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Gaming ITX htpc build log

Ok so I decided to go balls to the wall with this one. I've put this up a few other places on here but I think having a separate build log would be more appropriate.
anyways...
Since I've started building machines I've always gravitated towards the bigger, bulkier builds. But my preferences have shifted a little. Now I'm looking to build the best gaming pc I can that will fit into the media center under the tv.

Skipping all the stuff I didn't cover, this is where I am now.

I present to you, the Night Fury









Everything's up and running. Got windows installed and it plays games and folds fast and flawlessly.

But it's far from being complete. So far I haven't seen anyone build a system inside this case that was truly noteworthy. Especially in the realm of cable management which is one of this case's major downfalls.

So I'm gonna share a few details of what I'm doing to combat this problem in an otherwise very good, affordable case.
13 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about gaming itx htpc build log
  1. I have locked my attention to coolemaster elite 120 (or 130?) since a long time ago. Bitfenix Prodigy is so overated due to its Mac Pro look. Your build is similar and probably even better than to the one I had in my mind for this case. Great work, enjoy Night Fury...
  2. Big fan of any ITX build really. For such a "cheap" case, the Elite 130 looks the part. My main gripe with it is the PSU hanging out of the back, it doesn't make a lot of sense to me really as a design choice.
    When they were selling off HD7990s I was very close to getting hold of one for a build like this, but I decided that eating and heating were more important. Poor decision.

    tonyzet said:
    I have locked my attention to coolemaster elite 120 (or 130?) since a long time ago. Bitfenix Prodigy is so overated due to its Mac Pro look. Your build is similar and probably even better than to the one I had in my mind for this case. Great work, enjoy Night Fury...

    I think the three Bitfenix cases are great if you appreciate them for what they are, and compared to a build in did a while back in an Elite 120, they are pretty pleasant to build in, and to mod. They deserve a lot of their success, but you are totally right that they shouldn't be the "I'm building an ITX gaming system" case of choice, they have too many downsides.
  3. I know. The thing that bugs me the most about them is that there are essentially mATX size cases with terrible cable management. But their HHD cage configuration flexibility is great for modding. The thing is that most consumers that buy them don't usually care about those things
  4. Best answer
    Absolutely. I have three Prodigys lol. Well, to be more precise I have taken delivery of three Prodigy cases.
    The first was for me, I didn't really need the space, but I wanted something I could tinker with. It arrived broken.
    Case number two I got for free as a replacement. I use case one for various tinkering, and put my hardware in case two.
    Case three was for a friend who said "I like your computer it looks like a speaker" (direct quote) and so I knocked him up a build too.
    By now, I consider myself something of an expert, and I could reel off at least 10 things that they could improve in a next generation Prodigy, without hurting it's USPs.
    The biggest disappointment for me is the Prodigy M. There are a load of modded Prodigys which have mATX boards in them, and Bitfenix, rather than change the chassis, use the original Prodigy chassis in 5 subsequent designs to save money. It makes sense financially, but it means their three mATX cases are a clusterf*ck of poor choices and design limitations. When the Aerocool Dead Silence basically copies their design and scales it up slightly with a photocopier, and does a better job, you get a sense of how big a mis-step this was.
  5. My first course of action, after wiring everything up and tidying it the best I could, was to completely dismantle my pci-e cable rout and the cable its self and test out my cable sleeving skills.



    As you can see, it's a bit long and messy, so I gotta order some supplies to actually fabricate my own, shorter cable.
  6. To be honest Prodigy M never intrigued me as the original Prodigy did. I wouldn't call mATX my favourite form factor...

    PS: Lets stop messing up with his build log...
  7. Rammy said:
    Big fan of any ITX build really. For such a "cheap" case, the Elite 130 looks the part. My main gripe with it is the PSU hanging out of the back, it doesn't make a lot of sense to me really as a design choice.
    When they were selling off HD7990s I was very close to getting hold of one for a build like this, but I decided that eating and heating were more important. Poor decision.


