Solved

1.65V RAM vs 1.5V RAM, could it be causing my system lockups?

I recently built a PC with the following components:

Case: Rosewill Line M Micro ATX
CPU: Intel Core i3 4130 3.4GHz
Motherboard: ASRock B85M-Pro4 Micro ATX
HDD: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 7200RPM
Video Card: EVGA SuperClocked GeForce GTX 660 2GB
RAM: Silicon Power Xpower 8GB DDR3 1.65V
ODD: Samsung DVD Burner
Power Supply: Corsair CX430M 430W
OS: Windows 7 Professional 64-bit

For one, this was a great experience as a high school student to build my first PC for light gaming and for future college schoolwork. When all of the parts came in, I rushed to the UPS man to get all of the components to build this bad boy. I spend 5 hours dealing with putting this beast together, with swearing and cursing occasionally slipping from my mouth because of the road blocks I ran in to. Then, she finally lived. She worked perfectly fine, until I ran into one lockup, where the mouse would still be able to be moved, but nothing else would work.

I thought nothing of it. I just turned it off via power button, and rebooted. It booted Windows, and worked fine. Then it locked up again. So I did the same thing.

It really started to bother me because I did some research, and I narrowed it down to a memory, HDD, or motherboard problem. So I called one of my friends over to help me out with it, and we noticed one problem right off the bat, and it was my fault because I didn't read my motherboard manual all the way through about dual-channel memory. I had put the RAM in slots 1 and 2, instead of 2 and 4. So we did that, and rebooted the computer. It ran much faster, but it still would have the occasional lock up. The next troubleshooting method was to run a memtest. We did that, and approximately 3 hours later, no problems were found. Booted back to Windows, and I still ran into that problem.

So I did more research, and eliminated the motherboard and HDD from the problem list, and I'm now thinking (but I'm almost certain) that it is the RAM. So here in the next week, the same friend is going to let me borrow some of his RAM to actually see if the RAM is the cause of this problem. A red flag that came up was when I put my EXACT configuration into PCPartPicker to see if there were any compatibility issues. I got this message, which sparked a possible idea in my head:

"...operating voltage of 1.65V exceeds the Intel Haswell CPU recommended maximum of 1.5V+5% (1.575V). This memory module may run at a reduced clock rate to meet the 1.5V voltage recommendation, or may require running at a voltage greater than the Intel recommended maximum."

Could that be the possible root to my problem? If so, any advice to how to overcome this?
If not, what are some other possible causes for my problem to occur, and how could I fix this? Thanks!
8 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about 65v ram ram causing system lockups
  1. Milton_Moore27 said:
    I recently built a PC with the following components:

    Case: Rosewill Line M Micro ATX
    CPU: Intel Core i3 4130 3.4GHz
    Motherboard: ASRock B85M-Pro4 Micro ATX
    HDD: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 7200RPM
    Video Card: EVGA SuperClocked GeForce GTX 660 2GB
    RAM: Silicon Power Xpower 8GB DDR3 1.65V
    ODD: Samsung DVD Burner
    Power Supply: Corsair CX430M 430W
    OS: Windows 7 Professional 64-bit

    For one, this was a great experience as a high school student to build my first PC for light gaming and for future college schoolwork. When all of the parts came in, I rushed to the UPS man to get all of the components to build this bad boy. I spend 5 hours dealing with putting this beast together, with swearing and cursing occasionally slipping from my mouth because of the road blocks I ran in to. Then, she finally lived. She worked perfectly fine, until I ran into one lockup, where the mouse would still be able to be moved, but nothing else would work.

    I thought nothing of it. I just turned it off via power button, and rebooted. It booted Windows, and worked fine. Then it locked up again. So I did the same thing.

    It really started to bother me because I did some research, and I narrowed it down to a memory, HDD, or motherboard problem. So I called one of my friends over to help me out with it, and we noticed one problem right off the bat, and it was my fault because I didn't read my motherboard manual all the way through about dual-channel memory. I had put the RAM in slots 1 and 2, instead of 2 and 4. So we did that, and rebooted the computer. It ran much faster, but it still would have the occasional lock up. The next troubleshooting method was to run a memtest. We did that, and approximately 3 hours later, no problems were found. Booted back to Windows, and I still ran into that problem.

