Overkill with i7 4770k ?

Ok so I ordered couple days ago and I should expect at Wednesday my i7 4770k to arrive. People are saying that i5 4560k is better in gaming, how that ? I mean budget was a problem and I moved out from fx8350 but only because of personal bad experiance with mobos and overclocking.

Will i7 4770k in time with new games coming up get disadvantage comparing to fx8350 because of "8" cores or even i5 ? Or that is just a "story" because people dont want to throw money out.

I want max gaming performances but at the same time i want to render and keep learning about animations and so on so that is why I didnt get i5, and for some reason fx8350 had really poor performances in games like Rust/DayZ and pretty much all openworld games.

If you dont look at budget, is i7 4770k really best which I can get and be safe for gaming ? Not talking about GPU ofcourse, I currently own gtx770 but when 1080p gaming without AA higher then 2x became a problem I will look into SLI or even titan option.

Just need confirmation that i7 4770k is not throwing money away by itself, not comparing to other i5/fx cpus.
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  1. 1) The FX 8350 does NOT have 8 cores when it comes to gaming. Gaming is almost entirely reliant on floating-point calculations. The 4 modules that the FX 8350 have contain two "calculating cores," yes, but have to share a single FPU.

    2) The reason people say to get the i5 is because no, it's not really the best you can get for gaming. It's pretty much the exact same as an i5. The only differences between the chips is that the i7 has 8MB of L3 cashe compared to the i5's 6MB (negligible difference), and hyperthreading. Hyperthreading only gives about 30% extra performance, and it only applies to double-precision calculations, NOT the floating point calculations that any halfway-decently-coded game will be using. That means that it performs pretty much exactly the same as the i5 - in fact, a lot of people get lower framerates but smoother gameplay with hyperthreading turned off.

    Oh, and 3) ...a titan is a really dumb option, do not blow your money on it. The GTX 780ti performs BETTER than a titan at gaming, and the only things it's lacking are 3 more GB of VRAM and the compute performance.
  2. Yes I agree about GPU i just throwed names there but thats gonna be another story. I just upgraded 7950 to 770 for 50$ plus free game. I had couple hours to test new gpu with fx8350 and it performed really better, not sure why but I'm really satisfied even though people say that is not worth.

    Anyways i7 is currently something best which I can get if I'm a gamer and still working with rendering and other stuff right ? I'm not making mistake which I will regret hopefully. That was my concern. I'm gaming with Vsync ON anyways on 60hz monitor at 1080p resolution so I'm expecting only stable 60fps. If I for some reason stop recording/streaming new games on youtube as my job I will probably play only competitive games and they are working good enough even on fx8350. But still i want to keep learning and do some hard rendering/photoshoping and other heavy softwares during day.

    As usually "Futureproof" is relative, but I'm guessing that with i7 i will be little bit more safer.


    I mentioned already, but yes. I'm not going higher then 1080p, 60hz vsync on, AA 2x and other settings maxed out beside ssao and other extra options. I dont care about superior graphics, i just want smooth gameplay and that is why I want good cpu without thinking on upgrade every 3 months while I can spend money on better gpu for more intensive games.

    If i5 is performing same as i7 at the moment, I guess i7 at some point will get some slight advantage in next couple years. My FX8350 was already causing me issues in open world games.
  3. The i7 4770k is not an ovekill even just for gaming.
    And it is Better then the fx 8350 and normaly the any i5.
    also a better gpu like gtx 690,gtx 780 ti helps in performance
    How to choose a CPU for a build
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  4. Okay, I just wanted to make sure you knew the Titan was a bad option.

    It depends on how much you're going to render. Quite honestly, I consider it to not be worth the $100 over an i5 unless you're doing the rendering for work or for school - i.e. times when you're on a deadline and a quick render means money... but then, I'm perfectly happy to wait a little bit longer for them, so that's up to you. As for everything else, you're perfectly fine with what you've got.

