Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Will a 780 Ti be held back by anything else in my system... and ASUS PG278Q

Last response: in Components
Share
January 24, 2014 10:56:45 AM

As you can see from my signature, I'm currently running an ASUS P8P67 Deluxe, i7-2600k, 8 GB of memory, and an HD 6970 graphics card. I'm buying a PG278Q as soon as it comes out. That's the new 27" 2560x1440 ASUS monitor with G-Sync that runs at 120Hz.

I need to switch to an NVIDIA card to take advantage of G-Sync, so also plan to pick up a 780 Ti. Am I going to be getting the maximum potential from this card, or is my motherboard, CPU, or memory going to be holding me back to any significant degree?

Also, how do you think all those components will do powering the P8278Q? I'll be doing a variety of gaming.

On a related note, 3 years after I bought it, I'm finally sending my board back to ASUS for an RMA because it was one of the version 1.0 boards that were recalled because of the SATA port issue ("sandybridge recall"). Figured I might as well do it now before I upgrade my graphics card, and then I might also feel a bit more confident about sticking an SSD in there (so far, think I maxed out the unaffected ports with 3 HDD and an optical drive).

Thanks guys,
a b U Graphics card
January 24, 2014 11:03:50 AM

Nope
m
0
l
March 8, 2014 8:36:39 PM

moogleslam said:
As you can see from my signature, I'm currently running an ASUS P8P67 Deluxe, i7-2600k, 8 GB of memory, and an HD 6970 graphics card. I'm buying a PG278Q as soon as it comes out. That's the new 27" 2560x1440 ASUS monitor with G-Sync that runs at 120Hz.

I need to switch to an NVIDIA card to take advantage of G-Sync, so also plan to pick up a 780 Ti. Am I going to be getting the maximum potential from this card, or is my motherboard, CPU, or memory going to be holding me back to any significant degree?

Also, how do you think all those components will do powering the P8278Q? I'll be doing a variety of gaming.

On a related note, 3 years after I bought it, I'm finally sending my board back to ASUS for an RMA because it was one of the version 1.0 boards that were recalled because of the SATA port issue ("sandybridge recall"). Figured I might as well do it now before I upgrade my graphics card, and then I might also feel a bit more confident about sticking an SSD in there (so far, think I maxed out the unaffected ports with 3 HDD and an optical drive).

Thanks guys,

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Your motherboard has PCI 2.0 slots, and the bandwidth on one those 2.0 x16 slots is equivalent to the bandwidth of a PCI 3.0 slot at x8. Many (not all) of the Dual SLI implementations on PCI 3.0-capable motherboards is implemented on (2) x8 slots. Performance testing info that is readily available on the internet (from reputable shops) shows that there is very little overall gain when comparing (for instance) a pair of GTX Titans on PCI 3.0 x16 slots over PCI 3.0 x 8 slots (yes, I was surprised to see those results, but they're out there).

So, if you are able to achieve PCI 3.0 x8 performance, which you can on a PCI 2.0 x16 slot, your motherboard will not be a limiting factor. However, if you do plan on moving to SLI (which for some games you may need to on these higher resolution monitors if you want to support full throttle specs), your board will indeed be a limiting factor. Your board only has: "2 x PCIe 2.0 x16 (x16 or dual x8) ", so you'd be running SLI on PCI 2.0 x8 slots. It would be okay if your board had 2 PCI 3.0 x8 slots, but you're only getting half that bandwidth on the 2.0 slots that you have.

So, for a single GPU, you're OK. But if you needed to do SLI, your motherboard is a limiting factor...

Oh, and by the way, excellent choices. That G-Sync monitor should be awesome. I'm sure the G-Sync technology will only improve over time. Matching that with the 780 Ti? Sign me up!
m
0
l
!