Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Getting 10/100 instead of 1000 Mbps Network Speeds

Tags:
  • Computers
  • Networking
  • Cable
Last response: in Networking
Share
February 19, 2014 10:27:25 AM

I have a TL-SG1016D - TP-LINK 16-Port Gigabit Ethernet 10/100/1000 switch. We have 5 computers and a laptop. All 6 computers have a 1000 Mbps network card. I have cat6 cable run to all 6 computers. 4 of the computers are in the main office, they all get 1000 Mbps. However, one machine in a more remote office, is getting 100 Mbps most of the time, and sometimes as slow as 10 Mbps. This machine is probably only requiring a cable length of about 100-150 feet or so, while the others are 50-75 feet max. It's well within the range of 100 Meters for cat6 cable.

Here is what I have done so far to try and resurrect the problem:
1. I made a 2nd cat6 cable. It has the same exact problem. I have plugged both cables into the laptop, both get 100 Mbps. When I plug the laptop into one of the shorter cables in the main room, it gets 1000 Mbps. I have also replaced the network card on the computer that is in the remote room, with the same results. So I believe network cards have been ruled out.
2. Maybe it's the cable? I just ran cat5e on the floor, not through the ceiling, to the same room to test it out, and it's having the same problem. Since it's on the floor, I was able to run it back to where the switch was. Still the same problem with the laptop. I have a refrigerator in the room, so maybe it was a shielding issue? Nope, not when I run the cable back to the switch area. And I also tried unplugging the refrigerator. Same problem with the 2 main cables going through the ceiling.
3. There are only two things that I can think of. Either long lengths of the cable do not work well enough, which I cannot believe, unless there's mysteriously a bad spot in each of the 3 cables I've used that has caused it to drop down to 100 Mbps? Or the crimping jobs I am doing on the connectors is not as good as the first 4 that i did. So my only solution in my mind is to keep making cables until i get a nice 1000 Mbps. I hate to go down that road forever and it be something else. Is there anything else that it can possibly be or is there anything that I can try?

More about : 100 1000 mbps network speeds

February 19, 2014 10:37:11 AM

Lets start with process of elimination instead of definition of insanity. :) 

Validate that all the ports are properly functioning on the router by swapping a few connection on the router end. take a known good 1gb connection ( computer and cable) and cycle through all ports on the router.

Inspect the router's jacks for bent pins.

Take a known good cable and a known good router port and connect them to the unknown computer. (move the router to the computer, it doesn't need to be connected to anything else.)

Take a known good computer and a known good router port and connect them to an unknown cable. (string your 150' cable to a computer 5' from the router.)

If any cables fail, run a line tester on them to identify the pin or destroy the cable.

If a computer fails perform driver updates and verify the driver settings are not limiting the NIC to 10/100.

Good luck!
m
0
l
February 19, 2014 11:53:04 AM

A cable tester should tell you how your crimping is and if it's wired properly. You can pick up a decent one for $50 or less.
m
0
l
Related resources
February 19, 2014 12:41:43 PM

I swapped jacks on the switch a few times. One of the 1 Gbps computers also gets 1 Gbps on the ports which were only giving 100 Mbps for the remote computers. Remote computers still get 100 Mbps or less on the newly assigned switch ports which are known to be working.

It's a brand new switch. I don't see any bent pins. and if it was one port that was a problem, the above would have shown that.

The laptop shows 100 Mbps on one of the "bad" cables. I have connected it to all other 4 cables known to be "good" on 1 Gbps ports and come out with 1 Gbps for each cable. Still 100 Mbps on the 3 cables made longer to go to the remote room.

I do also have a line tester that I use every time I make a cable, and all longer cables that only give 100 Mbps check out good on all 8 wires.

It can't be driver problems because the laptop gets 100 Mbps on one cable and 1 Gbps on another cable.

Logically speaking, it must be the cable. The question is why? Lengths? Poorly made? And why would all 8 ports show as good on a wire tester but the cable limits transfers to 100 Mbps? I would think it either works or doesn't work.

Right back to Insanity mode right? lol
m
0
l
February 19, 2014 12:43:25 PM

Hawkeye22 said:
A cable tester should tell you how your crimping is and if it's wired properly. You can pick up a decent one for $50 or less.


Are there any cable testers that do more than light up for each wire connection? I have one that tells me if the signal works. I suppose if the crimp job is not so good, then maybe that's why the connection speed is limited? Are there more advanced testers that can tell me what speed is applicable?
m
0
l
February 19, 2014 12:58:57 PM

Sure, just look on Amazon. Testers can tell you if you have crossed pairs, an open short, disconnected wires, the length of the ethernet cable, and much more depending on how much you want to spend.
m
0
l
February 20, 2014 7:44:48 AM

I just purchased one that can tell me more about what's wrong with a cable. Now the only question remains. If a simple cable tester shows all green lights for the 8 wires, is it still possible that there is a problem with the wires that would cause the machine to use a lower frequency (lower transfer speed rate)?
m
0
l
February 20, 2014 11:21:39 AM

If the tester shows all pairs wired properly, then the cable will work as long as the length isn't over the limit and you aren't doing something silly like running the cable near an electric panel/box, thus causing interference.
m
0
l
February 20, 2014 11:52:56 AM

Do a laptop test one of your longer cables before stringing/running it. With all the testing you have already done, this sounds like either an environmental variable or your cable has too much signal bleed to go the maximum specified length for GB connections. You may need to use an outdoor class shielded cat6 cable, or an active ethernet extender or both.

http://www.amazon.com/Enable-828-Gigabit-Ethernet-Exten...
m
0
l
February 20, 2014 12:05:18 PM

Quote:
However, one machine in a more remote office, is getting 100 Mbps most of the time, and sometimes as slow as 10 Mbps.