    No, the i7 will not be more future proof for gaming. Period. Hyperthreading only applies to double-precision workloads, and games do not need and never should need that kind of precision. If a game is making enough of those calculations for hyperthreading to make a difference, I would consider its back end to be poorly coded.

    That being said, you shouldn't have to upgrade either an i5 OR an i7 any time soon - if you overclock it a little bit, it will last you for a very long time to come.
  5. darkolozankoski said:
    The i7 4770k is not an ovekill even just for gaming.
    And it is Better then the fx 8350 and normaly the any i5.
    also a better gpu like gtx 690,gtx 780 ti helps in performance


    I... what even is that post? That's nonsensical. (EDIT: He had a link to this page.)

    No, an i7 is NOT normally better than any i5 by any means - they perform almost exactly the same for gaming.

    And yes. A better GPU does help in performance, but the OP has a 770, and the issues are coming from a CPU bottleneck in this case, not general performance complaints.
  6. Thanks for explaining everything. At least I'm going to have "i7" on paper and I will feel good about that even though performances are same ingame. Not going to worry pretty much about anything in terms of CPU in upcoming couple years and thats what I wanted to hear.
  7. Yep, you're going to be set for a long time. :)

    You should update your hardware sig, though. ;)
  8. DarkSable said:
    darkolozankoski said:
    The i7 4770k is not an ovekill even just for gaming.
    And it is Better then the fx 8350 and normaly the any i5.
    also a better gpu like gtx 690,gtx 780 ti helps in performance


    I... what even is that post? That's nonsensical. (EDIT: He had a link to this page.)

    No, an i7 is NOT normally better than any i5 by any means - they perform almost exactly the same for gaming.

    And yes. A better GPU does help in performance, but the OP has a 770, and the issues are coming from a CPU bottleneck in this case, not general performance complaints.


    What about a socket 2011 i7?
  9. Geek Jed said:
    What about a socket 2011 i7?


    Isn't what we're talking about in this thread.

    it'll also perform worse for GAMING than a modern i5, except in the very very very few games that can take advantage of six cores.

    Its only advantage is that it has a whole lot of PCIe bandwidth, and with PCIe 3.0, even that is mitigated quite a bit.
  10. No I thought we were talking about the 4770k. And I believe me, you are WRONG about how the core i7, socket 2011 does for gaming. You see I have the 4930k and its a beast. Its out of 10 about 1.2 to 1.5 better then any i5.
  11. Geek Jed said:
    No I thought we were talking about the 4770k. And I believe me, you are WRONG about how the core i7, socket 2011 does for gaming. You see I have the 4930k and its a beast. Its out of 10 about 1.2 to 1.5 better then any i5.


    ...and your mistake right here is thinking that the i5 isn't a beast just because it's cheaper. You're wrong.

    Clock for clock, Haswell is faster than Ivy Bridge E. Add on top of that the fact that the Xeons and extreme i7s have such awful thermals that they don't even come with a cooler, meaning you can get way better overclocks with an i5, and things start to become awfully clear.

    Yes, an LGA 2011 chip will be very strong at gaming (despite not having PCIe 3.0 and being ridiculously expensive)... but no, it's not better than an i5. Sorry. There's no reason to try to tell people to waste their money - they're way better off keeping it, or spending it on a better graphics solution.
  12. Ok, let me just clarify, I do not think the 2011 sockets are better because they cost more, I simply think they're better because I use them. And i5s and i3s. Not yet have I used the 4770k but from what I read on it, I don't know if I'll get it. But you guys are right though, its a fucking CPU that costed me a paycheck and I should've saved it for a graphics solution, but my way is that you have to have a CPU that'll support your graphics card and have plenty of fast memory.

