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$1300 gaming pc

Looking for some help on picking out parts to build a new gaming pc. I do need an os (windows 7), mouse, keyboard, and monitor.
I'm mainly going to be playing Elder Scrolls Online. But I want to be able to play other games such as CoD if that is possible. Thanks in advance!
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More about 1300 gaming
  1. PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZumU
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZumU/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZumU/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($207.97 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-H87-D3H ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($99.24 @ Amazon)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($30.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($30.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($489.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Thermaltake Commander MS-I Epic Edition (Black/Red) ATX Mid Tower Case ($39.99 @ Microcenter)
    Power Supply: Corsair CX 600W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($54.99 @ Microcenter)
    Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.98 @ OutletPC)
    Monitor: AOC i2369V 60Hz 23.0" Monitor ($139.99 @ Amazon)
    Keyboard: Microsoft SIDEWINDER X4 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($49.99 @ Newegg)
    Mouse: Cooler Master CM Storm Xornet Wired Optical Mouse ($19.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $1324.08
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-24 19:44 EST-0500)

    slightly over but worth it.
  2. woltej1 said:
    PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZumU
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZumU/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZumU/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($207.97 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-H87-D3H ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($99.24 @ Amazon)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($30.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($30.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($489.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Thermaltake Commander MS-I Epic Edition (Black/Red) ATX Mid Tower Case ($39.99 @ Microcenter)
    Power Supply: Corsair CX 600W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($54.99 @ Microcenter)
    Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.98 @ OutletPC)
    Monitor: AOC i2369V 60Hz 23.0" Monitor ($139.99 @ Amazon)
    Keyboard: Microsoft SIDEWINDER X4 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($49.99 @ Newegg)
    Mouse: Cooler Master CM Storm Xornet Wired Optical Mouse ($19.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $1324.08
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-24 19:44 EST-0500)

    slightly over but worth it.


    Can't go over my budget.
  3. PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZvEw
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZvEw/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZvEw/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z87-D3HP ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Amazon)
    Memory: Corsair Vengeance Pro 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($144.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($489.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Corsair 500R Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair CX 600W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($54.99 @ Microcenter)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($134.94 @ OutletPC)
    Keyboard: Microsoft ANB-00001 Wired Slim Keyboard ($12.95 @ B&H)
    Total: $1284.79
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-24 19:59 EST-0500)

    Keyboard is cheap but is better than the price suggests, similar to one I use for gaming.
  4. woltej1 said:
    PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZvEw
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZvEw/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZvEw/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z87-D3HP ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Amazon)
    Memory: Corsair Vengeance Pro 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($144.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($489.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Corsair 500R Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair CX 600W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($54.99 @ Microcenter)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($134.94 @ OutletPC)
    Keyboard: Microsoft ANB-00001 Wired Slim Keyboard ($12.95 @ B&H)
    Total: $1284.79
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-24 19:59 EST-0500)

    Keyboard is cheap but is better than the price suggests, similar to one I use for gaming.


    No monitor or mouse in this one?
  5. PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZvS8
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZvS8/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZvS8/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($207.97 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-H87-D3H ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($99.24 @ Amazon)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($30.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($30.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($489.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Thermaltake Commander MS-I Epic Edition (Black/Red) ATX Mid Tower Case ($39.99 @ Microcenter)
    Power Supply: Corsair CX 600W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($54.99 @ Microcenter)
    Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.98 @ OutletPC)
    Monitor: AOC i2369V 60Hz 23.0" Monitor ($139.99 @ Amazon)
    Keyboard: Microsoft ANB-00001 Wired Slim Keyboard ($12.95 @ B&H)
    Mouse: Cooler Master CM Storm Xornet Wired Optical Mouse ($19.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $1287.04
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-24 20:05 EST-0500)

    whoops, selected wrong build.
  6. Best answer
    Sure its has a worse gpu but now you have an ssd and the 4570 and the 4670 are really the exact same. Also, the 770 is perfect for 1080p gaming the only reason why you should get the 780 is if you really want an increase in like 10 frames. Here is the build

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4570 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($192.99 @ NCIX US)
    Motherboard: ASRock H87 Pro4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($88.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($30.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($30.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($80.98 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($329.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: NZXT Source 220 ATX Mid Tower Case ($44.99 @ TigerDirect)
    Power Supply: Corsair CX 600W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($54.99 @ Microcenter)
    Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.98 @ OutletPC)
    Monitor: AOC i2369V 60Hz 23.0" Monitor ($139.99 @ Amazon)
    Keyboard: Cooler Master CM Storm Devastator Gaming Bundle Wired Gaming Keyboard w/Optical Mouse ($29.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $1184.83
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-24 21:18 EST-0500)

    BTW its waaaaaaaayyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy CHEAPER
  7. TheMohammadmo said:
    Sure its has a worse gpu but now you have an ssd and the 4570 and the 4670 are really the exact same. Also, the 770 is perfect for 1080p gaming the only reason why you should get the 780 is if you really want an increase in like 10 frames. Here is the build

