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Building a new Pc with $2000

I am in the market for a new computer. My current computer is an alienware x51 with a gtx660 in it with nothing else really good ( yes i now know it was mistake to but this computer but whatever) I have all the peripherals i need and i have two monitors. I want this to be able to run BF4 and ultra in 1080p and have my second monitor run that mini map game zone thing. In the future think about getting another gtx780ti and running it in SLI but as of now i don't have the money for it. i live in the US



I am always open to suggestions and here is the build.

http://pcpartpicker.com/user/PapaSimmz/saved/3zbh

Thank you all in advance for the constructive criticism.
7 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about building 2000
  1. Change the 4770K to 4670K if your only gaming and use the money for a better case. Other than that everything look good.
  2. what makes that a better CPU and whats wrong with the case? ( dont take this offensively im just new to this and curious)
  3. 1. The 4770k isn't helping you game, so save $100 and get a 4670k unless you will be running any program that benefits from hyperthreading

    2. I can not recommend any "faux water cooling" device, the AIO / CLC units simply offer no benefit over the better air coolers at $75 such as the (in order of preference) Phanteks PH-TC14-PE, Thermalright Silver Arrow of Noctua DH-14).



    many peeps recommend the H100 and "then get different fans".... here's what happens



    Take listen of the H100 and decide if that's what you want to listen to before buying. many peeps say doesn't bother them as they play with headphones on so it's a "what works for you" thing.

    http://martinsliquidlab.org/2013/03/12/swiftech-h220-vs-corsair-h100i-noise-testing/

    3. The Hero is a pretty good motherboard but the same features and as good are better components and better performance are provided by the less expensive MSI Z87 GD-65 which has swept the board awards and performance crown wise in reviews. The Hero board is also plagued by a series of recent BIOS updates that seriously curtail overclocking stability but hopefully that will be resolved. If willing, take the $100 saved on the CPU and upgrade to the Maximus VI Formula which while an astounding board, is also currently plagued by the same BIOS issue.....hopefully will be resolved soon.

    4. I don't see the 8 GB of 1600 when RAM is so cheap and faster speed is almost same price.
    $79 for DDR3-2400
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820226373

    16GB for $155
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231671

    5. Good choice on SSD, HD I'd upgrade to Seagate's SSHD and yes, even with an SSD

    6. I would stay away from any SC series GFX card from EVGA..... historically, all the SC series have used stock PCBs and VRMs while all the competition's factory OC'd (Asis DCII, Gigabyte Windforce, MSI N series)cards have custom PCB and beefed up VRM. iour VRM will run at much higher temps than GPU and having a beefier one means lower temps and better OCing.

    7. Phantom is a bit small for twin GFX cards which you list in your upgrade plans..... Id want at least a 750D $130 after MIR and $10 off w/ promo code EMCPWHF49, ends 1/30) or Enthoo Primo ($230) both of which serve well for water cooling.

    8. 650 watt PSU will not support your planned GFX card upgrade.
    http://www.guru3d.com/articles_pages/geforce_gtx_780_ti_review,8.html

    Here is Guru3D's power supply recommendation:

    Quote:
    GeForce GTX 780 Ti - On your average system the card requires you to have a 550 Watt power supply unit.
    GeForce GTX 780 Ti 2-way SLI - On your average system the cards require you to have a 800 Watt power supply unit as minimum.


    My twin 780s draw 765 watts from the wall running Furmark and that is with GPU 100 watts shy of max load.

    850 would be the bare minimum

    $95 XFX Core 850 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817207011

    Corsair HX850 ($150) is only $12 more than your 650 watter and is one of the best 850s ever made. Seasonic X series is $170.
  4. If you are getting a second 780 in the future get at least 850W psu. I wouldn't run 2x780's on a 650W.

    i7 vs i5 debate. Gaming wise they're similar, that's why a lot are recommending the cheaper option.
  5. Best answer
    here is my suggestion
    i5 is for gaming
    if you want OC up to 4,4GHz, go for popular OC mobo like i put below. unless you want to break world record, then you need a very good mobo for it
    better ram 1600 CL8
    better SSD, faster, cheaper
    PSU 750W 80+ Gold from seasonic

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
    CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($94.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($119.99 @ Microcenter)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($84.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: OCZ Vertex 450 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($149.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($87.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($724.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: NZXT Phantom (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($89.99 @ Microcenter)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic G-750 750W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($99.99 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($16.98 @ OutletPC)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $1759.88
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-29 08:45 EST-0500)
  6. One is blue and one is red
    On has timings of 9-9-9-24 and one has 8-8-8-24

    The Mushkin DDR3-2400 RAM is 9% faster tho and cheaper than the CAS 8

    (CAS / Frequency (MHz)) × 1000 = X ns
    Mushkin = 11/2400 x 1000 = 4.58 ns
    Gskill = 8/1600 x 1000 = 5.00 ns
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