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Help A First Time Builder

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January 28, 2014 10:38:34 PM

Hey guys, this is my first try at a custom PC build, it will be primarily used for gaming at 1080p single monitor and watching movies (and college I guess). Any advice or tips will be much appreciated. Would really like advice specifically on my selection of: Motherboard, Memory, SSD, Hard Drive, Case, and Power Supply, as these are the area's I'm least confident in my decisions. I plan to use the SSD for my operating system and don't plan to put any games on it (I've heard this is the thing). Planning on OC my GPU and CPU (and possibly system and vRAM cause I heard this was also a thing) but don't know much about it at this time so advice on that is also welcome. Do I need a sound card or Wired network adapter? What 22-24 cheap/good quality monitor would you recommend for gaming? Pretty much tell me any and every darn thing you can think of I need all the advice I can get. Thanks for reading :) 

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2Jv5Q

More about : time builder

a b 4 Gaming
January 28, 2014 10:50:35 PM

Ok the price of that 64 gig ssd drive you can get a 120 like the Samsung evo for about the same price...
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a b 4 Gaming
a b C Monitor
January 28, 2014 10:52:53 PM

unless you're solely using that SSD as a cache or strictly as a boot drive, other programs situated in your HDD, i'd get 120GB or drop it altogether.

the Corsair CX PSUs are decent budget PSU's, but if you're getting another 770 to SLI or doing plenty of overclocking outside a modest CPU & GPU OC, i recommend getting one with better quality components. for your reference, consider a tier 2 as your minimum, 650W being plenty for a single GPU setup; http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/thread/323050.aspx

everything else looks fine by me.
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January 28, 2014 10:58:10 PM

johnnyb105 said:
Ok the price of that 64 gig ssd drive you can get a 120 like the Samsung evo for about the same price...


Dang thanks man good catch, any difference between the 120 EVO and 120 Series? (besides the 20 bucks)

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January 28, 2014 11:04:54 PM

Hazle said:
unless you're solely using that SSD as a cache or strictly as a boot drive, other programs situated in your HDD, i'd get 120GB or drop it altogether.

the Corsair CX PSUs are decent budget PSU's, but if you're getting another 770 to SLI or doing plenty of overclocking outside a modest CPU & GPU OC, i recommend getting one with better quality components. for your reference, consider a tier 2 as your minimum, 650W being plenty for a single GPU setup; http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/thread/323050.aspx

everything else looks fine by me.


I don't plan on using SLI or Crossfire pretty much ever, from what I've read it's not really worth it. I was getting the 750 because I don't really know how much power OC takes, I'm for sure open to a higher quality 650W PSU as long as it's reasonably priced. Can you give me a link to a specific unit that you think would fit my needs? Why exactly would you get a 120 or drop it all together? I'm pretty clueless about SSDs other than It's supposed to be faster.
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a b 4 Gaming
a b C Monitor
January 28, 2014 11:14:31 PM

people usually go for 120GB as it offers enough space for Windows + it's updates, some commonly used apps, and maybe a game or two. windows' updates will fill up a 64GB SSD over time, so unless you're diligent enough to look up & clear unneeded update files on a regular schedule, you may find not having a whole lot of space for anything but the OS.

as for the PSU, this is one of the more highly acclaimed ones;
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/seasonic-power-supply-s12i...

if you're looking for something more modular, there's this;
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/rosewill-power-supply-hive...
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January 28, 2014 11:25:17 PM

Hazle said:
people usually go for 120GB as it offers enough space for Windows + it's updates, some commonly used apps, and maybe a game or two. windows' updates will fill up a 64GB SSD over time, so unless you're diligent enough to look up & clear unneeded update files on a regular schedule, you may find not having a whole lot of space for anything but the OS.

as for the PSU, this is one of the more highly acclaimed ones;
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/seasonic-power-supply-s12i...

if you're looking for something more modular, there's this;
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/rosewill-power-supply-hive...


Ahh thank you for your explanation about the SSD, didn't even think of that. And thanks for those PSU's! They have so little ratings, did you decide they were good based solely on that website you first linked? What's the best way to determine the quality of a part?

