Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Ethernet Cable Troubles!

Tags:
  • Wireless Network
  • Cable
  • Ethernet Card
Last response: in Wireless Networking
Share
January 21, 2014 12:15:06 PM

Hi, I have been surfing through the forums for the past 2-3 weeks due to other issues which were easily solved. My newest problem is my cat6 ethernet cable does not want to properly work with my new desktop (HP Pavilion 500-118).

The ethernet cable works fine on my laptop (toshiba satellite c850) as does the wifi in some parts of my basement - that being said my wireless router / modem is upstairs. When I do plug in the ethernet cable into the port I get an orange light, no green or other colours, as well as a constant message that it's connected but then disappears, almost rapidly.

If somebody can help me that'd be awesome, sick of having to use the wifi signal which only gives 1-3 bars connection out of 5. :( 

More about : ethernet cable troubles

January 21, 2014 12:24:50 PM

How long is the cable from your router to your desktop PC? You said it works find on the toshiba notebook, does the notebook connect at full speed to the network?
m
0
l
January 21, 2014 12:38:18 PM

Are you running the cable past any home appliances? Electrical interference can easily cause enough signal degradation over a long Ethernet run to the point it will either work at a lower speed tier or not connect at all.

I second what the previous poster inquired, how long is your Ethernet cable, and what speed is the Toshiba connecting at?

Have you physically inspected the cable for damage, including both ends, and ensured the connectors are still both firmly attached?

Is the cable home-made?
m
0
l
Related resources
January 21, 2014 2:56:38 PM

ronintexas said:
How long is the cable from your router to your desktop PC? You said it works find on the toshiba notebook, does the notebook connect at full speed to the network?


The cable itself is 100 feet long, and yes, when it's connected to my laptop it runs perfectly fine.


bigpinkdragon286 said:
Are you running the cable past any home appliances? Electrical interference can easily cause enough signal degradation over a long Ethernet run to the point it will either work at a lower speed tier or not connect at all.

I second what the previous poster inquired, how long is your Ethernet cable, and what speed is the Toshiba connecting at?

Have you physically inspected the cable for damage, including both ends, and ensured the connectors are still both firmly attached?

Is the cable home-made?


I am running it from the modem down a flight of stairs but it shouldn't be interupting the connection. There is no damage to the cord itself, only one side of the cable is snapped off (the little plastic piece that connects it firmly to the port).
m
0
l
January 22, 2014 7:21:11 AM

Max distance for an ethernet cable is 300 feet so you aren't near max (33%). Damage to a 6 foot cable is less likely to be "death" as compared to a 100 foot cable - the longer the cable, the more serious damage tends to be.

The problem with the "little plastic piece" indicates that it might not be seating properly in your desktop for some reason, but yet it seats properly with the laptop - this could be due to the angle the cable is being plugged in, the tension of the connector on the device, etc....

Is it possible for you to replace the end on the cable or replace the cable?
m
0
l
January 22, 2014 11:12:07 AM

... or conversely, temporarily move one or the other device to be closer, and use a shorter cable and verify your connection between the two devices works at all? The problem may not be the cable.
m
0
l
January 22, 2014 11:19:24 AM

ronintexas said:
Max distance for an ethernet cable is 300 feet so you aren't near max (33%). Damage to a 6 foot cable is less likely to be "death" as compared to a 100 foot cable - the longer the cable, the more serious damage tends to be.

The problem with the "little plastic piece" indicates that it might not be seating properly in your desktop for some reason, but yet it seats properly with the laptop - this could be due to the angle the cable is being plugged in, the tension of the connector on the device, etc....

Is it possible for you to replace the end on the cable or replace the cable?

The broken part of the cable is plugged into the modem itself, and once it's plugged into the laptop everything is all good, no connection lost, etc. I haven't switched sides plugging the broken part into the desktop and the other side into the modem, doubt that would work.
bigpinkdragon286 said:
... or conversely, temporarily move one or the other device to be closer, and use a shorter cable and verify your connection between the two devices works at all? The problem may not be the cable.