    But whatever you guys think.
  13. Geek Jed said:
    Ok, let me just clarify, I do not think the 2011 sockets are better because they cost more, I simply think they're better because I use them. And i5s and i3s. Not yet have I used the 4770k but from what I read on it, I don't know if I'll get it. But you guys are right though, its a fucking CPU that costed me a paycheck and I should've saved it for a graphics solution, but my way is that you have to have a CPU that'll support your graphics card and have plenty of fast memory.

    But whatever you guys think.



    No need to get pissy, dude.

    I completely understand the confirmation bias. I have that issue too - no more so than when the 600 series was the current gen of graphics cards and I would go off on people for recommending the 680 when the 680 was only 5% better than the 670, for 25% more money.

    That being said, the facts are stacked against you, bud... an i5 (while being way better than the effectively dual-core i3) is actually going to outperform a xeon or extreme i7 until games start to have 4-, 6-, and 8- core threading as default... and considering we're barely at dual-threading as a standard, that's going to be a while. :/
  14. Im not pissy man, I'm just saying you guys are right. I should have taken that money and fixed up my i5 4670 system.
  15. Geek Jed said:
    Im not pissy man, I'm just saying you guys are right. I should have taken that money and fixed up my i5 4670 system.


    It's a lot of personal preference, man.

    For example, if you do a lot of photoshop work, or video editing, or rendering, or other applications that are multithreaded well, your CPU is doing a LOT for you, and will trash an i5.

    If you had just an i5-4670 that was locked and couldn't be overclocked, the upgrade was huge, because you can overclock now.
    If you're running three or four graphics cards, your CPU will handle it better than an i5 would.
    Also, your motherboard, being socket 2011, will probably last longer, which could be a long-term benefit.

    There are plus-es and minus-es to every choice, is what I'm saying.
  16. DarkSable said:
    Geek Jed said:
    Im not pissy man, I'm just saying you guys are right. I should have taken that money and fixed up my i5 4670 system.


    It's a lot of personal preference, man.

    For example, if you do a lot of photoshop work, or video editing, or rendering, or other applications that are multithreaded well, your CPU is doing a LOT for you, and will trash an i5.

    If you had just an i5-4670 that was locked and couldn't be overclocked, the upgrade was huge, because you can overclock now.
    If you're running three or four graphics cards, your CPU will handle it better than an i5 would.
    Also, your motherboard, being socket 2011, will probably last longer, which could be a long-term benefit.

    There are plus-es and minus-es to every choice, is what I'm saying.


    I know what you're saying.
  17. DarkSable said:
    1) The FX 8350 does NOT have 8 cores when it comes to gaming. Gaming is almost entirely reliant on floating-point calculations. The 4 modules that the FX 8350 have contain two "calculating cores," yes, but have to share a single FPU.

    2) The reason people say to get the i5 is because no, it's not really the best you can get for gaming. It's pretty much the exact same as an i5. The only differences between the chips is that the i7 has 8MB of L3 cashe compared to the i5's 6MB (negligible difference), and hyperthreading. Hyperthreading only gives about 30% extra performance, and it only applies to double-precision calculations, NOT the floating point calculations that any halfway-decently-coded game will be using. That means that it performs pretty much exactly the same as the i5 - in fact, a lot of people get lower framerates but smoother gameplay with hyperthreading turned off.

    Oh, and 3) ...a titan is a really dumb option, do not blow your money on it. The GTX 780ti performs BETTER than a titan at gaming, and the only things it's lacking are 3 more GB of VRAM and the compute performance.


    Most of what you wrote is horribly misinformed and downright incorrect. Ergo I am unselecting it as the best answer.

    1. All tasks, games or otherwise, are dependant on integral arithmetic. Integral arithmetic forms the backbone of discrete computing and has done so for over half a century. Floating point and vector arithmetic are afterthoughts that are bolted on as supplementary instruction sets, but the core of x86 is pure integral. 3D rendering is heavily dependant on floating point calculations, but this is entirely offloaded to the GPU.

