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CPU Heat problem

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  • Thermal Compound
  • CPUs
Last response: in CPUs
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February 8, 2014 12:36:58 PM

So, I had this computer assembled (by a different guy, hired him) for christmas. I got it, and I was pretty happy. I ran a few games, all ran perfectly fine, no frame drops, nothing.
I ran a few heating tests, however, and during running those games (Primarily PayDay 2) I was hitting 75 degrees C. to 80 degrees C.
Yesterday, I went up to the store, and had the guy reapply the heatsink with some Arctic Silverfox Thermal Paste. He wiped off the old thermal paste using a Q-tip with some rubbing alcohol on it, and then put some thermal paste on, a tiny amount in the middle, and finite amounts of it along the edges. He pressed the heatsink down, and spread the thermal paste, locked the heatsink back in, and sent me on my way.
I get home, run a few more tests, and it's the exact same problem, and I'm worried. I do not want this PC to break.
The processor is an AMD Athlon X4 750k. I have an MSI FM2-A85XA-G43 Motherboard, and an ATI-AMD Radeon R9 200 for graphics. The GPU is running perfectly fine, in fact, it's running cooler than all the other parts. I need advice, and need to know what to do on my CPU. I don't want it frying.
Thank you.

More about : cpu heat problem

February 8, 2014 12:42:23 PM

that is very hot for an AMD... on the other-hand, amd cpus don't actually have a thermometer onboard, and instead report their temps using some sort of algorithm... the result is they can report temps that are off by quite a bit from their actual temps...

check the socket temp on the motherboard with a program called HWMonitor. the socket temp for piledriver chips should be 5 to 10C hotter then the chip's actual temps. and report back what temps the socket is running at.
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February 8, 2014 1:52:30 PM

well... the socket temp should be the hottest one reported by the motherboard. In this case it's 46C. which would mean the cpu should really be running at 35C-40C... which is quite normal for a quad core piledriver under a bit of a load. Heck, it's pretty normal for a piledriver at idle in a warm room. so i wouldn't be worried about that temp.

Now if under load the socket temp is getting up to 75C, i would get concerned.
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February 8, 2014 2:09:25 PM

Another thing, I can touch my case near where the heatsink and CPU are, and it's warm. Not when I'm just browsing, but when I'm playing a game, watching a few videos at once, etc. Should I be alarmed?
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February 8, 2014 2:14:54 PM

DragonFlagon said:
Are we measuring from motherboard, or CPU? And the program that says it's at around 60 degrees idle is speccy.
Here's a pic: http://gyazo.com/c96d85a673f0097d96ee49b0ae6f1b79


yes. but i don't think you cpu is reporting it's temps right. generally AMD cpus are pretty unreliable at reporting their temps. and since your motherboard's socket temp is so much lower then the reported cpu temp i don't buy the cpu's reporting temps.

as i was saying.... with piledriver the motherboard socket temp is typically 5-10c hotter then the "cpu" temp. as a result you can use the motherboard temp to get a good idea if your cpu is reporting it's temps right. My piledriver for example, has a common temp reporting issue where if it's temps are lower then 30C it reports like -125C as it's temp. Once it's temp gets up over 30C the temp reporting gets much more accurate and in line with what you'd expect (it's usually around 5-7C lower then the socket temp)

other people have the opposite happen, where when the temp gets up over a certain point (30C-35C) the temps get really crazy in the other direction, reporting temps like 80C-100C or even hotter (there are some piledriver chips that will report temps in the 200C range).

Pretty standard stuff for AMD chips since the PhII unfortunately.
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February 8, 2014 2:18:47 PM

So I've been freaking out for nothing this entire time? Wow, I feel kind of stupid.
But, back to my previous question. I commonly touch the area above the heatsink and CPU, and it's warm. Is this normal? (This is when I'm playing games.)
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February 8, 2014 10:46:45 PM

DragonFlagon said:
So I've been freaking out for nothing this entire time? Wow, I feel kind of stupid.
But, back to my previous question. I commonly touch the area above the heatsink and CPU, and it's warm. Is this normal? (This is when I'm playing games.)


yeah... listen i'll give you two answers do with them as you please.

Technically if you feel warm air coming off a heatsink, the heatsink might be too small for your needs. In theory if your heatsink is large enough, you shouldn't feel particularly hot air coming off of it, as there is so much surface area it cools down pretty quickly.

That said, it also can be a sign of a heatsink doing a great job with a hot chip.. because if you have enough airflow and solid heat transfer, even a small sink can do a good job, it just will feel like a hairdrier. I had a thermalright ultra 120 heatsink... it probably was a little too small for the 125W cpu i was overclocking and as a result it blew some amazingly hot air... i mean seriously hot. Hot enough it got the mesh on the exhaust vent too hot to touch. That said, it was able to keep that phenomII cool enough (under 58C) even when the room was 40C in the summer here in phoenix. So it did it's job, even though it was amazingly hot.

If you don't like the hot air, get a bigger cpu cooler. if it doesn't seem to matter, and your system is running cool and quiet, then it's doing it's job just fine. and leave it be.

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February 9, 2014 5:50:27 AM

Thank you so much, I appreciate you helping me.
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February 9, 2014 5:59:33 PM

no problem!
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