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Brand new i7 4770k overheating issues.

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  • Intel
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  • Intel i7
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February 14, 2014 3:32:29 PM

I recently got a new i7 4770k because I got it for a very good deal. (straight from Intel, not some shady CraigsList ad)
I bought a new motherboard, the ASUS Z87-A, and it is overheating when put under almost any stress.

Everything is stock, it's not overclocked or anything. I knew it would run hot, but it overheats to where it shuts down.

It runs idle at about 104°F, goes up to around 140°F in Team Fortress 2, and if play anything that demands more processing, such as CS:GO, it will continue to rise until it turns off.

I'll admit that I am rather new when it comes to working with computer hardware.
The fan/heatsink seems to be installed properly, as well. My friends that know more about computers than I do told me I should order a new cooler and if that doesn't solve the issue, return the motherboard.

Is this a common problem?
Is it just because the stock cooler isn't as good as it needs to be?
How would I go about fixing it or diagnosing the problem?

I don't know what to do really, other than try a new cooler. What would you recommend?

Computer specs:
CPU: Intel i7 4770k
Mobo: ASUS Z87-A
GPU: GTX 460

More about : brand 4770k overheating issues

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February 14, 2014 3:43:04 PM

Intel stock coolers are horse shit. They know they can't compete with custom cooler designers, so they don't even try.
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February 14, 2014 3:45:58 PM

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Use that if you want to air cool, and if you're ambitious

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Thats a water cooler, Thats what you'd need to take full advantage of that CPU
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February 14, 2014 3:46:32 PM

beartato said:
I recently got a new i7 4770k because I got it for a very good deal. (straight from Intel, not some shady CraigsList ad)
I bought a new motherboard, the ASUS Z87-A, and it is overheating when put under almost any stress.

Everything is stock, it's not overclocked or anything. I knew it would run hot, but it overheats to where it shuts down.

It runs idle at about 104°F, goes up to around 140°F in Team Fortress 2, and if play anything that demands more processing, such as CS:GO, it will continue to rise until it turns off.

I'll admit that I am rather new when it comes to working with computer hardware.
The fan/heatsink seems to be installed properly, as well. My friends that know more about computers than I do told me I should order a new cooler and if that doesn't solve the issue, return the motherboard.

Is this a common problem?
Is it just because the stock cooler isn't as good as it needs to be?
How would I go about fixing it or diagnosing the problem?

I don't know what to do really, other than try a new cooler. What would you recommend?

Computer specs:
CPU: Intel i7 4770k
Mobo: ASUS Z87-A
GPU: GTX 460


104 and 140 °F are only about 40 and 60 °C, respectively. Those are pretty normal temperatures; definitely not in any danger at that point. In fact if you're using Intel's first-party stock cooler that comes with the chip, that's quite good. You mentioned it continues getting hotter from there until the system shuts down—how much hotter does it get?

Intel's product specifications website says the the i7-4770K (along with most of their recent processors) is fine to about 72 °C, or 160 °F. It probably wouldn't actually shut down the system until it got quite a bit hotter, though.
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February 14, 2014 3:51:12 PM

oxiide said:


104 and 140 °F are only about 40 and 60 °C, respectively. Those are pretty normal temperatures; definitely not in any danger at that point. In fact if you're using Intel's first-party stock cooler that comes with the chip, that's quite good. You mentioned it continues getting hotter from there until the system shuts down—how much hotter does it get?

Intel's product specifications website says the the i7-4770K (along with most of their recent processors) is fine to about 72 °C, or 160 °F. It probably wouldn't actually shut down the system until it got quite a bit hotter, though.


Thats 140F in team fortress 2, he shouldn't see temps that high in that game, its not that demanding, and 60C is only 12 from Intels Danger point. You shouldn't be getting near that. It's Intel's stock cooler, which most definitely is not good. Not at all.
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February 14, 2014 3:51:13 PM

AIO water cooling does not cool the VRMs on the motherboard, which will get hot if you OC. 60C isnt too bad at all. Run HardwareMonitor and post the temps when you do something demanding.
I would stick with air cooling, if you want cheap and popular then the Coolermaster HYPER 212 EVO is a good pick or the Xigmatek Gaia. As for high end air cooling, the Noctua NH-U14S is one the best.
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February 14, 2014 3:54:58 PM

oxiide said:
beartato said:
I recently got a new i7 4770k because I got it for a very good deal. (straight from Intel, not some shady CraigsList ad)
I bought a new motherboard, the ASUS Z87-A, and it is overheating when put under almost any stress.

Everything is stock, it's not overclocked or anything. I knew it would run hot, but it overheats to where it shuts down.

It runs idle at about 104°F, goes up to around 140°F in Team Fortress 2, and if play anything that demands more processing, such as CS:GO, it will continue to rise until it turns off.

I'll admit that I am rather new when it comes to working with computer hardware.
The fan/heatsink seems to be installed properly, as well. My friends that know more about computers than I do told me I should order a new cooler and if that doesn't solve the issue, return the motherboard.

Is this a common problem?
Is it just because the stock cooler isn't as good as it needs to be?
How would I go about fixing it or diagnosing the problem?

