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i got a new battery for my laptop and its taking long to charge what can be up with it

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February 24, 2014 12:29:37 PM

I got a new battery for my. Laptop and it long to change what can be up with it

a b D Laptop
February 24, 2014 12:37:46 PM

How long have you given it?

What did the instructions that came with it say?

It's common for a first charge to take 4-8 hours.
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a b D Laptop
February 24, 2014 1:52:15 PM

Also keep in mind that 3rd party laptop batteries can have a lot of problems and very difficult to troubleshoot.
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a b D Laptop
February 25, 2014 3:04:46 AM

if your new battery is the exact same model as the previous one, besides the very first charge, it should behave the same. if you bought a bigger capasity one (in mAh) then its normal cause the charger still remains the same and will take longer to charge it. try to charge it without using it and see if time reduces.
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a b D Laptop
February 25, 2014 12:09:37 PM

Was the battery fully discharged when you received it or stored in a hot environment? Does the battery have a date of manufacture on it? Damage to the internal chemistry of a Li-Ion battery can result from being left in a state of full discharge for an extended period of time, or from extended exposure to high temperature. Also, battery life diminishes from the point of manufacture.

From: http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Battery_Power/Lithium_Ion_...

"At a 100% charge level, a typical Li-ion laptop battery that is full most of the time at 25 degrees Celsius or 77 degrees Fahrenheit, will irreversibly lose approximately 20% capacity per year. However a battery stored inside a poorly ventilated laptop, may be subject to a prolonged exposure to much higher temperatures than 25 °C, which will significantly shorten its life. The capacity loss begins from the time the battery was manufactured, and occurs even when the battery is unused. Different storage temperatures produce different loss results: 6% loss at 0 °C/32 °F, 20% at 25 °C/77 °F, and 35% at 40 °C/104 °F. When stored at 40% charge level, these figures are reduced to 2%, 4%, 15% at 0, 25 and 40 degrees Celsius respectively."
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