    So I did more research, and eliminated the motherboard and HDD from the problem list, and I'm now thinking (but I'm almost certain) that it is the RAM. So here in the next week, the same friend is going to let me borrow some of his RAM to actually see if the RAM is the cause of this problem. A red flag that came up was when I put my EXACT configuration into PCPartPicker to see if there were any compatibility issues. I got this message, which sparked a possible idea in my head:

    "...operating voltage of 1.65V exceeds the Intel Haswell CPU recommended maximum of 1.5V+5% (1.575V). This memory module may run at a reduced clock rate to meet the 1.5V voltage recommendation, or may require running at a voltage greater than the Intel recommended maximum."

    Could that be the possible root to my problem? If so, any advice to how to overcome this?
    If not, what are some other possible causes for my problem to occur, and how could I fix this? Thanks!


    I myself use 1.65v ram with a 4670k, so that's not the issue.

    First step is to go into bios and make sure all ram timings are correct, and that the ram IS actually set at the proper voltage.


    A lot of mobos auto fill incorrectly, I bet the ram could be @ 1.5v.

    Anyways, you should go into the bios and at least enable XMP profile for the ram see if that fixes your issues.
  2. No.....

    1.5 volts is for the JDEC profiles .... but most RAM speeds are advertised and labeled based upon their XMP profiles......XMP profiles for i5 and i7 RAM have historically mostly been 1.65. In fact, last time I looked, (about a year ago) over 2/3 of the RAM on Intel's XMP compatible list were over 1.50 volts. As production lines improve yields, manufacturer's have dropped the voltage necessary to maintain these overclocks....however I have seen MoBo manufacturer's recommend 1.9 and higher.

    XMP "allows compatible DDR3 memory to perform beyond standard specifications" and is "predefined and tested" by Intel

    http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/gaming/gaming-computers/intel-extreme-memory-profile-xmp.html

    Quote:
    Intel® Extreme Memory Profile (Intel® XMP) allows you to overclock compatible DDR3 memory to perform beyond standard specifications. It’s designed to enhance the gaming features built into Intel® technology–based PCs. If you like to overclock and squeeze as much performance from your PC as possible, then memory based on Intel XMP gives you that extra edge you need to dominate—without breaking a sweat.

    Predefined and tested Intel XMP profiles can be loaded via BIOS or a specific tuning application through a computer’s operating system. Often the easiest way to load Intel XMP profiles is using a tuning utility, which may be available depending on the particular board manufacturer. To learn whether a tuning utility is available on your system, you should contact the board manufacturer.


    Take a peek at Intel's compatibility lists

    http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/gaming/gaming-computers/core-i5-processor-memory-datasheet.html
    http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/gaming/gaming-computers/core-i7-memory-suppliers-datasheet.html
  3. My ASUS mobo hasn't a clue about the RAM voltage, I have to go in and set it to 1.5 myself or it gives it to much power and blows it, don't quote me but I'm sure ASRock is another brand of ASUS so the problem could easily be on that make of Mobo.
  4. Asrock was spun off by Asus so as to allow them to compete in the low end market without damaging their "enthusiast" rep. Then it was cut loose and Asrock now competes independently with Asus.

    Every Asus board I have ever owned / built (well over 100) certainly recognized both the JDEC profiles and XMP profile, tho I often chose to set them manually to what it said on the label.

    In the post Haswell era however, this is can be a fools errand as, at least with hi performance RAM on the XMP profiles, the rated voltage will oft be insufficient to maintain stable settings when overclocking...... I'm at 1.675 @ 4.6 Ghz though I'd certainly feel quite comfy at 1.8 ..... many recommend 2.0 even.

    http://www.overclockers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=734018
  5. Milton_Moore27 said:
    I recently built a PC with the following components:

    Case: Rosewill Line M Micro ATX
    CPU: Intel Core i3 4130 3.4GHz
    Motherboard: ASRock B85M-Pro4 Micro ATX
    HDD: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 7200RPM
    Video Card: EVGA SuperClocked GeForce GTX 660 2GB
    RAM: Silicon Power Xpower 8GB DDR3 1.65V
    ODD: Samsung DVD Burner
    Power Supply: Corsair CX430M 430W
    OS: Windows 7 Professional 64-bit

    For one, this was a great experience as a high school student to build my first PC for light gaming and for future college schoolwork. When all of the parts came in, I rushed to the UPS man to get all of the components to build this bad boy. I spend 5 hours dealing with putting this beast together, with swearing and cursing occasionally slipping from my mouth because of the road blocks I ran in to. Then, she finally lived. She worked perfectly fine, until I ran into one lockup, where the mouse would still be able to be moved, but nothing else would work.