    2. Hyperthreading allows instructions from two separate threads to be issued to the backend execution pipes in an effort to reduce the total number of unused issue slots over time. This affects all types of unprivileged instructions, not just floating point, and certainly not just double-precision floating point. I don't know where you got that information from, but it is in no way related.

    3. The occasional Hyperthreading stutter is a result of poor application coding that results from naive thread spawning. This is not caused by Hyperthreading itself, but by programmers not doing their homework.
  18. Pinhedd said:
    Most of what you wrote is horribly misinformed and downright incorrect. Ergo I am unselecting it as the best answer.
    Fair enough, though I would argue it should have been the OP's prerogative.

    1. All tasks, games or otherwise, are dependant on integral arithmetic. Integral arithmetic forms the backbone of discrete computing and has done so for over half a century. Floating point and vector arithmetic are afterthoughts that are bolted on as supplementary instruction sets, but the core of x86 is pure integral. 3D rendering is heavily dependant on floating point calculations, but this is entirely offloaded to the GPU.

    This is correct, but no, it is not entirely offloaded to the GPU. If it were, then games which supported hyperthreading would see the roughly 30% benefit that other programs which support it, such as straight number-crunchers, do. Games do not ask the CPU to make more than a handful of double-precision calculations a second - the majority of the calculations the CPU is doing are still floating-point, as it is quicker and games don't need precision out to the hundredth decimal place.


    2. Hyperthreading allows instructions from two separate threads to be issued to the backend execution pipes in an effort to reduce the total number of unused issue slots over time. This affects all types of unprivileged instructions, not just floating point, and certainly not just double-precision floating point. I don't know where you got that information from, but it is in no way related.I don't think that's correct, but I could well be wrong. If it were, then games that utilized it would see more of a benefit from it. I admit that I haven't done enough research into the technicalities of it, but every source that I've seen says that hyperthreading doesn't apply to floating point calculations. If this is incorrect, and you have a decent source I could read up on, I'd appreciate it if you could show it to me.

    3. The occasional Hyperthreading stutter is a result of poor application coding that results from naive thread spawning. This is not caused by Hyperthreading itself, but by programmers not doing their homework.
    Yes. I agree with you on this... and if you read what I said, I in fact agree with you there, too. Nowhere did I say that it was an issue with hyperthreading that was causing stutter, I said it was the fault of poorly implemented code.
  19. DarkSable said:
    Pinhedd said:
    Most of what you wrote is horribly misinformed and downright incorrect. Ergo I am unselecting it as the best answer.
    Understand why you did that, but bad form - it was selected by the OP, so it was the OP's prerogative.

    1. All tasks, games or otherwise, are dependant on integral arithmetic. Integral arithmetic forms the backbone of discrete computing and has done so for over half a century. Floating point and vector arithmetic are afterthoughts that are bolted on as supplementary instruction sets, but the core of x86 is pure integral. 3D rendering is heavily dependant on floating point calculations, but this is entirely offloaded to the GPU.

    This is correct, but no, it is not entirely offloaded to the GPU. If it were, then games which supported hyperthreading would see the roughly 30% benefit that other programs which support it, such as straight number-crunchers, do. Games do not ask the CPU to make more than a handful of double-precision calculations a second - the majority of the calculations the CPU is doing are still floating-point, as it is quicker and games don't need precision out to the hundredth decimal place.


    2. Hyperthreading allows instructions from two separate threads to be issued to the backend execution pipes in an effort to reduce the total number of unused issue slots over time. This affects all types of unprivileged instructions, not just floating point, and certainly not just double-precision floating point. I don't know where you got that information from, but it is in no way related.I don't think that's correct, but I could well be wrong. If it were, then games that utilized it would see more of a benefit from it. I admit that I haven't done enough research into the technicalities of it, but every source that I've seen says that hyperthreading doesn't apply to floating point calculations. If this is incorrect, and you have a decent source I could read up on, I'd appreciate it if you could show it to me.

