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HELP guys ! Teach me how to Overclock my Memory RAM !

Last response: in Memory
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February 15, 2014 1:09:33 PM

hey guys , it would be so cool if you help me out to overclock my RAM , i search all over google i cant find my specific needs (details) to overclock MY RAM, i want to learn it Fast so im asking you guys here , so heres the DETAILS please help me out ! :

in CPU-Z it says i only had 530 mhz but
ive bought 2x4GB (8 GB) DDR3 1600 RAM ,
my motherboard support 1600mhz BUT my CPU manual
said my CPU only support 1333 mhz so 1333mhz is my target frequency
I Dont have xmp profile ,

MY QUESTIONS : (PLS ANSWER ALL)
1. example : if i have two 1600 mhz stick RAM would both memory run in 1600 mhz or
it will divided it two 2 and each has 800 mhz ??
2.i want to run it to 1333 mhz what should i do ?

PLEASE ANSWER ALL OF MY QUESTION
AND TEACH ME TO OVERCLOCK MY MEMORY ! THANKS !
a b K Overclocking
a b } Memory
February 15, 2014 1:14:45 PM

what is your motherboard and cpu and putting stuff in caps does not make people any more or less, and probably less.
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February 28, 2014 5:17:09 AM

I'm wondering about the same question too. Mine is Intel Core i5-3470 and ASRock B75M-DGS with 2x4GB of Geil Evo Leggera C9 1600MHz. Since I don't have a X79 or Z77 motherboard, does that mean that I cannot overclock the memory?

Since my CPU, motherboard, and memory are all rated at 1600MHz, is there a need to overclock my memory kits? Would I see a big performance improvement? I can't overclock the memory on B75 chipset? Then why are there expensive 1600MHz memory kits out there if no performance difference? Why don't people just buy the cheapest 1600MHz memory kit?
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a c 345 K Overclocking
a c 1962 } Memory
February 28, 2014 7:35:13 AM

Sedona, simply enable XMP and select profile 1, should self set up the sticks for you to the specs of the sticks, performance is often based on the CL (CAS Latency, lower is better) and the quality of the memory chips used, same CL sticks in the same freq generally won't vary alot
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February 28, 2014 8:09:18 AM

Tradesman1 said:
Sedona, simply enable XMP and select profile 1, should self set up the sticks for you to the specs of the sticks, performance is often based on the CL (CAS Latency, lower is better) and the quality of the memory chips used, same CL sticks in the same freq generally won't vary alot

So if Brand A sells a CL9 1600MHz "Value" memory kit, and Brand B sells a CL9 1600MHz "Gaming" memory kit, can I say that Brand B is better because it is optimized for gaming? Normally the "Gaming" kit sells a few dollars more than "Value" kit but they are still the same spec. But if CL9 1600MHz is good enough, then why did some brands called their memory kit "Gaming" when it cannot be overclocked to 2133MHz?
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a c 345 K Overclocking
a c 1962 } Memory
February 28, 2014 12:13:26 PM

Marketing mainly, you call it "Gaming' it sounds good, have seen numerous 'gaming' sticks that are really awful, 1600/10-11, that type of thing, low freq (1333-1600) that call for 1.65 right from the get go leaving little to know room for voltage advancement which is often needed for OCing...I've mostly seen this with Kingston and Corsair....generally for performance DRAM look for 1600/7 or 8, 1866/8-9 (at 1.5), then into (1.6-1.65 sticks) 2133/9, 2400/10, 2666/11 (and of course a lower CL is even better as is lower spec voltage)
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March 1, 2014 6:11:31 AM

Tradesman1 said:
Marketing mainly, you call it "Gaming' it sounds good, have seen numerous 'gaming' sticks that are really awful, 1600/10-11, that type of thing, low freq (1333-1600) that call for 1.65 right from the get go leaving little to know room for voltage advancement which is often needed for OCing...I've mostly seen this with Kingston and Corsair....generally for performance DRAM look for 1600/7 or 8, 1866/8-9 (at 1.5), then into (1.6-1.65 sticks) 2133/9, 2400/10, 2666/11 (and of course a lower CL is even better as is lower spec voltage)

My CPU is i5-3470 and the spec said 1333/1600MHz. The ASRock B75M-DGS motherboard also said 1333/1600MHz. Does this mean that there is no point to over-clock the memory kits to 1866MHz or 2133MHz since the CPU and motherboard can't support higher than 1600MHz?

