pushing air across those fins to funnel that hot air out your cases exhaust. How fast you can exchange heat is a function of surface area and air volume, basically how many fins you have and how much air your pushing over it. What watercooling does is use water to pull heat away from your CPU and to a location that is more conducive to large surface area's and higher air volume. No HSF combo is going to compete with a 240mm Radiator with two to four 120mm fans for surface area and air volumes. And that's a small implementation. Going with a 360mm + 240mm rad combo allows for insane amounts of surface area and again much higher airflow. The good thing about such a high amount of surface area is that you can run your fans at low RPM which results in a much quieter PC. So watercooling is actually much quieter then aircooling when running the same thermal load, just WC folks like be a bit extreme and put a larger thermal load then possible with pure air. The down side is that it's expensive.

To the OP, watercooling isn't for the faint of heart, it's not something you throw on at the last minute. You need to design the system with it in mind before hand, things like case selection, tube diameter, blocks and fittings all come into play. For that reason I recommend new folks get a closed loop OEM cooler like the Corsair H100i. Make sure your case has a 240mm mount location, most mid or larger towers have it at the top or front so you'll have to ask.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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