    3. The occasional Hyperthreading stutter is a result of poor application coding that results from naive thread spawning. This is not caused by Hyperthreading itself, but by programmers not doing their homework.
    Yes. I agree with you on this... and if you read what I said, I in fact agreed with you in this there, too. Nowhere did I say that it was an issue with hyperthreading that was causing stutter, I said it was the fault of poorly implemented code.



    1. The best answer is supposed to be given to the best answer, not the best uneducated guess.

    2. When 3D APIs are used, rendering is performed by the GPU. The CPU is responsible for executing the API calls to setup the state necessary for the rendering operation to complete properly, but the heavy lifting is done by the GPU. This is why modern GPUs are little more than arrays of floating-point vector machines. The CPU sets up the state and then moves on. Games do make use of floating point arithmetic, but it's for logical reasons only, such as calculating damage, moving around in space, or through software driven physics engines such as Havok or the PhysX on the CPU. Even then, this is bad form and is just asking for performance issues.

    The overwhelming majority of all calculations that the CPU performs will be logical operations performed on fixed point integer numbers. Equality tests, inequality tests, boolean algebra, shift and rotate, address generation for load and store operations, branch target computation, in addition to the traditional integer add/subtract/multiply/divide that are used like crazy. Even in a fairly CPU driven game, floating point operations will account for an extremely small fraction of the total code. If you've ever wondered why Intel's quad core microprocessors stomp AMD's octal core microprocessors it's because the Haswell microarchitecture can perform four primitive scalar integer operations per clock cycle along with up to 4 memory operations (Sandy/Ivy perform 3 and 3). The FX series microprocessors can perform only two. So, for an application with a traditionally fixed level of concurrency (gaming), the Haswell wins out every time by up to a 100% margin core for core and clock for clock, but when concurrency is increased they trade blows clock for clock because 8 cores performing two operations per cycle is the same as 4 cores performing four operations per cycle.

    3. It most definitely is correct, but there's a reason why games traditionally don't benefit from it. Hyperthreading allows for more total work to be done within the same number of cycles, but in order for it to be an effective technology it cannot discriminate against running tasks. When two tasks are competing for resources as opposed to having exclusivity over the resources the total resource utilization will be higher but the completion time of both tasks will be pushed back. For example, if tasks A and B are run sequentially on the same microprocessor, task A will finish in 1 time unit, and task B will finish 1 time unit later for a total runtime of 2 time units. If they are both run concurrently on a hyperthreaded microprocessor, both tasks may finish after 1.7 total time units as a result of the greater resource utilization. Task B finishes earlier, but task A finishes later. Gaming is very sensitive to these real time variations, so having task A delayed by 0.7 time units may cripple performance if task B is not essential to the game's performance. Game developers have to be careful to work around this.
  20. DarkSable said:
    Yep, you're going to be set for a long time. :)

    You should update your hardware sig, though. ;)


    As soon as I install all ordered components :) 2 or 3 days at most, cant wait.

    For other discussion, well it's educative at some points but its still annoying to look at those "fights". I selected best answer because that was fastest and most simple explanation even though I dont know 100% what everything exactly means and I'm still learning. He helped me at that point and after selecting best solution there shouldnt be any necessary discussion.

    Thanks everyone anyways. I throwed a lot of money on that AMD FX8350 with different motherboards those extra 100$ for i7 is nothing compared to that.
  21. I got I7 and it's not very useful for gaming really. I mean, it's good sure, but I measured the CPU usage and such and came to conclusion that Hyper-Threading did nothing worth of a note for me.

    Kinda wasted money really, but oh well, it's good for the e-peen purposes, plus there was a sale on those in my area, so f*ck it.
  22. Gaidax said:
    I got I7 and it's not very useful for gaming really. I mean, it's good sure, but I measured the CPU usage and such and came to conclusion that Hyper-Threading did nothing worth of a note for me.

    Kinda wasted money really, but oh well, it's good for the e-peen purposes, plus there was a sale on those in my area, so f*ck it.