Can't be done, hence why I have a 100 feat cable, I'm permitted to keep my desktop down here. Only thing I can think of is to by a new cable cord for $60 or buy a usb that helps with the wifi connection. I don't know if the problem is the cable or it is the desktop itself not recognizing the cable.
m
0
l
January 22, 2014 11:49:32 AM

It might be a royal pain in the ass to take the desktop upstairs to try it with another cable - but it will give you a definitive answer....
m
0
l
January 22, 2014 1:28:31 PM

I was leaning toward moving the router / modem, perhaps when nobody else is using the network. It's the easiest way to rule out the cable, short of using a cable analyzer.

On the off-chance the cable has had broken end-connectors repaired before, any chance the person may have mis-wired the connector? Most cable ends are transparent so you can verify the wiring is correct.

Here is what you're looking for:
m
0
l
January 22, 2014 1:44:35 PM

I don't find cross-over cables to be very common anymore. Most networking equipment auto-senses whether you're running a straight-through or cross-over and switches automatically, but in the off-chance your desktop has a picky adapter, you might verify which kind of cable you have. You might also take a stroll into the Device Manager for your desktop, expand the Network Adapters section, pull up the Properties for your network adapter, switch to the Advanced tab, and have a look for Speed & Duplex (not all drivers expose this setting.) Normally it's set for Auto Negotiation, but if it isn't, it's worth a shot. Also, if Auto isn't working, you can try the other settings, starting with the most conservative.

In the end, just because the standards for Ethernet are 100 m between active switches, that doesn't mean each piece of equipment is going to happily obey the standards. There's a lot of cheap equipment out there. Your HP desktop looks like it is running Realtek networking on-board, so perhaps the easiest solution, if it comes down to it, would be to purchase a better quality NIC add-in board for the computer.

Do you happen to know what standard of cable you're using? Cat-5, Cat-5e, or Cat-6? The first is not very suitable for gigabit Ethernet, and may cause signaling issues if the Realtek chipset does not handle it well.
m
0
l
January 22, 2014 1:48:16 PM

I have had another thought. You say you are plugging one end of your cable directly into the modem. What sort of modem are you using and where are you plugging it in? Is it a switched Ethernet port on the modem or is it taking the output you would normally pipe into a router? Where is the wireless network originating at, a separate device, or integrated into the modem?

I have dealt with some cable modems that require a complete power down and reboot to recognize new equipment being plugged into them, and properly assign an IP address. Have you by chance completely powered down your modem, removed any backup batteries, let it sit for a minute, plugged in the desktop, booted the desktop to Windows, and then powered the modem back up? Also worth a try.
m
0
l
January 23, 2014 4:33:05 PM

bigpinkdragon286 said:
I don't find cross-over cables to be very common anymore. Most networking equipment auto-senses whether you're running a straight-through or cross-over and switches automatically, but in the off-chance your desktop has a picky adapter, you might verify which kind of cable you have. You might also take a stroll into the Device Manager for your desktop, expand the Network Adapters section, pull up the Properties for your network adapter, switch to the Advanced tab, and have a look for Speed & Duplex (not all drivers expose this setting.) Normally it's set for Auto Negotiation, but if it isn't, it's worth a shot. Also, if Auto isn't working, you can try the other settings, starting with the most conservative.

In the end, just because the standards for Ethernet are 100 m between active switches, that doesn't mean each piece of equipment is going to happily obey the standards. There's a lot of cheap equipment out there. Your HP desktop looks like it is running Realtek networking on-board, so perhaps the easiest solution, if it comes down to it, would be to purchase a better quality NIC add-in board for the computer.

Do you happen to know what standard of cable you're using? Cat-5, Cat-5e, or Cat-6? The first is not very suitable for gigabit Ethernet, and may cause signaling issues if the Realtek chipset does not handle it well.