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a b 4 Gaming
a b C Monitor
January 28, 2014 11:52:08 PM

Camtrip said:

They have so little ratings, did you decide they were good based solely on that website you first linked? What's the best way to determine the quality of a part?


ratings aren't always an ultra reliable way to tell if the product is good; people tend to remember and be more vocal of a negative experience than a good one. satisfied customers tend to just call it a day seldom giving feedback.

when it comes to PSU quality and reliability, reading reviews after reviews after reviews after reviews etc., are the only choice if checking it out yourself is a hassle. JonnyGuru being a favourite when it comes to PSU reviews.

otherwise, there's always looking out for a list like the one i linked. when that's still a chore, there's simply remembering these brands; Seasonic, Antec, and Corsair. the first is a well trusted brand in PSU quality, and while the latter two are still great, you get what you paid for. personally, depending on one's budget, getting something like Corsair's CX or GS series can vary from acceptable to "you can afford & deserve better". and you definitely can.
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January 29, 2014 12:07:44 AM

Hazle said:
Camtrip said:

They have so little ratings, did you decide they were good based solely on that website you first linked? What's the best way to determine the quality of a part?


ratings aren't always an ultra reliable way to tell if the product is good; people tend to remember and be more vocal of a negative experience than a good one. satisfied customers tend to just call it a day seldom giving feedback.

when it comes to PSU quality and reliability, reading reviews after reviews after reviews after reviews etc., are the only choice if checking it out yourself is a hassle. JonnyGuru being a favourite when it comes to PSU reviews.

otherwise, there's always looking out for a list like the one i linked. when that's still a chore, there's simply remembering these brands; Seasonic, Antec, and Corsair. the first is a well trusted brand in PSU quality, and while the latter two are still great, you get what you paid for. personally, depending on one's budget, getting something like Corsair's CX or GS series can vary from acceptable to "you can afford & deserve better". and you definitely can.


Thanks you've been so much help, I got just a couple more questions for you though. What is the best way to acquire all these parts cheaply and effectively? I haven't researched how to actually put anything together yet, do I need to buy tools or anything else? Will basic screwdrivers and pliers ect be sufficient? I'm going to bed after this post but will check back tomorrow morning.
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Best solution

a b 4 Gaming
a b C Monitor
January 29, 2014 12:32:54 AM

as for acquiring, not much else aside from checking out PCpartpicker for deals. you could try comparing prices at your local stores, maybe have a price match. if you got a Microcenter nearby, they sell the 4670K unfairly cheap. the catch is it's pick-up only.

as for building;

a phillips screwdriver would be all you need normally, preferably of varying sizes just to be safe. may as well get a flathead screwdriver just in case. borrow from a friend or family if you don't have one.

pliers aren't actually necessary, not unless you're pretty frail and/or don't like chipping a nail.

static is rarely a problem, but can be one if you're not careful. so no socks, no working on a carpet, wearing a sweater, etc. when building your PC. you could buy an anti-static wrist strap for cheap or constantly touch the metal part of your case to ground yourself when you're working on it. works for most of us.

try to avoid touching the metal solders on your motherboard, RAM & graphics card if you can help it. always hold them by the sides. ESPECIALLY for the CPU. the oils on your hands can be damaging to the components and no, cleaning them isn't a sure-fire way to avoid it. (view the video i link below for what i'm talking about). of course, sweat and any form of fluids will also be an issue

lastly, read, read, READ the manuals. take your time to study it. as a first timer, you're not going to finish the build within the hour, so may as well take your time on it. some common mistakes off the top of my head: motherboard standoffs are not installed, CPU/motherboard/GPU powers not properly plugged in, CPU cooler not properly secured, wrong RAM slots allocation, front panel connectors not connected or are in the wrong orientation.

or there's the more costly route; paying a shop to assemble it for you. shouldn't cost you anymore than $40-50 to have them do it.

a video on guide on how to build a PC. there's more where that came from;
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0zOYdNEHDQo
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