Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

What Should I use For Gaming?

Last response: in Storage
Share
January 22, 2014 2:28:31 PM

If i'm gaming what kind of storage should I stick with HDD or SDD ?

More about : gaming

a b 4 Gaming
a b G Storage
January 22, 2014 2:39:48 PM

An SDD will improve load times, makes joining games in BF4 much more pleasurable and getting into MMOs and the different zones really quickly. Once your in game though you will not see a performance difference between the two.

If you have never used an SSD you won't go back after using one. Take a look at the prices and what size you need the HDD will be much cheaper but the speed of an SSD for cruising around your computer and loading programs quickly is something that will spoil you.
m
0
l
a b 4 Gaming
January 22, 2014 2:41:51 PM

its doesnt really matter. With ssd all you will have is about a 5 second faster boot time for the games. Nothing major
m
0
l
Related resources
a b 4 Gaming
January 22, 2014 2:42:05 PM

Most people tend to have a little bit of both. They will put their operating system on an SSD and all of their other files (games, documents, etc.) on their HDD.

Some people also go with something called a hybrid drive which is basically a mechanical hard drive with a small amount of SSD storage inside to help move files around faster. A lot of people have had great success with these.

Here's a link to a hybrid drive: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
m
0
l

Best solution

a b G Storage
January 22, 2014 4:34:14 PM

DonnyTechMaster said:
Most people tend to have a little bit of both. They will put their operating system on an SSD and all of their other files (games, documents, etc.) on their HDD.

Some people also go with something called a hybrid drive which is basically a mechanical hard drive with a small amount of SSD storage inside to help move files around faster. A lot of people have had great success with these.

Here's a link to a hybrid drive: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...




The best HDDs are 7500 rpm, but they are very power hungry. since most people buy laptops to hard drives, most companies tend to make the cheaper 5400rpm hard drives that use less power, they just ad a small ssd component to it to make it perform almost as good as a 7500rpm drive, and call them "Hybrid Drives"

SSDs are microchip based storage, it results in faster read/write speeds, but they cost twice or more as much as a great HDD.

If you want good performance, and storage capacity for less, buy a 7500rpm HDD, if you dont care how much money you spend, buy a good SSD.
If you are setting up a NEW computer, you can choose to store your OS on the SSD as well as large programs/demanding games and keep everything else on the HDD.
(You cant really set up an existing PC to use SSD for OS and HDD for games/other without reinstalling drivers, and operating system)
Share
a b 4 Gaming
a c 878 G Storage
January 22, 2014 5:40:50 PM

Actually hard drives come in 15k, 10k, 7200, 5400-5900 rpm (some drives use a variable speed and have been clocked/estimated at 540x to 5700 rpm's) and several Nas class drives spin at 5900rpm's.
m
0
l
a b 4 Gaming
a b G Storage
January 22, 2014 5:44:39 PM

popatim said:
Actually hard drives come in 15k, 10k, 7200, 5400-5900 rpm (some drives use a variable speed and have been clocked/estimated at 540x to 5700 rpm's) and several Nas class drives spin at 5900rpm's.


anything over 7200 seems pointless. I would say if you can budget a small SSD for the operating system do so, like a 60GB drive. Then you can add a regular TB HDD at like 7200 for games and storage. Run the most important programs from the SSD like the OS itself, internet explorer, photoshop for example will benefit from an SSD.

m
0
l
January 22, 2014 6:01:06 PM

That's how I have my gaming system set up. I have SSD for OS and games, and a 2TB WD HDD for file storage (i.e. videos, pictures, etc). Great combo, I suggest the OP to do the same.
m
0
l
!