Never really looked deeper into the networks adapter section, I'm not that really "smart" with computers. :p  But, It is a cat-6 cable,
bigpinkdragon286 said:
I have had another thought. You say you are plugging one end of your cable directly into the modem. What sort of modem are you using and where are you plugging it in? Is it a switched Ethernet port on the modem or is it taking the output you would normally pipe into a router? Where is the wireless network originating at, a separate device, or integrated into the modem?

I have dealt with some cable modems that require a complete power down and reboot to recognize new equipment being plugged into them, and properly assign an IP address. Have you by chance completely powered down your modem, removed any backup batteries, let it sit for a minute, plugged in the desktop, booted the desktop to Windows, and then powered the modem back up? Also worth a try.


The modem itself is a D-link, and it's being plugged into Internet 1 Port. The wireless network is being fed from my router that's connected to the modem also. I have unplugged everything, modem and router included and rebooted my computer but it was all the same. This is what I get when I try and plug in the cable to my desktop;



It doesn't stay stationary when it says Indentifying, it disappears then comes back like 1 second later, a repeating process.
m
0
l
January 23, 2014 4:33:16 PM

bigpinkdragon286 said:
I don't find cross-over cables to be very common anymore. Most networking equipment auto-senses whether you're running a straight-through or cross-over and switches automatically, but in the off-chance your desktop has a picky adapter, you might verify which kind of cable you have. You might also take a stroll into the Device Manager for your desktop, expand the Network Adapters section, pull up the Properties for your network adapter, switch to the Advanced tab, and have a look for Speed & Duplex (not all drivers expose this setting.) Normally it's set for Auto Negotiation, but if it isn't, it's worth a shot. Also, if Auto isn't working, you can try the other settings, starting with the most conservative.

In the end, just because the standards for Ethernet are 100 m between active switches, that doesn't mean each piece of equipment is going to happily obey the standards. There's a lot of cheap equipment out there. Your HP desktop looks like it is running Realtek networking on-board, so perhaps the easiest solution, if it comes down to it, would be to purchase a better quality NIC add-in board for the computer.

Do you happen to know what standard of cable you're using? Cat-5, Cat-5e, or Cat-6? The first is not very suitable for gigabit Ethernet, and may cause signaling issues if the Realtek chipset does not handle it well.

Never really looked deeper into the networks adapter section, I'm not that really "smart" with computers. :p  But, It is a cat-6 cable,
bigpinkdragon286 said:
I have had another thought. You say you are plugging one end of your cable directly into the modem. What sort of modem are you using and where are you plugging it in? Is it a switched Ethernet port on the modem or is it taking the output you would normally pipe into a router? Where is the wireless network originating at, a separate device, or integrated into the modem?

I have dealt with some cable modems that require a complete power down and reboot to recognize new equipment being plugged into them, and properly assign an IP address. Have you by chance completely powered down your modem, removed any backup batteries, let it sit for a minute, plugged in the desktop, booted the desktop to Windows, and then powered the modem back up? Also worth a try.


The modem itself is a D-link, and it's being plugged into Internet 1 Port. The wireless network is being fed from my router that's connected to the modem also. I have unplugged everything, modem and router included and rebooted my computer but it was all the same. This is what I get when I try and plug in the cable to my desktop;

http://imgur.com/7a4CBG1

It doesn't stay stationary when it says Indentifying, it disappears then comes back like 1 second later, a repeating process.
m
0
l
January 23, 2014 4:47:57 PM

Have you tried connecting your long cable to your router instead of your modem? Also, if your modem has routing functions, usually the case when you have multiple ports, it's not advisable to have a second router running off of it, as both will be trying to run a DHCP server on the same network. If you need wireless functionality, you can set your wireless router to function as just a wireless access point.

It would be easier for us to visualize what your connection looks like if you could list the make and model of both your modem and your router. :-)
m
0
l
!