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I need advice for first computer build

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February 5, 2014 7:14:19 PM

This is a gaming PC. Mid-level gaming (I guess is what you could describe it as). I don't plan on overclocking (I dont know how to overclock. If someone could explain how it works and how to do it, then I would definitely give it a shot)

What i have bought:
Cool Master HAF 932 advance (shell)
Intel i7 4770k (processor)

What I plan to buy:
ASUS Sabertooth Z87 (motherboard)
EVGA GTx 760 (graphics card)
Microsoft home premium 7
Power Supply
RAM (8GB DDR3– 1866)
1TB harddrive
CD/DVD reader (to upload software and my OS right?)

So the questions are:
How many watts do I need for my power supply?

Which brand of RAM should I get? (if it matters)

Which brand of storage should I get? (if it matters)

Am I missing any components to get my PC up and running? (I just want to know about Internal components. External devices like keyboards and such, I don't need to know because I have all that)

Will all of this work together?

What do you think of this build?




More about : advice computer build

a c 109 à CPUs
February 5, 2014 7:19:38 PM

650W should be a good enough wattage to ensure you have some wiggle room to upgrade later.

branding of ram doesn't really matter much same with hard drives (although western digital blue is a very popular HDD)

you are missing a motherboard (unless you already have one and forgot to mention it)

it will all work together.

I think that you could have saved 100.00 and gone with an i5 if this pc is strictly for gaming. if you plan on doing a lot of video editing, rendering or other heavily threaded tasks like that then you made the right choice.

If not, and you can return your cpu and exchange it for an i5, do it, if not then you aren't losing any performance.
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a b à CPUs
February 5, 2014 7:21:03 PM

If you dont plan on overclocking get a non k version cpu itll save you money. K version are only meant for overclocking. Make sure the 8gb of ram youre getting is in 2 4g sticks for dual channel and I wouldnt go above 1600mhz especially if youre not overclocking. If youre only gaming with this PC droping down to a I5 4670 wouldnt result in any lower fps then using a 4770 its not worth the extra 100$ unless you do alot of photo or video editing or use apps that utilize hyper threading which pretty much every game does not. Only get Xfx seasonic corsair or antec for power supplys. You should need more then 550W especially if youre not overclocking. If youre getting a 1tb hard drive id suggest a Western digital caviar black
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a b à CPUs
February 5, 2014 7:23:10 PM

An SSD would be really nice too
http://pcpartpicker.com/mr/microcenter/samsung-internal...

Make sure to get a 64-bit Windows. The 32-bit version would see only 4GB. Actually, closer to 3GB after the video card takes some of the memory address space.

Storage - I am partial to WD's Caviar Black line, never had a problem with those.
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/western-digital-internal-h...

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February 5, 2014 7:23:17 PM

Sorry I did forget to post the motherboard. I am planning on the ASUS Sabertooth Z87
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February 5, 2014 7:26:36 PM

Thanks for the help guys. I really appreciate it
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a b à CPUs
February 5, 2014 7:29:04 PM

If your not overclocking getting a z87 motherboard and a K version cpu is a complete waste of money.
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a b à CPUs
February 5, 2014 7:34:55 PM

-you could run it off 550W, but 600-650W is recommended for the extra head room. 750W if you plan to get another GPU to SLI. tier 2 from this list would be the best bang for your buck; http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/thread/323050.aspx

-personally, doesn't really matter. i've seen brands i rarely heard of like apevia running just fine. the cheapest 2x4GB DDR3-1866/1600 you can pick from PCPartPicker.com will do, or anything that meets your fancy as long as you don't over pay for it (i.e; $120 for 2x4GB DDR3-1600).

-Western Digital or Hitachi based on a recent article on reliable HDDs. personally sporting a couple of Seagate that's running fine, but better safe then sorry for you.

