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The best 600$ mid-end PC with SSD

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February 23, 2014 4:59:17 AM

Hy Tomshardware community, I am a fresh Newbie here.

I am trying to get the best decent budget mid-end PC for 600$ or under, (can go over 5$-10$ in case of price rise or shipping cost), which includes an 64GB SSD AND Windows 8.
I have used pcpartpicker.com, but couldn't get the best build, especially I don't know lots in PC hardware components. I don't need displays or peripherals.


Here is the things that the build will require:


CPU: Quad-core, over 2.5GHz, AMD or Intel. Overclocking? Not needed. Preferably CPU fan included.
Mainboard: At least 8GB RAM limit, has RAID (because I want 2 storage devices, if you need RAID?). SLI not needed.
GPU: A GTX 650Ti 1GB with 928MHz core clock is enough, I don't need more than that.
Memory: 8GB RAM with DDR3 1600MHz+.
Optical Drive: The cheap <20$ Asus DRW DVD drive is enough.
Storage 1: 500GB-1TB 7200RPM HDD.
Storage 2: 64GB SSD. I think the cheapest one is 50$.

Case: I DON'T need a gaming case, and not huge, just need to be big enough to fit the parts, with USB ports in front/side, a DVD drive slot, a 2.5 SSD slot and preferably PSU included.

Operating System: Windows 8.1 64-bit.


Last thing: Everything has to be compatible.

So, every suggestion for a close 600$ with the requirements above will I appreciate! :) 

More about : 600 mid end ssd

February 23, 2014 6:09:57 AM

Try THIS

As a note: While you can run raid with this (500gb and 64gb), you are going to be limited in the size of the raid array. If you set these up as raid 0, you will have a 240gb raid, and in raid 1 you will have 120gb. You will also have increased seek times as the controller will have to wait for the data on the hdd (slower). IMO, you would be better off running the ssd as o/s and main program drive and the hdd as data/storage.

Mark
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February 23, 2014 9:14:17 AM

markwp said:
Try THIS

As a note: While you can run raid with this (500gb and 64gb), you are going to be limited in the size of the raid array. If you set these up as raid 0, you will have a 240gb raid, and in raid 1 you will have 120gb. You will also have increased seek times as the controller will have to wait for the data on the hdd (slower). IMO, you would be better off running the ssd as o/s and main program drive and the hdd as data/storage.

Mark
The OP asked if RAID is required when using 2 storage devices; the answer is no.

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February 24, 2014 12:48:21 PM

FX 8350 4 the CPU.
GA-990FXA-UD3 4 the MB.
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February 24, 2014 7:01:32 PM

@Mark: Yes, my main idea for a SSD is having to run Windows on it with a several frequently-used programs and maybe games, then the other programs and files on the HDD.
I like your part selections, however, does the PSU have to be 500W? The estimated wattage says only 304W, so a 350W-400W PSU should be enough, right?
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February 25, 2014 1:10:50 AM

BlasterX said:
@Mark: Yes, my main idea for a SSD is having to run Windows on it with a several frequently-used programs and maybe games, then the other programs and files on the HDD.
I like your part selections, however, does the PSU have to be 500W? The estimated wattage says only 304W, so a 350W-400W PSU should be enough, right?


I made a little PCPartPicker for you.
http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZITf

It is 633 dollars but I couldnt go cheaper.
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Best solution

February 25, 2014 5:51:41 AM

BlasterX said:
@Mark: Yes, my main idea for a SSD is having to run Windows on it with a several frequently-used programs and maybe games, then the other programs and files on the HDD.
I like your part selections, however, does the PSU have to be 500W? The estimated wattage says only 304W, so a 350W-400W PSU should be enough, right?


I based that build on your budget. You could certainly use a smaller psu, but why? The "bargain" 400w psu's that are $20 or so seem attractive (lotsa watts, little bucks), but in reality they could very well cost you ten times the purchase price if they crap out. When a cheap, unprotected (bargain) psu decides to die, it is not unheard of for that failure to also take the motherboard, cpu and/or gpu along for the ride. In really extreme cases, if the filter caps decide to dump, it is entirely possible that the psu will flame up - and if you're not home to get out the fire extinguisher, things could get ugly.

I'm sure you will find many other opinions that cheap psu's are fine or that even "quality" psu's will crap out, burn, etc. I've been building/repairing pc's for quite a while now and I have run across both types of failure (cheap/quality). But, I have NEVER run across a quality psu that has failed AND caused damage outside of the psu itself.

For the price difference, I consider a quality psu the best insurance you can buy to protect, as much as possible, the remainder of your investment.

Mark


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February 26, 2014 2:26:03 AM

markwp said:
BlasterX said:
@Mark: Yes, my main idea for a SSD is having to run Windows on it with a several frequently-used programs and maybe games, then the other programs and files on the HDD.
I like your part selections, however, does the PSU have to be 500W? The estimated wattage says only 304W, so a 350W-400W PSU should be enough, right?


I based that build on your budget. You could certainly use a smaller psu, but why? The "bargain" 400w psu's that are $20 or so seem attractive (lotsa watts, little bucks), but in reality they could very well cost you ten times the purchase price if they crap out. When a cheap, unprotected (bargain) psu decides to die, it is not unheard of for that failure to also take the motherboard, cpu and/or gpu along for the ride. In really extreme cases, if the filter caps decide to dump, it is entirely possible that the psu will flame up - and if you're not home to get out the fire extinguisher, things could get ugly.

I'm sure you will find many other opinions that cheap psu's are fine or that even "quality" psu's will crap out, burn, etc. I've been building/repairing pc's for quite a while now and I have run across both types of failure (cheap/quality). But, I have NEVER run across a quality psu that has failed AND caused damage outside of the psu itself.

For the price difference, I consider a quality psu the best insurance you can buy to protect, as much as possible, the remainder of your investment.

Mark



Wow, didn't thought of that. Ok, I think your PSU choice is better.

@ViindoPedro: I like yours as well!
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February 26, 2014 2:58:54 AM

Both builds are very good. I'd spend some more money and get CPU, MB from Viinerpedro's, the rest components from markwp's build.
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February 26, 2014 10:39:43 AM

Nikola Aslanov said:
Both builds are very good. I'd spend some more money and get CPU, MB from Viinerpedro's, the rest components from markwp's build.


So something like this:
http://pcpartpicker.com/p/30uLY
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