    When you say not very useful it's meaning that it's not good enough. And that is why I opened this thread. Are you saying that i5 is more usefull / better then i7 or it's better for price/performance ?

    Also despite hyperthreading from founded informations seems like that i5 4670k is performing same at streaming aswel. I'm confused.
  23. dsr07mm said:
    Gaidax said:
    I got I7 and it's not very useful for gaming really. I mean, it's good sure, but I measured the CPU usage and such and came to conclusion that Hyper-Threading did nothing worth of a note for me.

    Kinda wasted money really, but oh well, it's good for the e-peen purposes, plus there was a sale on those in my area, so f*ck it.


    When you say not very useful it's meaning that it's not good enough. And that is why I opened this thread. Are you saying that i5 is more usefull / better then i7 or it's better for price/performance ?

    Also despite hyperthreading from founded informations seems like that i5 4670k is performing same at streaming aswel. I'm confused.


    Well I told you my opinion, if I could get back in time and save 100$ by going I5, I would have done it, because I7 is nice and all, but it's pretty much a "pay 100$ and MAYBE you will get like up to 15% boost in something you barely use IF it supports the thing to begin with".

    And honestly, looking at your current setup, I'm not even sure what kind of boost you expect to get anyway? Going from FX8350 to Haswell I5 is not really noticeable anyway, I mean I5 is better, but by what? 10%? What's the point?

    GPU upgrade I can understand, although what you have is really decent as it is, but CPU makes no sense to me.
  24. dsr07mm said:
    Also despite hyperthreading from founded informations seems like that i5 4670k is performing same at streaming aswel. I'm confused.

    I7 should very well handle streaming better than an I5.
  25. vmN said:
    dsr07mm said:
    Also despite hyperthreading from founded informations seems like that i5 4670k is performing same at streaming aswel. I'm confused.

    I7 should very well handle streaming better than an I5.


    Thats what I wanted to know. I do have capture card and other E8400 which can barely handle 720p streaming on twitch but I would like to stream new games like BF4/Titan without any issues on single PC. With fx8350 I didnt had really too much issues when I used OBS and I used default preset, but also in less CPU intensive games increasing preset to FAST quality was much better at same 2.7 bitrate, so I expect better performing with using higher preset and not loosing performances at the same time. Anyways CPU is at my door, just need to wait for my mobo until end of the week.

    MSI Z87-G45 GAMING is mobo, I know there were better and worse mobos but this was my budget without going into bank and making credit for this. It supports SLI but 8x which is not really terrible from what I've found. My primary upgrade with this PC is SSD, then 1600mhz maybe to something better since they are old, and then single 780ti with potential SLI sometime in future. As I said I'm playing 1080p resolution with vsync on and AA not more then 2x. So I should be fine.

    Once again thanks for helping me out in my doubts, I will pick solution based on my opinion.

    Thanks !
  26. Capture card is a dying "race". all I7 and fx 8xxx + should be able handle 1080p 60fps streaming, I5 might haven't tested or anything.
    It might depend on your internet connection, you can reduce the traffic by making your CPU work harder, and the other way around.

    You can always ask people for help on the settings. OBS is the application that can use the less resources and giving the best output(if configured correctly).

    The difference between 8x and 16x is minimal and wont be noticed.
  27. I do know a lot about streaming and settings but I appreciate your suggestion. FX is definitely capable of handling that but it's kinda "shaky". I'm perfectionist in "smoothness" of gameplay so I definitely can see that it's not 100% capable enough in some heavy cpu intensive games.

    With a lot early alpha releases and my youtube/twitch job with AMD platform on both CPU/GPU I'm feeling like "wait for patches or better optimization and it's gonna be better" while Intel/Nvidia is eating most of that without issues even if it's not completely optimized or in final stage.

