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what is a good cpu for gaming,virtulization,photo shop, and video editing

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February 18, 2014 1:17:12 PM

I am looking into building a new pc for myself and my girlfriend to use. I wanted to know which CPU would be at least decent at doing gaming, virtualization, photo shop, and video editing (I will not want to overclock). The gaming will be moderate and highest resolution at 1080p. The virtualization will be VM 10. The photo shop and video editing will mainly be used in order to make YouTube videos and edit saved game footage. I know most people are going to right away jump onto an Intel i7 but for the entire build I was only looking into spending around $700-$800 so I don't want all of my money to just towards the CPU when I still need to purchase everything else. Another question is when looking into a motherboard should I get one that specifically is for gaming or will anyone that fits my needs do just fine? Also if you anything in mind (other parts, builds, ideas, anything) I am open to suggestions because this will be my first ever build and it's a little overwhelming to look into all the things out there and do research on them all.
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February 18, 2014 1:24:35 PM

Gaming and video editing, make sure to get a CPU with threads!
i7 4770/K or Xeon 1230 V3 ( xeon = i7 has no integrated graphics card also costs less )

Video editing? What programmes will you use?

After Effects / Adobe software and so on will support most CUDA ( nvidia )
Sony vegas instead, open CL ( AMD )
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February 18, 2014 1:25:14 PM

FX 8320~8350
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February 18, 2014 1:31:56 PM

going with an i7 for that build would be stupid, just get a nice i5 quadcore and you're good for a couple years. doesn't need to be a k-model, since i don't think you'll overclock.

for a graphics card you should have a look at the new nvidia gtx 750 ti which should have plenty of power for your usage scenario and uses extremely little electricity.

try to fit something like a 120gb samsung 840 evo into the budget and your rig will fly.

cheers!
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February 18, 2014 1:35:42 PM

RulesSpew said:
Gaming and video editing, make sure to get a CPU with threads!
i7 4770/K or Xeon 1230 V3 ( xeon = i7 has no integrated graphics card also costs less )

Video editing? What programmes will you use?

After Effects / Adobe software and so on will support most CUDA ( nvidia )
Sony vegas instead, open CL ( AMD )


for gaming the i7 is much worse value than an i5 and i doubt he will need it for making youtube videos and cutting gaming footage.
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February 18, 2014 1:40:24 PM

I am very happy with my i7-3820. Massive performance for price
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February 18, 2014 1:43:19 PM

Ahmadjon said:
FX 8320~8350


those may be good for video editing and conversion, but they have a tdp of 125w. if you don't care for power consumption, go ahead, otherwise a 84w i5 would be the wiser choice.
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February 18, 2014 1:46:09 PM

fokka said:
Ahmadjon said:
FX 8320~8350


those may be good for video editing and conversion, but they have a tdp of 125w. if you don't care for power consumption, go ahead, otherwise a 84w i5 would be the wiser choice.


TDP is a measure of heat not power.
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February 18, 2014 3:39:47 PM

FloppyNacho said:
fokka said:
Ahmadjon said:
FX 8320~8350


those may be good for video editing and conversion, but they have a tdp of 125w. if you don't care for power consumption, go ahead, otherwise a 84w i5 would be the wiser choice.


TDP is a measure of heat not power.


Um, no.

TDP stands for Thermal Design Power.

Since CPUs don't vibrate or make noise (at least nothing more than a negligible amount of stuff in the very high frequency range) all electrical energy that goes into the chip is dissipated as heat.

The TDP is a value, measured in watts (the measure of power), which should not be exceeded under normal operating conditions. It is possible to exceed the TDP under extreme operating conditions such as running Intel Burn Test, or when mathematically focusing on the dynamic power dissipation that occurs during the switching period, but as an average of normal usage it shouldn't be exceeded.
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