-you're going to need a motherboard. a z87 is recommended if you wanna OC that 4770K. SLI support usually starts around the $120 mark. an Asrock Z87 Extreme3/4 would do you just fine. if you're not overclocking that CPU, may as well save a bit and get a 4770 + H87/B85 motherboard if you're not going to get another 760 to SLI, a Z87 otherwise.

-it will and it should.

-components aren't really "mid-level", but the performance can be improved. instead of getting a 4770K, you could save a bit getting an i5-4670K (or 4440/4430 if you're not overclocking), and spend a bit more for a 770, and likely see more gains in most games. RTS' and similar games like Civilization V do benefit from a better CPU though if you're more into that. other than those, the only other game in recent memory that do benefit from a better CPU is Crysis 3.
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February 5, 2014 7:44:52 PM

firo40 said:
If your not overclocking getting a z87 motherboard and a K version cpu is a complete waste of money.


Im not against overclocking, I just wasn't planning on it. mainly because I have never done it before and didnt want to mess anything up by doing it. But if it does improve performance by that much, I wouldn't mind giving it a shot
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a c 109 à CPUs
February 5, 2014 10:39:32 PM

for gaming overclocking only comes in handy when you can no longer maintain 60 FPS due to your cpu bottlenecking your graphics card. and current gen i5s are a LONG way from that. even second gen i5s can still drive the high end graphics cards with little to no overclock.
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February 5, 2014 11:56:16 PM

This is a great tool for estimating PSU wattage
http://www.thermaltake.outervision.com/
And please check that it has all the necessary cables that you're motherboard requires. Especially with the FireWire port your case has.

Never solely base a purchase off of brand but for RAM I usually use Kingston HyperX or Corsair (Preferably the dominator)

As for storage, I use WD and have never had an issue but lately I've been reading/hearing plenty of great things about Hitachi drives. Look into Hybrid drives or go the SSD route. Basically Hybrids give you a taste of SSD speed (Usually 100MBs read area) and most 120 GB SSD's can reach 500MBs read area. But that can always be added later, especially if there is a great deal.

Other components I would add (for proofing sake) would be a wireless card in case you are ever somewhere without access to the router. Your case has ports galore so I wouldn't worry too much about adding those types of cards.

All of this appears compatible. Just check that your PSU has all the necessary cables (Modular cabling is always a plus, gives you the option to remove unnecessary cables and/or add new ones.)

"Low" "Mid" "High" level all vary depending on opinions. I'd make a list of 5 games that you want to install (include upcoming releases, ALWAYS plan ahead) and check that computer meets/exceeds the reccomeneded settings, not minimum settings. Then gauge your computer.

Happy Building!
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a b à CPUs
February 6, 2014 1:17:24 AM

Memory: Crucial, Corsair or Gskill. Get some with the lowest CL (CAS Latency). 8 or 9.

If you want to overclock, just go to the OC forum here. Lots of stickies you can read there to get up to speed.
Just stick within limits with the voltages and you should be fine. Worst that can happen is a blackscreen or reboot. Then you know the overclock isn't stable.
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a b à CPUs
February 6, 2014 2:21:02 AM

A PSU isn't just about the wattage, it's also about the ampere. Most of the components, such as the CPU and GPU, use a 12V rail to draw power. Just because a PSU advertises 800W, it doesn't mean it will actually produce that. If you do the calculation of voltage x ampere = wattage, you'll get the true wattage that PSU can supply. The one suggested by avem provides 53A on a 12V rail, so that gives you 636W, which is very close to the stated 650W.

The second consideration is whether or not the PSU has a single or dual 12V rails. Having two rails means that the ampere is split two ways, which can create problems when your components suddenly ask for extra juice . Stick to a single rail to get maximum ampere and performance. The one suggested by avem is good, however, you'd struggle to Crossfire/SLI with it.