    The PSU hanging out the back doeesn't really bother me that much. In fact, the way they put the assembly together makes it very easy for installation especially with a modular PSU. My gripe with the case is basically just the fit and finish. Granted, for $50 it's awesome, but it's only $50 awesome. The tolerances between the parts are low, it's held together with rivets instead of screws mostly, and it's very basic in design. No open access to the backplate of the Mobo, limited cable management options (which come with the form factor) and not much clearance between any cpu heatsink/waterblock and the PSU.

    But all that aside, it's been really fun thus far building in. What sets these kinds of builds apart from more traditional bigger builds, is the need to think outside of the box and be more creative with the solutions to your problems.
  8. Panzer AppleHusky said:
    Rammy said:
    Big fan of any ITX build really. For such a "cheap" case, the Elite 130 looks the part. My main gripe with it is the PSU hanging out of the back, it doesn't make a lot of sense to me really as a design choice.
    When they were selling off HD7990s I was very close to getting hold of one for a build like this, but I decided that eating and heating were more important. Poor decision.


    The PSU hanging out the back doeesn't really bother me that much. In fact, the way they put the assembly together makes it very easy for installation especially with a modular PSU. My gripe with the case is basically just the fit and finish. Granted, for $50 it's awesome, but it's only $50 awesome. The tolerances between the parts are low, it's held together with rivets instead of screws mostly, and it's very basic in design. No open access to the backplate of the Mobo, limited cable management options (which come with the form factor) and not much clearance between any cpu heatsink/waterblock and the PSU.

    But all that aside, it's been really fun thus far building in. What sets these kinds of builds apart from more traditional bigger builds, is the need to think outside of the box and be more creative with the solutions to your problems.


    For me the most challenging part is the length of the power cords. Unlike EVGA Hydron where the psu is desinged for the specific case, most miniITX cases struggle to host -even modular- high end power supplies...
  9. tonyzet said:
    Panzer AppleHusky said:
    Rammy said:
    Big fan of any ITX build really. For such a "cheap" case, the Elite 130 looks the part. My main gripe with it is the PSU hanging out of the back, it doesn't make a lot of sense to me really as a design choice.
    When they were selling off HD7990s I was very close to getting hold of one for a build like this, but I decided that eating and heating were more important. Poor decision.


    The PSU hanging out the back doeesn't really bother me that much. In fact, the way they put the assembly together makes it very easy for installation especially with a modular PSU. My gripe with the case is basically just the fit and finish. Granted, for $50 it's awesome, but it's only $50 awesome. The tolerances between the parts are low, it's held together with rivets instead of screws mostly, and it's very basic in design. No open access to the backplate of the Mobo, limited cable management options (which come with the form factor) and not much clearance between any cpu heatsink/waterblock and the PSU.

    But all that aside, it's been really fun thus far building in. What sets these kinds of builds apart from more traditional bigger builds, is the need to think outside of the box and be more creative with the solutions to your problems.


    For me the most challenging part is the length of the power cords. Unlike EVGA Hydron where the psu is desinged for the specific case, most miniITX cases struggle to host -even modular- high end power supplies...


    Agreed. There just isn't enough clearance to be able to do a proper job without some modifications to either the case or the power cables. Another BIG thing I'm having trouble with is the h80i waterblock's tubes barely fit under the PSU so I'm always having to push them down and out of the way when I put the PSU in. If they would've just made it a bit taller, that would've been great. But it does work the way it is so I can't complain too much.
  10. Just ordered all the supplies I need to fabricate my own cables. Wire stripper, crimper, terminals, terminals, more terminals, helping hands, molex pin remover and some heatshrink
    Very expensive tools. hope they are worth the money. Got the ones that lutro0 recommended so they should be.
  11. here's a video showing the various nooks and crannies of the pc so far.

    http://
  12. Just received the Lutro0 customs supplies in the mail. Will start sleeving as soon as I get time. Classes are killing me xD
  13. I've learned that the process of sleeving is very painstaking and tedious. But a cumulative 15 hours later, this is my result. Sleeved 24 pin, six and eight pin, and all routed nicely with velcro cable management ties instead of zip ties. For now, I'm happy. Might redo the 24 pin once my fingers heal to make it longer and a little more consistent so I can hide it along the perimeter of the case better.

    But until then, this is the finished product.






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