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Building first gaming computer HELP approx 2000 dollars. Parts advise needed.

Comments: I am completely inexperienced in computer building and computer things in general. I need to know if all the parts I chose are compatible. I plan on upgrading this computer in the future with more RAM, another gtx 780, and a 1440p monitor. I need help choosing a case that can fit the things I list, as well as my upgrades and another hard drive.
Approximate Purchase Date: within a few months
Budget Range: around 2000
System Usage: Gaming, schoolwork, browsing, etc.
Are you buying a monitor: Not yet
Do you need to buy OS: Yes
Preferred Website: Newegg
Overclocking: Maybe, im scared to
SLI: In the future
Your Monitor Resolution: 1920x1080 and 1440p in the future
Parts:
Mobo:http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128562
PCU:http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116940
Cooler:http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835106178
RAM:http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231659
GPU:http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130917
PSU:http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817182188
Primary storage:http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820147193
2nd storage:http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822236624
OS:http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832416776
Optical:http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827136268
More Comments: I would love additional advise on better options for: RAM, PSU, Cooler. I would love to know a motherboard I can have the i7 4820k on that will allow for 2 GTX 780's in SLI and at least 4 RAM slots where I can put 8 gb strips in (maximum 32gb). Since the price is high, I want all quality parts. Have no clue what cases will fit these things or your suggestions. Thanks!
11 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about building gaming computer approx 2000 dollars parts advise needed
  1. Best answer
    PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2VeMo
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2VeMo/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2VeMo/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($304.99 @ NCIX US)
    CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($74.99 @ Mwave)
    Motherboard: Asus Maximus VI Hero ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($197.27 @ TigerDirect)
    Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($158.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($145.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Hitachi Deskstar 7K2000 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($99.94 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($489.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Cooler Master HAF 932 Advanced ATX Full Tower Case ($119.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($114.99 @ NCIX US)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - OEM (64-bit) ($99.98 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $1827.10

    Is there a reason you want a lga 2011 CPU? What kind of school work are you doing where that is needed?

    I came in well under 2k without sacrificing quality anywhere, I actually went through to up the quality of some parts since I had so much left over.
  2. Will I be safe with 850w when I SLI another gtx 780 in the future? And can that mobo SLI? If i wanted to add more storage would I be good with all of that? Sorry if these questions are dumb.
  3. Generally good build.

    My suggestions to change:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835608024 - Special Edition Noctua cooler for socket 2011, Noctua make the best air coolers this one is superb.

    RAM is fine.

    For the GPU get This 780 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814487003 - It's the same price and comes factory overclocked with a superior cooler and by EVGA as well.

    It was all going so well until I saw the rosewill PSU...
    Go for this one: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139044
    Made by Seasonic, One of the best if not the very best PSU maker. It is platinum rated 860W instead of Bronze 1000W which means it's vastly more efficient and of a much better build quality and it can run 780 SLI

    Other parts are fine.

    My case suggestion: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811139010

    By the way are you willing to purchase from other PC part sites if you get a good deal/price discount? I.e shop around to get the best parts If so I'll produce a build for you.
  4. woltej1 said:
    PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2VeMo
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2VeMo/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2VeMo/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($304.99 @ NCIX US)
    CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($74.99 @ Mwave)
    Motherboard: Asus Maximus VI Hero ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($197.27 @ TigerDirect)
    Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($158.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($145.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Hitachi Deskstar 7K2000 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($99.94 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($489.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Cooler Master HAF 932 Advanced ATX Full Tower Case ($119.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($114.99 @ NCIX US)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - OEM (64-bit) ($99.98 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $1827.10

    Is there a reason you want a lga 2011 CPU? What kind of school work are you doing where that is needed?

    I came in well under 2k without sacrificing quality anywhere, I actually went through to up the quality of some parts since I had so much left over.


    Will I be safe with 850w when I SLI another gtx 780 in the future? And can that mobo SLI? If i wanted to add more storage would I be good with all of that? Sorry if these questions are dumb
  5. Yea, 750 is recommended so this 850, which is extremely high quality, will give you plenty of head room and future proofing. That board is amazing, full featured and one of the best OC boards out there if you decide to go that route. So yes it will SLI. If you need another HDD just plug it in. Make sure to do some research on how to set up a SSD primary drive with HDD as mass storage.
  6. AshyCFC said:
    Generally good build.

    My suggestions to change:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835608024 - Special Edition Noctua cooler for socket 2011, Noctua make the best air coolers this one is superb.

