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An experienced computer user first build (Gaming and CUDA Rendering)

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February 14, 2014 1:36:28 AM

Hello Everyone!

Link to the build in question at PC Part Picker : Here

Just as a heads up on the title. I work IT in the army, so I'm not afraid to get messy with this build, opening up a computer and installing parts doesn't scare me in the slightest. As well, I'm currently playing Battlefield 4 on a mac book pro that I hacked/force installed the latest AMD drivers for my 6750m. I do a lot of work in blender as well as a hobby, and the renderer in it is CUDA enabled, so I'm hoping for a boost over my 2.3 GHz Intel I7 Quad Core Hyperthreaded as far as render performance goes.

I've gone and built myself what I think is going to be my rig of choice on pcpartpicker. Mind you, I can not under any circumstance allow my pre-shipping price to go above $1000.

As far as why I chose what I did, I mainly wanted to focus on getting a decent nvidia card (due to needing CUDA) while still getting something that wasn't half bad for my CPU. I've always been a bid of an ASUS fanboi myself, so that's what pushed me toward my mobo and gfx choice. I have a few old PCs laying around that have decent optical drives in them, so that's why I didn't bother adding one of those. I grabbed the Western Digital from the $1200 lifhacker build.

My main problem is I know how computers work, and I know what I would want to buy if money were not an option, but I'm not entirely sure how the middle ground works out in the building world, and was hoping the community might be able to shed some light on my ability to pick out parts for a sub $1000 PC.

Your help is greatly appreciated, as long as I've made a good pick on the case and the memory, I had found a combo that saves me $20 bucks on the pair, so I'll spring on that right away. As far as the rest of the build, that will all come to fruition within the next few weeks.
February 14, 2014 1:59:18 AM


CPU: AMD FX-8320 3.5GHz 8-Core Processor ($153.83 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($99.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: ASRock 990FX Extreme3 ATX AM3+/AM3 Motherboard ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($249.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Rosewill Galaxy-01 ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX 650W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($64.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Asus BC-12B1ST/BLK/B/AS Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($59.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $933.74
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Best solution

February 14, 2014 10:38:33 AM

I think this is overall, a much better build then what you had originally thought up.
The 6300 is a great CPU (I have one).
The case and mobo might not have as many bells and whistles, but you can get a 770 out of this build.
Price before shipping and rebates is $990
If you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor ($109.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H60 54.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Asus M5A99FX PRO R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($129.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Kingston XMP Blu Red Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($87.27 @ TigerDirect)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($345.91 @ Newegg)
Case: Thermaltake Commander MS/I Snow Edition (White/Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 750W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($116.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $960.11
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-14 13:35 EST-0500)
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February 14, 2014 2:25:08 PM

zared619 said:
I think this is overall, a much better build then what you had originally thought up.
The 6300 is a great CPU (I have one).
The case and mobo might not have as many bells and whistles, but you can get a 770 out of this build.
Price before shipping and rebates is $990
If you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor ($109.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H60 54.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Asus M5A99FX PRO R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($129.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Kingston XMP Blu Red Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($87.27 @ TigerDirect)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($345.91 @ Newegg)
Case: Thermaltake Commander MS/I Snow Edition (White/Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 750W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($116.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $960.11
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-14 13:35 EST-0500)


I do have one question for you. I've heard some not-so-good things about 6 core CPUs. like programs not realizing they had 6 cores to work with because of the way the CPU is designed. Would you be able to shed any light on this?
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February 14, 2014 10:08:43 PM

You might want to do some research into the particular programs you had in mind, however, I have never had any issues with mine. I've also never heard of that problem in particular, however that most certainly mean that it hasn't happened. Like I said though, do some digging around for what you are particularly interested in.
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February 15, 2014 8:14:25 PM

One other question. Now that I'm doing the research on closed loop liquid coolers, I'm not so sure I want to put it on my computer. My main trouble here is that I REALLY do not want to wind up with a leaking cooler destroying the remaining $900 of computer that I saved my money for. While I really like the clean look these coolers give a mobo, I'd rather have the safety of an air cooler. Does anyone have any suggestions?
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February 16, 2014 9:27:39 AM

wydra91 said:
One other question. Now that I'm doing the research on closed loop liquid coolers, I'm not so sure I want to put it on my computer. My main trouble here is that I REALLY do not want to wind up with a leaking cooler destroying the remaining $900 of computer that I saved my money for. While I really like the clean look these coolers give a mobo, I'd rather have the safety of an air cooler. Does anyone have any suggestions?


So I really only consider there to be two types of cooling; Great and completely over-the-top making the inside of your computer as close to a freezer as possible.

So for the great category is the Cooler Master 212 EVO. It's what I have in my build and thousands of other people have it in theirs. It's a solid performer for the money.
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005O65JXI/?tag=pcpapi-20

Next is the Noctua NH-D14. It is a giant behemoth of a cooler and it will cool your CPU extraordinarily well, and even the rest of the case will get a little cooler from the massive amounts of airflow. It really depends on how much money you want to spend.
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B002VKVZ1A/?tag=pcpapi-20

Note: If you want to do some reading on both of these coolers, go to NewEgg. It has some more details than Amazon, but Amazon happens to be cheaper for both of them at the moment.
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