    I thought nothing of it. I just turned it off via power button, and rebooted. It booted Windows, and worked fine. Then it locked up again. So I did the same thing.

    It really started to bother me because I did some research, and I narrowed it down to a memory, HDD, or motherboard problem. So I called one of my friends over to help me out with it, and we noticed one problem right off the bat, and it was my fault because I didn't read my motherboard manual all the way through about dual-channel memory. I had put the RAM in slots 1 and 2, instead of 2 and 4. So we did that, and rebooted the computer. It ran much faster, but it still would have the occasional lock up. The next troubleshooting method was to run a memtest. We did that, and approximately 3 hours later, no problems were found. Booted back to Windows, and I still ran into that problem.

    So I did more research, and eliminated the motherboard and HDD from the problem list, and I'm now thinking (but I'm almost certain) that it is the RAM. So here in the next week, the same friend is going to let me borrow some of his RAM to actually see if the RAM is the cause of this problem. A red flag that came up was when I put my EXACT configuration into PCPartPicker to see if there were any compatibility issues. I got this message, which sparked a possible idea in my head:

    "...operating voltage of 1.65V exceeds the Intel Haswell CPU recommended maximum of 1.5V+5% (1.575V). This memory module may run at a reduced clock rate to meet the 1.5V voltage recommendation, or may require running at a voltage greater than the Intel recommended maximum."

    Could that be the possible root to my problem? If so, any advice to how to overcome this?
    If not, what are some other possible causes for my problem to occur, and how could I fix this? Thanks!


    The memory module itself is probably fine, but running memory above the tested rating and/or outside of JEDEC standard timing and signal levels can introduce instability. Most of the time this can be fixed by boosting the voltage to the memory controller by 0.1 volts. Try that first.
  6. Best answer
    What actual set of DRAM do you have? Those sticks come in a variety of freqs and the problem may be that the freq is to high for your CPU...and please don't listen to the junk about running your your DRAM at 1.8 - 2.....most DRAM manufacturers suggest no more than + 0.10 over spec. I have yet to ever find any sticks on an Intel rig that need more than + 0.05 over spec voltage when properly paired with a CPU capable of running the spec speed. The DRAM itself doesn't need to be excessively overvolted, it's normally more the MC (memory controller) that needs the additional voltage
  7. Tradesman1 said:
    What actual set of DRAM do you have? Those sticks come in a variety of freqs and the problem may be that the freq is to high for your CPU...and please don't listen to the junk about running your your DRAM at 1.8 - 2.....most DRAM manufacturers suggest no more than + 0.10 over spec. I have yet to ever find any sticks on an Intel rig that need more than + 0.05 over spec voltage when properly paired with a CPU capable of running the spec speed. The DRAM itself doesn't need to be excessively overvolted, it's normally more the MC (memory controller) that needs the additional voltage


    https://www.silicon-power.com/news/news_detail.php?no=20130508001&css_1=1

    It's a 1600 model, and the BIOS recognizes everything that the specs say. Could one of the sticks be faulty?
  8. Yes, or even very weak, these are weak sticks to begin with. JEDEC Standard for 1600 DRAM is 1.5, 1.65 generally is indicative of old models, or (in this case) newer DRAM using weak ICs (memory chips), currently over 80% of all available DRAM in 1600 is 1.5, if it's needing 1.65 it's actually more suited to running slow 1333 or 1066, but some manufacturers still put these out, like yours, Corsair and Kingston, trying to get a price premium for 1600 sticks instead of the lower freq 1333 and 1066 sticks. Even the majority of the 'true' higher performance CL8 and CL7 sticks are 1.5. I'd look to try a decent set of 1.5 1600 sticks
Ask a new question

Read More

RAM Motherboards Hard Drives Memory