If I get a X79 or Z77 motherboard, it can over-clock the memory kit to 1866MHz or 2133MHz. But the CPU is still stuck at 1333/1600MHz right? So how does it work? Doesn't the CPU memory controller and the memory kit's frequency must match? I checked the spec of i5-3470, it doesn't seem to support higher than 1600MHz.
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a c 345 K Overclocking
a c 1962 } Memory
March 1, 2014 7:42:56 AM

A strong 3470 can run 1866, 2133 would be doubtful (but not impossible). X79 is a completely different socket, and without a stronger CPU no real reason to change to a Z77
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March 1, 2014 7:51:24 AM

Tradesman1 said:
A strong 3470 can run 1866, 2133 would be doubtful (but not impossible). X79 is a completely different socket, and without a stronger CPU no real reason to change to a Z77

How to know beforehand whether the CPU memory controller can run 1866MHz, 2133MHz, or even 3000MHz? If get a 1600MHz memory kit, it probably can't be overclocked much. But if get a 3000MHz memory kit, the CPU might not be able to overclock to this speed.

On the Z77 motherboard, is there a reading where you can tell what is the CPU memory controller running speed after all the overclocking on CPU and memory kit? I understand there is no direct over-clocking of the memory controller.
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a c 345 K Overclocking
a c 1962 } Memory
March 1, 2014 8:25:27 AM

It not only depends on the CPU model, but the individual CPU you have as far as what it can handle i.e. all are different as far as what they are capable of with DRAM and with overall OC, Many seem to believe that if you get say a 4770K it should OC to 4.8 or whatever, so might find this interesting

http://www.hardocp.com/article/2013/06/01/intel_haswell...

DRAM is no different, most 4770Ks can handle 2800 sticks, though have seen a few that couldn't without drastic changes that most wouldn't embark on (voltage changes, advance timings, etc), or most 3570Ks can easily handle 2133 but not many can handle 2400 sticks in quantity
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March 1, 2014 9:02:44 AM

Tradesman1 said:
It not only depends on the CPU model, but the individual CPU you have as far as what it can handle i.e. all are different as far as what they are capable of with DRAM and with overall OC, Many seem to believe that if you get say a 4770K it should OC to 4.8 or whatever, so might find this interesting

http://www.hardocp.com/article/2013/06/01/intel_haswell...

DRAM is no different, most 4770Ks can handle 2800 sticks, though have seen a few that couldn't without drastic changes that most wouldn't embark on (voltage changes, advance timings, etc), or most 3570Ks can easily handle 2133 but not many can handle 2400 sticks in quantity

So since the CPU's overclocking capability is not rated, except for being K model with unlocked multiplier, the natural step is to get a memory kit that is rated at 3000MHz right? Even if the CPU can't reach this memory controller speed, at least the memory kit is factory binned to operate at 3000MHz with XMP profile. So there is no need to overclock the memory kit.

So start with getting a 3000MHz XMP memory kit. Then overclock the CPU to see how far it can go from default 1600MHz.
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a c 345 K Overclocking
a c 1962 } Memory
March 1, 2014 10:26:46 AM

I guess that's one approach, not one I'd normally take - I like to look at a clients needs, what they will be doing with the rig, etc. Then for DRAM factor in the CPU and mobo, and what will fall within the budget allocated and decide on sticks that realistically will (the general case) or might (for extremely high budgets) work. The buyer needs to understand that with the approach you suggest, that the sticks might not work at full spec and may need to be stepped down freq wise and timings, voltages, et al adjusted....i.e. when I first got my Z77 Ex4 and popped 32GB of 2133 in it, it wouldn't work, the BIOS had a tRFC limit of 255 and the sticks wanted 278, finally got them to work after multiple changes in the advanced timings (and hours of fiddling), got with the Rock and they worked a BIOS fix and unlocked the tRFC, then when I tried the current Tridents I'm running (they want a 313 tRFC) all went smoothly
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March 1, 2014 11:51:20 AM

Thanks!
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!