I don't know what to do really, other than try a new cooler. What would you recommend?

Computer specs:
CPU: Intel i7 4770k
Mobo: ASUS Z87-A
GPU: GTX 460


104 and 140 °F are only about 40 and 60 °C, respectively. Those are pretty normal temperatures; definitely not in any danger at that point. In fact if you're using Intel's first-party stock cooler that comes with the chip, that's quite good. You mentioned it continues getting hotter from there until the system shuts down—how much hotter does it get?

Intel's product specifications website says the the i7-4770K (along with most of their recent processors) is fine to about 72 °C, or 160 °F. It probably wouldn't actually shut down the system until it got quite a bit hotter, though.


The intel CPUs don't even throttle back until 100C. Either the HS isnt seated properly, the fan header isn't plugged in, their is some massive OC or voltage raise were not being told or something else is actaully shutting your system down and not the CPU.
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February 14, 2014 4:39:00 PM

beartato said:
I recently got a new i7 4770k because I got it for a very good deal. (straight from Intel, not some shady CraigsList ad)
I bought a new motherboard, the ASUS Z87-A, and it is overheating when put under almost any stress.

Everything is stock, it's not overclocked or anything. I knew it would run hot, but it overheats to where it shuts down.

It runs idle at about 104°F, goes up to around 140°F in Team Fortress 2, and if play anything that demands more processing, such as CS:GO, it will continue to rise until it turns off.

I'll admit that I am rather new when it comes to working with computer hardware.
The fan/heatsink seems to be installed properly, as well. My friends that know more about computers than I do told me I should order a new cooler and if that doesn't solve the issue, return the motherboard.

Is this a common problem?
Is it just because the stock cooler isn't as good as it needs to be?
How would I go about fixing it or diagnosing the problem?

I don't know what to do really, other than try a new cooler. What would you recommend?

Computer specs:
CPU: Intel i7 4770k
Mobo: ASUS Z87-A
GPU: GTX 460




In most cases the system cooler should be adequate if your not overclocking or taxing your system. It sounds like the heat-sink is not making proper contact with the CPU. Check to make sure the 4 post holding the heat-sink Fan are properly pushed all the way down and locked to the motherboard. To be safe I would consider an aftermarket cooler like the one that Jake listed. I don't think you need to go water-cooling and if you are inexperienced I think you could find it a little confusing to set-up. How is the ventilation in your case do you have a good air flow from in the front and out the back? It doesn't hurt to have a fan pulling the cool air in the front of the case and a fan on the back and/or the top pushing the hot air out. Use at least 12cm/120mm fans they move a good amount of air and aren't as loud as an 8cm/80mm model. Be sure the grills are all clear of dust and any obstruction. Let us know how things work out.
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February 14, 2014 4:47:11 PM

Wow, thanks for the quick responses everyone.
The PC will shut down at about 220°F (~104°C) as I've seen in the BIOS.

I have gone ahead and ordered the Cooler Master CPU cooler, so hopefully that can fix things.

Jake Thorn said:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Thats a water cooler, Thats what you'd need to take full advantage of that CPU

I'm sticking with air cooling for now, Water cooling is more expensive and I won't meet the demands of this processor anyways. I don't play very demanding games, so I shouldn't be coming close to the overheating temp after this new air cooler comes in.

Immaculate said:

The intel CPUs don't even throttle back until 100C. Either the HS isnt seated properly, the fan header isn't plugged in, their is some massive OC or voltage raise were not being told or something else is actaully shutting your system down and not the CPU.

I do believe it is the CPU, because the BIOS menu tells me it is overheated into the danger zone upon restart, sorry should have mentioned something about that in the OP. It is plugged in, the fan is working, and as far as I can tell it is installed properly as well. I will try reseating it and see if that helps at all.

Thanks again for all the help, everyone. Let me know if there is anything else I should try in the mean time.
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February 14, 2014 4:59:14 PM

If your CPU is indeed overheating, those temperature readouts are far from accurate. I have a 4770k and it was hitting 90C before I modified it and changed my cooling setup. Also, hitting about 60C in Team Fortress sounds perfectly normal to me. Not sure what that guy was talking about.

Also, the 4770k is NOT supposed to cut off in the 70s. That's the tcase, which isn't actually checking the temperatures at the cores. Or are you somehow getting tcase temp readouts? That would explain why it would be cutting off, but I find that unlikely. Nonetheless, if it tells you it's overheating, I don't doubt it. Just seems odd.
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February 14, 2014 5:07:06 PM

Jake Thorn said:
oxiide said:


104 and 140 °F are only about 40 and 60 °C, respectively. Those are pretty normal temperatures; definitely not in any danger at that point. In fact if you're using Intel's first-party stock cooler that comes with the chip, that's quite good. You mentioned it continues getting hotter from there until the system shuts down—how much hotter does it get?

Intel's product specifications website says the the i7-4770K (along with most of their recent processors) is fine to about 72 °C, or 160 °F. It probably wouldn't actually shut down the system until it got quite a bit hotter, though.