    It's dying "race" I agree but again it's kinda handy for making more space since most of new HD capture cards has their intern compressors and they are delivering video footage at h264 compressed files in really small filesize at same quality as what i would have after rendering. Also for 1080p recording you need and faster/bigger HDD usually so for my usage it's really handy :)
  28. I personally use an i7 4770k. I upgraded from the fx 8350 as well. For graphics, I use the EVGA GTX 770 SC. So we're pretty much looking at the same rig. I only have 8gb of some standard 1600mhz ram. Here's my frame rates on some popular games:
    Rust 120FPS+
    DayZ (Mod) 60-120 (Depends on the server)
    DayZ (Standalone) 60-100
    ArmA 3 (Single Player) 60-102
    ArmA 3 (Multi Player) 50-90 (Depends on the server)
    Battlefield 4 75-120
    All of these are on the max settings as well.
    What I love about this set up as well, when rendering video, I can use the cuda cores from the 770, or the processor. Both work FANTASTIC.
    As far as streaming and recording game play goes, you're in luck. The GTX 770 has implemented hardware that pertains to recording/streaming. It's called shadowplay (Just incase you didn't know haha) and it can be found in the GeForece Experience panel. Shadowplay has built in twitch.tv streaming, and hd recording. I personally only lose 1-3 frames while streaming or recording in hd. It also includes separate audio files for editing. It separates voice and game sounds, just so if you scream and don't want it in the video it's possible.
    I really recommend the i7 and your rig looks pretty great!
  29. ghostarcher12 said:
    I personally use an i7 4770k. I upgraded from the fx 8350 as well. For graphics, I use the EVGA GTX 770 SC. So we're pretty much looking at the same rig. I only have 8gb of some standard 1600mhz ram. Here's my frame rates on some popular games:
    Rust 120FPS+
    DayZ (Mod) 60-120 (Depends on the server)
    DayZ (Standalone) 60-100
    ArmA 3 (Single Player) 60-102
    ArmA 3 (Multi Player) 50-90 (Depends on the server)
    Battlefield 4 75-120
    All of these are on the max settings as well.
    What I love about this set up as well, when rendering video, I can use the cuda cores from the 770, or the processor. Both work FANTASTIC.
    As far as streaming and recording game play goes, you're in luck. The GTX 770 has implemented hardware that pertains to recording/streaming. It's called shadowplay (Just incase you didn't know haha) and it can be found in the GeForece Experience panel. Shadowplay has built in twitch.tv streaming, and hd recording. I personally only lose 1-3 frames while streaming or recording in hd. It also includes separate audio files for editing. It separates voice and game sounds, just so if you scream and don't want it in the video it's possible.
    I really recommend the i7 and your rig looks pretty great!


    Those numbers I was never able to achieve with FX8350 + 7950 !

    Rust 40-70FPS (simple graphics)
    DayZ (Mod) 20-50
    DayZ (Standalone) 40-60
    Battlefield 4 75-120 maybe but on high presets

    Also do you use HBAO / SSAO and AA more then 2x ? Since I'm not going to use that, and still those are amazing numbers so for the first time I'm feeling good about upgrade.

    Also never tried CUDA neither shadowplay so I'm definitely looking forward in testing that. I also have standard 1600mhz ram. All in all I was never more happy for getting this good hardware. In country where 250$ is average payment (not counting capital city and really high jobs where you need connection not school), this hardware from income on youtube is like dream come true :)

