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I'm building a new gaming rig - how does this look?

Okay so I'm planning on getting the following for my new gaming rig - is there anything which should be changed/improved and will it all work together okay?

I'm pretty much maxed out on the budget already, it's a little over £1100.

Case: Corsair Carbide Series 300R
Motherboard: Asus Crosshair V Formula-Z
CPU: AMD FX8350 Black Edition (Although after some reasearch would an i5-3570K be better?)
GPU: Palit Nvidia GeForce GTX 770 2GB GDDR5
RAM: Kingston Technology XMP Beast Series 16GB 2400MHz DDR3
PSU: OCZ OCZ-ZS750W-UK ZS Series 750W 80+ Bronze PSU with 135mm Fan & single +12V Rail

Samsung 840 EVO 500GB SSD
Cooler Master Seidon 240M Radiator All-in-One Liquid CPU Cooler Kit
11 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about building gaming rig
  1. Just a suggestion, but most people only go with 8GB of ram because 16 is a bit unnecessary, and will not add much/if any performance boost to most games.

    As for whether or not to go with intel, it just depends how much you are willing to pay. I tend to go with AMD just because the prices are better, but it's up to you.
  2. For gaming , not optimal

    You could choose any of a number of motherboards with a 990FX chipset and they will perform identicaly to the very expensive board you have chosen . Some might not OC quite as high but its unlikely a couple of hundred Mhz will matter to most people .

    No need for 16 gig of RAM in a gamer 2 x4 gig is more than any game can currently use and its likely to stay that way for some time since games are 32 bit programs .

    Consider the Radeon R9 290 as a graphics choice .

    You can size the psu using
    http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm
  3. Okay, 8gb RAM definitely sounds like a good idea then.

    I don't know a huge amount, and so could be completely wrong but the other things I was taking into consideration with was I read there is a supported speed for RAM on motherboards (in this case 2400ghz) and also the fact it supports crossfire/SLI means if I want to in the future I can get another GPU. Is this correct at all?
  4. sprucie said:
    Okay, 8gb RAM definitely sounds like a good idea then.

    I don't know a huge amount, and so could be completely wrong but the other things I was taking into consideration with was I read there is a supported speed for RAM on motherboards (in this case 2400ghz) and also the fact it supports crossfire/SLI means if I want to in the future I can get another GPU. Is this correct at all?


    Yes that is correct. However they have to be GPU's of the same brand. This means you could not run an AMD GPU and an Nvidia GPU in crossfire/sli together. You are also right about the ram speed, although I don't know if a motherboard that is 2400MHz speed is backwards compatible with other speeds. I think it is, but either way your speed matches the recommended speed so you are good.
  5. Never mind, it looks like your motherboard does not support 2400MHz ram. You can just use 1600 MHz ram and still have good performance though. Just make sure the cas latency is good on them (9 or less is good).
  6. Thanks again for your response. I'm aware they have to be the same brand, and so dual GTX 770s would probably be what I get eventually. Yes I picked the Motherboard/RAM together as they both had the same speed. I am trying to at least partially future-proof this PC but do you think the motherboard is too much?

    EDIT: Missed your post. On the ASUS site it says that it does support 2400MHz: http://www.asus.com/ROG_ROG/CROSSHAIR_V_FORMULAZ/
  7. sprucie said:
    Thanks again for your response. I'm aware they have to be the same brand, and so dual GTX 770s would probably be what I get eventually. Yes I picked the Motherboard/RAM together as they both had the same speed. I am trying to at least partially future-proof this PC but do you think the motherboard is too much?

    EDIT: Missed your post. On the ASUS site it says that it does support 2400MHz: http://www.asus.com/ROG_ROG/CROSSHAIR_V_FORMULAZ/


    That just depends how many cards/accessories you plan to add to it. If you plan to fill up a lot of the slots, then get this board. I only planned to fill up one PCIe slot, and therefore went with an ITX board as a result. Always think ahead as to what you will want in the future. As for whether or not it's too much, I say that as long as the price is right, get it. It's a pretty cool looking board if I do say so myself.
  8. Thanks again for your reply - after feedback from here and other sites I have come up with the following revision: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2H1Ga

    Let me know what you think!
  9. sprucie said:
    Thanks again for your reply - after feedback from here and other sites I have come up with the following revision: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2H1Ga

    Let me know what you think!


    These are all really good picks. One thing you might consider though: You don't really need an SSD of that size. You wont get any real performance boost in games with an SSD, it just helps to load files quicker. Most people just get a smaller 80 -120GB SSD, and put their operating system on that. This way your computer will boot windows much faster, as well as load resources quicker. You can put all of your games on your hard drive without noticing any real speed difference (except on SSD you have faster loading times).
  10. Hi thanks again for this feedback. I have reduced the size of the SSD to 256gb - I would like it this big so I can install games on it to reduce loading times, and this has allowed me to pick a better graphics card instead. http://uk.pcpartpicker.com/user/Sprucie/saved/3xiZ
  11. Best answer
    Looking good, I think your all set to start buying. If there are any problem during the building process (and there usually are :D) feel free to contact myself or anyone else on the forum, and we'd be happy to help.
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