Thats 140F in team fortress 2, he shouldn't see temps that high in that game, its not that demanding, and 60C is only 12 from Intels Danger point. You shouldn't be getting near that. It's Intel's stock cooler, which most definitely is not good. Not at all.


"Only 12 °C" is a difference equal to 54 °F. That's the difference between hypothermia and T-shirt weather. Let's not forget the magnitude of the Celsius scale. Even 70 °C is a safe temperature as long as it doesn't creep up much higher. I suspect the average laptop with a Haswell chip spends a lot of time at that or higher temperatures.

This guy is using an 84 W processor at stock settings, Intel's stock cooler is inefficient and loud but it is ample to meet the demands of an i7-4770K at factory specs. If the cooler is causing a problem here, its because there's something physically wrong with it, such as incorrect installation or a defect. You're out of your mind if you think an i7-4770K with the stock cooler should be shutting down like this under normal circumstances.

Yes, TF2 is an older Source engine game and isn't very demanding of modern hardware. Which means its video card workload is low. Without a GPU bottleneck, the determining factor in performance falls to the processor, and the CPU may be working quite hard if the OP has no framerate cap in place. And while the Source engine is old, Valve has kept it up-to-date quite well with new technologies—its reasonably well multi-threaded now so it is likely taxing all four cores.
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February 14, 2014 8:21:49 PM

oxiide said:


"Only 12 °C" is a difference equal to 54 °F. That's the difference between hypothermia and T-shirt weather. Let's not forget the magnitude of the Celsius scale. Even 70 °C is a safe temperature as long as it doesn't creep up much higher. I suspect the average laptop with a Haswell chip spends a lot of time at that or higher temperatures.

This guy is using an 84 W processor at stock settings, Intel's stock cooler is inefficient and loud but it is ample to meet the demands of an i7-4770K at factory specs. If the cooler is causing a problem here, its because there's something physically wrong with it, such as incorrect installation or a defect. You're out of your mind if you think an i7-4770K with the stock cooler should be shutting down like this under normal circumstances.

Yes, TF2 is an older Source engine game and isn't very demanding of modern hardware. Which means its video card workload is low. Without a GPU bottleneck, the determining factor in performance falls to the processor, and the CPU may be working quite hard if the OP has no framerate cap in place. And while the Source engine is old, Valve has kept it up-to-date quite well with new technologies—its reasonably well multi-threaded now so it is likely taxing all four cores.


1)His GPU will most certainly bottleneck him before his CPU, an i7-4770k is leaps and bounds ahead of most CPUs available now, in contrast a 460 wasn't even top of the line in its generation, and now we're approaching the 8xx generation of NVidia GPUs in a few months. You're out of your mind if you think that.
2)The Hypothermia to t-shirts analogy, and claim that 12c is a big gap, forgets that we're talking about a processor that should idle at 25C, and not throttle until ~80C, a 60 degree range for a game much more likely to be GPU dependent.

Quote:

If your CPU is indeed overheating, those temperature readouts are far from accurate. I have a 4770k and it was hitting 90C before I modified it and changed my cooling setup. Also, hitting about 60C in Team Fortress sounds perfectly normal to me. Not sure what that guy was talking about.

Also, the 4770k is NOT supposed to cut off in the 70s. That's the tcase, which isn't actually checking the temperatures at the cores. Or are you somehow getting tcase temp readouts? That would explain why it would be cutting off, but I find that unlikely. Nonetheless, if it tells you it's overheating, I don't doubt it. Just seems odd.


http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Core_i7/Intel-Core%20i7-4...
http://ark.intel.com/products/75123
http://www.overclockersclub.com/guides/overclock_intel_...
72.72C is Intel's stated maximum safe operating temperature. Any more risks damage to the CPU, especially 90C. You shouldn't be close to approaching it without overclocking,
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February 14, 2014 8:25:48 PM

Tcase =/= core temp. Do a little research on that.
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February 14, 2014 8:31:42 PM

jrgray93 said:
Tcase =/= core temp. Do a little research on that.


With just the stock CPU cooler, Tcase will be very close to core. I know what Tcase is. Or do you claim that Intel's stock thermal interface material is top off the line, and I should consider the core 30C warmer than the Tcase?
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February 14, 2014 8:57:58 PM

I've got a 4770k (4.3GHz) with an H100i and currently my temp is around 36-37 C on quiet mode. 40 C (104 F) idle is actually OK given you are using the stock cooling. If you want a cheap solution to the problem get the Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo. If you've got a little more money to spend I would highly suggest the H100i or even the H105 or H110. You don't want to run the 4770k hot (50C+ for extended periods of time because the thermal paste between the CPU die and the heatspreader will dry up very quickly and cause your i7 to run really hot.
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February 20, 2014 8:32:57 PM

Well, after I got a new cpu cooler it works fine, something must have been wrong with the one that came with it.
Thanks for all the help everyone :) 
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February 22, 2014 2:09:56 PM

beartato said:
Well, after I got a new cpu cooler it works fine, something must have been wrong with the one that came with it.
Thanks for all the help everyone :) 


Glad to help.

Yet another example of why Intel's stock coolers are shit.
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