There are no other devices in the chain?
m
0
l
February 20, 2014 12:11:01 PM

dalethepcman said:
Do a laptop test one of your longer cables before stringing/running it. With all the testing you have already done, this sounds like either an environmental variable or your cable has too much signal bleed to go the maximum specified length for GB connections. You may need to use an outdoor class shielded cat6 cable, or an active ethernet extender or both.

http://www.amazon.com/Enable-828-Gigabit-Ethernet-Exten...


I did run a cat5e cable on the floor in approximately the same length to try and see if that would make a difference. I checked it in the room and outside of the room back where all of the "good" computers are. Same result, 100 Mbps. I haven't made a shorter length yet to verify if it's length or not. I'm starting to be a little skeptical of the RJ-45 connectors. is it possible that what I am using is good for short distances, but once you go longer, the connector isn't good enough? Or perhaps I have been crimping these ones too hard while the others in the closer rooms miraculously were done perfectly.

There are no other devices on these cables. One cable per device. But of course other computers on the switch.

m
0
l
February 20, 2014 12:31:30 PM

I didn't see anything on TP-Link's site regarding if this is a managed switch or not (doesn't look it). If it's a managed switch, make sure the port that computer is attached to is set to auto or 1000.

Also, have you tried other ports on the switch?
m
0
l
February 20, 2014 12:51:03 PM

Sounds like you have tried everything within the realm of probable. I think your cable it just not up to the task. IF you get 1gb at 100' length all day, but as soon as you go to 150' you can't get above 100 then your signal strength is just to low.

Either doom this remote PC to be 100mb, use an extender, use a higher quality cable, or possibly interconnect a switch in the remote location and connect it via uplink to the 1gb router then connect the remote PC's to that gb switch instead?

I don't think any amount of cable testing/crimping will fix this for you friend. Best of luck.
m
0
l
February 20, 2014 9:26:26 PM

Hawkeye22 said:
I didn't see anything on TP-Link's site regarding if this is a managed switch or not (doesn't look it). If it's a managed switch, make sure the port that computer is attached to is set to auto or 1000.

Also, have you tried other ports on the switch?


It's an unmanaged switch. and I've already tried swapping all of the ports, from "good" to "bad" and "bad" to "good" with the same results. I was partially convinced that maybe only the first 4-8 ports were actually gigbit and they had lied in their advertisement, but that was confirmed a negative.
m
0
l
February 20, 2014 9:29:59 PM

dalethepcman said:
Sounds like you have tried everything within the realm of probable. I think your cable it just not up to the task. IF you get 1gb at 100' length all day, but as soon as you go to 150' you can't get above 100 then your signal strength is just to low.

Either doom this remote PC to be 100mb, use an extender, use a higher quality cable, or possibly interconnect a switch in the remote location and connect it via uplink to the 1gb router then connect the remote PC's to that gb switch instead?

I don't think any amount of cable testing/crimping will fix this for you friend. Best of luck.


This is what I have been suspecting. That's why I tried a different cable that was 5e and I was getting the same results. I will try new connectors tomorrow, and if the same results, try a shorter cable. If the shorter cable works but the longer does not, then I know it's simply the length as that will have ruled out all other possibilities... And so that means I will have to start looking into cat 6a cable, which I have been somewhat interested in since I have learned that I've been running on slow network connections with my main machine for so long now. The only problem is the switches are costly and I think the best I could find for a decent price was 4 Gbps. Still 40 times faster than what I have now. and 4 times faster than what I consider really fast on the machines that I don't get to use. :) 

m
0
l
February 21, 2014 2:48:59 AM

I hope I did not miss it somewhere in this thread, but are you using patch cables or "solid" cables? When used for 10/100/1000BASE-T, the 100m limit is definded as 90m solid + 10m patch (or "stranded cable"), not 100m patch.
m
0
l
February 21, 2014 10:38:52 AM

uxswmt said:
I hope I did not miss it somewhere in this thread, but are you using patch cables or "solid" cables? When used for 10/100/1000BASE-T, the 100m limit is definded as 90m solid + 10m patch (or "stranded cable"), not 100m patch.


There's the problem with the cat 6 then. The cat 6 is stranded. The cat5e that I used as a cross-check is solid though. What's the limit on cat5e solid? I found online that it should be 90m. I'm certainly not using 90m on this run and it still has the same performance as the cat6.
m
0
l
!