    RAM is fine.

    For the GPU get This 780 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814487003 - It's the same price and comes factory overclocked with a superior cooler and by EVGA as well.

    It was all going so well until I saw the rosewill PSU...
    Go for this one: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139044
    Made by Seasonic, One of the best if not the very best PSU maker. It is platinum rated 860W instead of Bronze 1000W which means it's vastly more efficient and of a much better build quality and it can run 780 SLI

    Other parts are fine.

    My case suggestion: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811139010

    By the way are you willing to purchase from other PC part sites if you get a good deal/price discount? I.e shop around to get the best parts If so I'll produce a build for you.


    I am fine with purchasing from multiple places. That 780 ti cost 200 more dollars, i plan on doing SLI with two normal 780's later. Would i need 1000w for those in the future? How can I know if a case will fit everything? I would like to shop around myself for a cheap one that is user friendly. I have never built a computer, so all this is quite daunting.
  7. woltej1 said:
    Yea, 750 is recommended so this 850, which is extremely high quality, will give you plenty of head room and future proofing. That board is amazing, full featured and one of the best OC boards out there if you decide to go that route. So yes it will SLI. If you need another HDD just plug it in. Make sure to do some research on how to set up a SSD primary drive with HDD as mass storage.

    Thanks! I guess there is a way to mess up the storage? Sounds scary... I will look into that.
  8. PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2VfFB
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2VfFB/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2VfFB/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($239.99 @ Newegg)
    CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($79.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: Asus Maximus VI Hero ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($199.79 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($84.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($83.98 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Green 1TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($699.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: Thermaltake VL80001W2Z ATX Mid Tower Case ($45.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA 1000G2 1000W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($258.98 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($20.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $1814.67
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-18 00:53 EST-0500)

    Little cheaper but, price efficient.
  9. Sorry I meant this 780: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130942 - looks the same as the TI :(

    Anyway my build idea for you:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($249.99 @ Microcenter)
    CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($74.99 @ Mwave)
    Motherboard: Asus Maximus VI Hero ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($197.27 @ TigerDirect)
    Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-2400 Memory ($148.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Kingston SSDNow V300 Series 240GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($124.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($87.50 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($314.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($314.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: Corsair 500R Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair 860W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($189.99 @ Amazon)
    Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Microcenter)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($92.99 @ B&H)
    Total: $1922.67
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-18 00:51 EST-0500)

    SLI 770 perform faster than a single 780 and a single 780 ti

    That said if you want to get SLI 780's in the future go for the single 780.

    Just so you know, here's the same build with a single 780 ti

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($304.99 @ NCIX US)
    CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($74.99 @ Mwave)
    Motherboard: Asus Maximus VI Hero ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($197.27 @ TigerDirect)
    Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-2400 Memory ($148.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Kingston SSDNow V300 Series 240GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($124.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($87.50 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: PNY GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($669.99 @ Microcenter)
    Case: Corsair 500R Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair 860W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($189.99 @ NCIX US)
    Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Microcenter)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($92.99 @ B&H)
    Total: $2017.68
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-18 00:55 EST-0500)
  10. Don't ever SLI 2gb 770s, pointless. If there's something a single 770 cannot handle, then 2 of them will be buffered by their 2gb VRAM limit.
  11. Hm, reading around on Toms it didn't seem like too bad of an idea.

    That's a shame then, I guess this build or the 780 ti one are my suggestion then:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($304.99 @ NCIX US)
    CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($74.99 @ Mwave)
    Motherboard: Asus Maximus VI Hero ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($197.27 @ TigerDirect)
    Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-2400 Memory ($148.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Kingston SSDNow V300 Series 240GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($124.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($87.50 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($509.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Corsair 500R Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair 860W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($189.99 @ NCIX US)
    Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Microcenter)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($92.99 @ B&H)
    Total: $1857.68
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-18 01:11 EST-0500)

    Edit - Improved the GTX 770 SLI build to 4GB, had to cut the 4770k to 4670k though. The 4670k is still a strong gaming processor and will be plenty good enough for the OP.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($228.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($74.99 @ Mwave)
    Motherboard: Asus Maximus VI Hero ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($197.27 @ TigerDirect)
    Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-2400 Memory ($148.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Kingston SSDNow V300 Series 240GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($124.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($87.50 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 770 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($346.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 770 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($346.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: Corsair 500R Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair 860W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($189.99 @ Amazon)
    Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Microcenter)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($92.99 @ B&H)
    Total: $1965.67
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-18 01:14 EST-0500)
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