    Thanks for those numbers ghostarcher12.
  30. dsr07mm said:
    ghostarcher12 said:
    I personally use an i7 4770k. I upgraded from the fx 8350 as well. For graphics, I use the EVGA GTX 770 SC. So we're pretty much looking at the same rig. I only have 8gb of some standard 1600mhz ram. Here's my frame rates on some popular games:
    Rust 120FPS+
    DayZ (Mod) 60-120 (Depends on the server)
    DayZ (Standalone) 60-100
    ArmA 3 (Single Player) 60-102
    ArmA 3 (Multi Player) 50-90 (Depends on the server)
    Battlefield 4 75-120
    All of these are on the max settings as well.
    What I love about this set up as well, when rendering video, I can use the cuda cores from the 770, or the processor. Both work FANTASTIC.
    As far as streaming and recording game play goes, you're in luck. The GTX 770 has implemented hardware that pertains to recording/streaming. It's called shadowplay (Just incase you didn't know haha) and it can be found in the GeForece Experience panel. Shadowplay has built in twitch.tv streaming, and hd recording. I personally only lose 1-3 frames while streaming or recording in hd. It also includes separate audio files for editing. It separates voice and game sounds, just so if you scream and don't want it in the video it's possible.
    I really recommend the i7 and your rig looks pretty great!


    Those numbers I was never able to achieve with FX8350 + 7950 !

    Rust 40-70FPS (simple graphics)
    DayZ (Mod) 20-50
    DayZ (Standalone) 40-60
    Battlefield 4 75-120 maybe but on high presets

    Also do you use HBAO / SSAO and AA more then 2x ? Since I'm not going to use that, and still those are amazing numbers so for the first time I'm feeling good about upgrade.

    Also never tried CUDA neither shadowplay so I'm definitely looking forward in testing that. I also have standard 1600mhz ram. All in all I was never more happy for getting this good hardware. In country where 250$ is average payment (not counting capital city and really high jobs where you need connection not school), this hardware from income on youtube is like dream come true :)

    Thanks for those numbers ghostarcher12.


    haha no problem! Off hand I don't remember what I have my HBAO / SSAO set to. But I know I keep my AA at 8x on ArmA 3 and DayZ. Glad to see you're happy about an Epic build! :)
  31. Gaidax said:
    I got I7 and it's not very useful for gaming really. I mean, it's good sure, but I measured the CPU usage and such and came to conclusion that Hyper-Threading did nothing worth of a note for me.

    Kinda wasted money really, but oh well, it's good for the e-peen purposes, plus there was a sale on those in my area, so f*ck it.


    CPU usage is an absolutely terrible metric to use for measuring the effectiveness of HT
  32. Ok i got my CPU and thermal paste noctua NT-H1. I'm guessing it's fine thermal paste and shouldnt be a problem.

    After reading A LOT in last couple days I found something about "ihs removal" and decreasing temperatures. Now I'm worried. As my signature says I'm currently having EVO212 and I really do hope that I can achieve atleast 4.2/4.3 with 1.200 voltage and still temperatures under 80c in Prime95 ?

    Is that even reasonable expectation ?

    Anyways I dont worry about overclock very much, from benchmarks I see that i7 4770k on stock perform even better by 1-3fps in some intensive games rather then 4.2 overklocked, but since I had FX8350 I want to pass that 4.0ghz and feel good about that.

    With that being said, summer is coming and temperatures are going to be like in hell here so I need new cooling system. I have 2 options but I believe that you guys will suggest me something even better.

    I wouldnt go over 230/240$.

    Suggestion #1. Even though I have air cooler, looking at Noctua nh-d14 seems like that it performs more then 50% effective then some water coolers. It cost around 120$ here.

    Suggestion #2. This is highest priced in my country. Cooler Master Eisberg Prestige 120L, RL-EB12-16FK-R1 at around 200$.

    And something as suggestion #3 which I wanted on my FX8350 before I realized that issue is not overheating is Cooler Master Nepton 280L, RL-N28L-20PK-R1, double 120mm fans I believe but that would require modification on my case and putting those radiators on my case not inside I believe, and it's only 30$ cheaper comparing to suggestion #3.

    So shortly,

    Is EVO212 enough to get 4.2 on i7 4770k if chip is good overclocker with temperatures under 80c ?

    Which cooler of those 3 should I get or even something else ?
  33. evo 212 can keep a 4770k stable at 4.2 with temperatures under 80c.

    I would recommend noctua NH-D14
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