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Non-Delidded i7 4770k + Coollaboratory Liquid PRO safe?

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February 16, 2014 3:08:22 AM

I just purchased some Coollaboratory Liquid PRO and have searched for several days trying to find anything regarding using Coollaboratory Liquid PRO with the i7 4770k, but all I have been able to find are topics and information about people using it with a delidded i7 4770k.
I am very much the enthusiast, though I do not wish to delid my i7 4770k at this time. I would, however, still like to use the Coollaboratory Liquid PRO; But, as I have read about it being a major no-go to use this compound on certain types of metals (particularly aluminum), I need to be sure that it is indeed safe to use with the i7 4770k as if I were using any other thermal compound, before I apply it. Otherwise, I'll just use the Prolimatech PK-3 that I have.
I do realize that it takes so very little for the Coollaboratory Liquid PRO, and that applying more than necessary presents high risk due to much more intense conductivity; so no need in explaining that.

Currently, my CPU cooler is the Phanteks PH-TC14PE_RD 78.1 CFM, though I will be upgrading to a custom water cooling system in July.

Thanks in advance for your answers.


UPDATE: I believe I just found my answer; It appears that it would be safe on the i7 4770k, but it also depends on the CPU heatsink - or whatever is touching the CPU (for heat dissipation). In my case, because my CPU heatsink contains aluminum, it would not be safe to use it until I do upgrade to water cooling - where I will be using a compatible CPU waterblock.
a b à CPUs
February 16, 2014 10:15:52 AM

I don't recommend any coolant other than distilled water with a silver kill coil in the reservoir for performance. I recommend colored tubing and LED strips for color.
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February 16, 2014 12:38:33 PM

Nuclear101 said:
I don't recommend any coolant other than distilled water with a silver kill coil in the reservoir for performance. I recommend colored tubing and LED strips for color.


Not to intentionally contradict or embarrass you anything, but you seem to be a little bit confused as to what the topic is about. :) 
Coollaboratory Liquid PRO is thermal compound/paste, not a coolant. The question didn't pertain to coolants or liquid cooling; the question was about the thermal paste Coollaboratory Liquid PRO being safe to use on the i7 4770k.
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a b à CPUs
February 16, 2014 2:42:45 PM

I am extremely sorry for not reading it properly. :(  Failure on my part. I Coollaboratory Liquid PRO will be safe to use on your i7-4770k. If you can afford it, Gelid GC-Extreme is better performance. For the full chart of the roundup, check this link out: http://i.imgur.com/tLAWRqZ.png
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February 17, 2014 3:30:22 PM

Nuclear101 said:
I am extremely sorry for not reading it properly. :(  Failure on my part. I Coollaboratory Liquid PRO will be safe to use on your i7-4770k. If you can afford it, Gelid GC-Extreme is better performance. For the full chart of the roundup, check this link out: http://i.imgur.com/tLAWRqZ.png

Hey, no worries! Thank you for your response! :) 

However, I was unable to find Coollaboratory Liquid Pro on that chart, but I've seen elsewhere that Coollaboratory Liquid Pro is the best performing thermal paste available on the market - even better than the Gelid GC Extreme.
Though the only instance I've ever seen it being used on the i7 4770k is when delidding (no plan to delid for me); Glad to know that it's safe to use like normal though!
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a c 215 à CPUs
February 17, 2014 4:03:01 PM

Be aware though that the Coollaboratory liquid metal TIM voids the warranty of everything it touches. It is gallium based and will react catastrophically with pretty much any uncoated metal. Be careful with it as it is a heavy metal that does react destructively with aluminum, the video shows it well(the audio is annoying though :/ )
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FaMWxLCGY0U

It seems like it would be fine when just contacting copper though so if you get a copper water block you should be okay, but i just don't see the advantages of getting a few C less by using exotic/semi dangerous thermal paste unless you are trying to get the maximum possible OC out of your chip without exotic cooling methods. If you are just going for a mild over clock running 3C cooler gets you no performance gains.
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February 17, 2014 6:04:42 PM

hunter315 said:
Be aware though that the Coollaboratory liquid metal TIM voids the warranty of everything it touches. It is gallium based and will react catastrophically with pretty much any uncoated metal. Be careful with it as it is a heavy metal that does react destructively with aluminum, the video shows it well(the audio is annoying though :/ )
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FaMWxLCGY0U

It seems like it would be fine when just contacting copper though so if you get a copper water block you should be okay, but i just don't see the advantages of getting a few C less by using exotic/semi dangerous thermal paste unless you are trying to get the maximum possible OC out of your chip without exotic cooling methods. If you are just going for a mild over clock running 3C cooler gets you no performance gains.


Hey, thanks for your very informative response. My current heatsink (Phanteks PH-TC14PE) is only partially aluminum, being the heat fins and the top cover - but the part that actually touches the CPU, as well as the heat-pipes, is actually made of nickel plated copper. See here. So with that said... Using a gallium based compound shouldn't be a problem, should it?

As a disclaimer, I am fully aware that I must be very careful not to unintentionally or negligently allow this gallium based compound to make any contact with any other parts, and that no one is held responsible for any potential damage dealt as a result of my decision to use Coollaboratory Liquid Pro.

Thanks for all of your responses. Everyone else who plans to contribute more information, I also thank in advance!
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