I always recommend going overkill on the PSU so that you have room to upgrade.
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a b à CPUs
February 6, 2014 10:05:05 AM

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I have to question the single rail thing. That power supply has 6 rails. Says its made for SLI/CF. I have an old (2006) Tagan PSU with 850W and it has 2 rails(816W max output on those), never had a problem. I don't run CF or SLI though.

850W was overkill in 2006 so I have to agree on that point. Means I can reuse the PSU in many future upgrades. And this is my 3rd upgrade.
The PSU only draws the wattage it requires so it's not like the electrical bill gets higher either.
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a b à CPUs
February 6, 2014 4:10:12 PM

If you are just gaming and you dont plan to overclock, get the I5 4570 with a H87 chipset equipped motherboard. There are no downsides for you unless if you plan to run SLI later on.

With that power supply, I wouldn't buy it. To me at least its an unknown brand, why are there 6 +12v rails, and its 900w with only just 80+, not even Bronze. If I was getting that such an high wattage output PSU, I would at least get 80+ Silver.
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a b à CPUs
February 6, 2014 9:31:38 PM

It's an old PSU, its not even sold anymore. Tagan goes under many names, Nanopoint is one.
The Piperock III is Silver certified according to their site so I would go for that.

http://www.tagan.com.tw/

One name in Asia, another name in the West. Quite a standard arrangement when it comes to computer parts.

This is a review of my old 2006 PSU
http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/psus/2008/09/26/silver...
It would have gotten a Bronze/Silver certification back then. I'm not sure that cert even existed.
I checked up a couple other benchmarks, different models of Tagan. Same story all over again. The PSU does not budge when you throw heavy loads on it. Rock solid. Why I bought a Tagan back then? Because it was the shit. It still is, in my book.

Something interesting to read about PSUs and the makers of em.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/psu-manufacturer-oe...

Corsair, Coolermaster don't make their own, neither does Tagan, the list is long.
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a b à CPUs
February 7, 2014 1:27:30 AM

Getting back on track, the original build you have is good. The CPU and GPU compliment each other very well and you have the ability to overclock as and when you want to.

I've already explained my stance on the PSU, so here's my two pence on the RAM and storage.

RAM is much of a muchness, some will offer faster speeds (such as 1333Mhz, 1600Mhz and 2100Mhz) but you'll only notice the difference in benchmarking. As Hazle said, just make sure that you don't pay over the odds.

I'd thoroughly recommend an SSD, even if it's just for the OS and your programs. You can use one for games, but you need to balance storage with price. Conventional HDDs offer far better price per GB and apart from faster load times, games won't benefit from being installed on an SSD.

In terms of brands, I'd recommend a Western Digital Blue or Black or Hitachi Deskstar for your HDD. As for an SSD, the Samsung 840 EVO series is good, but if your budget won't stretch that far, a Sandisk 128GB SATA3 will also do a fine job. I have one of these myself and whilst it doesn't compare to top-end SSDs, it blows the socks off an HDD.
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a b à CPUs
February 7, 2014 10:40:11 AM

I can also vouch for the Sandisk 128 Gb, have one myself.
But there is one problem with SSDs and that is if they get corrupt, it is done for.
Turn off write-caching in Windows for the SSD and hope you don't crash and make the SSD corrupt. Otherwise you will have to return it for a new one.
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a c 735 à CPUs
February 7, 2014 12:47:28 PM

If you don't intend to SLI, you can go with something like this.
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($334.98 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($34.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme3 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($109.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: Team Dark Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($74.98 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Hitachi Ultrastar 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($47.92 @ Amazon)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($319.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Microcenter)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1077.83
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-07 15:50 EST-0500)

For comparison's sake, your proposed motherboard and GPU.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($334.98 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.99 @ Microcenter)
Motherboard: Asus SABERTOOTH Z87 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($239.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: Team Dark Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($74.98 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Hitachi Ultrastar 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($47.92 @ Amazon)
Video Card: PNY GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($249.98 @ Best Buy)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Microcenter)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1131.83
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-07 15:52 EST-0500)
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