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4570 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($192.99 @ NCIX US)
    Motherboard: ASRock H87 Pro4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($88.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($30.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($30.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($80.98 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($329.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: NZXT Source 220 ATX Mid Tower Case ($44.99 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: Corsair CX 600W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($64.99 @ Amazon)
    Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.98 @ Amazon)
    Monitor: AOC i2369V 60Hz 23.0" Monitor ($139.99 @ Amazon)
    Keyboard: Cooler Master CM Storm Devastator Gaming Bundle Wired Gaming Keyboard w/Optical Mouse ($29.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $1184.83
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-24 21:18 EST-0500)

    BTW its waaaaaaaayyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy CHEAPER


    +1 for this build.
  8. TheMohammadmo said:
    Sure its has a worse gpu but now you have an ssd and the 4570 and the 4670 are really the exact same. Also, the 770 is perfect for 1080p gaming the only reason why you should get the 780 is if you really want an increase in like 10 frames. Here is the build

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4570 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($192.99 @ NCIX US)
    Motherboard: ASRock H87 Pro4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($88.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($30.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($30.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($80.98 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($329.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: NZXT Source 220 ATX Mid Tower Case ($44.99 @ TigerDirect)
    Power Supply: Corsair CX 600W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($54.99 @ Microcenter)
    Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.98 @ OutletPC)
    Monitor: AOC i2369V 60Hz 23.0" Monitor ($139.99 @ Amazon)
    Keyboard: Cooler Master CM Storm Devastator Gaming Bundle Wired Gaming Keyboard w/Optical Mouse ($29.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $1184.83
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-24 21:18 EST-0500)

    BTW its waaaaaaaayyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy CHEAPER


    Fixed a couple things with your build including a better psu, and gsync compatible monitor. You really don't have to have an ssd.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Amazon)
    Motherboard: Asus Z87-K ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($109.99 @ TigerDirect)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($329.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: BitFenix Comrade ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.00 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: XFX 650W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
    Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.98 @ OutletPC)
    Monitor: Asus VG248QE 144Hz 24.0" Monitor ($276.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Keyboard: Cooler Master CM Storm Devastator Gaming Bundle Wired Gaming Keyboard w/Optical Mouse ($32.98 @ Newegg)
    Total: $1303.86
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-24 23:18 EST-0500)
  9. CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Amazon)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Asus Z87-K ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($109.99 @ TigerDirect)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.00 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($324.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: NZXT Phantom 410 (Black/Orange) ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: XFX 650W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
    Optical Drive: Asus BW-12B1ST/BLK/G/AS Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($54.99 @ Microcenter)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.98 @ OutletPC)
    Monitor: Asus VS238H-P 23.0" Monitor ($134.99 @ NCIX US)
    Keyboard: Logitech K120 Wired Standard Keyboard ($10.29 @ B&H)
    Mouse: Logitech M500 Wired Laser Mouse ($22.74 @ B&H)
    Total: $1286.89
  10. woltej1 said:
    PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZvS8
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZvS8/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZvS8/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($207.97 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-H87-D3H ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($99.24 @ Amazon)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($30.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($30.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($489.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Thermaltake Commander MS-I Epic Edition (Black/Red) ATX Mid Tower Case ($39.99 @ Microcenter)
    Power Supply: Corsair CX 600W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($54.99 @ Microcenter)
    Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.98 @ OutletPC)
    Monitor: AOC i2369V 60Hz 23.0" Monitor ($139.99 @ Amazon)
    Keyboard: Microsoft ANB-00001 Wired Slim Keyboard ($12.95 @ B&H)
    Mouse: Cooler Master CM Storm Xornet Wired Optical Mouse ($19.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $1287.04
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-24 20:05 EST-0500)

    whoops, selected wrong build.


    man I'm tired tonight... despite his previous fail links, I'm gonna +1 this, as it's properly budgeted for this price range.

    A GTX 770 does not belong here. It belongs under $900, but I can understand putting it in a $1k. A $1300? no.
  11. dude, i can't believe 1080p is the standard now, that's bogus. i mean i have a old laptop that's like over ten years old and it has a 1920x1200 resolution screen, and let me tell you, it makes a HUGE difference on gaming and everyday view. just like intel and their price cuts on pentium 4 (which i'm not going to discuss, nuff said) they are going backwards. i'm going to make a seperate thread for that. lol. to discuss that, so feel free to comment on it, i'll link the thread here.

    with that said, i mean if a graphics card can't handle anything higher then 1080p after all these years, that would be sad. i'm laughing at all the people that bought crappy lcd's all these years. as you can tell i only buy the best. i know it's expensive but it has to be right? why not get a cheaper cpu with a better gpu and lcd. makes sense right? i mean games are graphics bound and i laugh at all these people who think they have to buy an i7 just to keep up with games. that's stupid. anyways, i know a guy that has a pentium d and he's playing the latest games at high settings cause of a good graphics card, that's ridiculous. so why not get a cheaper cpu and spend more money on a lcd and graphics card? makes sense right? i really don't understand people's logic nowadays.

    trust me, with experience, i remember changing my settings from 1280x1024 to 1600x1200 and there was a HUGE difference. i can't imagine all the crappy lcd's that people are buying nowadays, and i bought this other laptop in 2003. i can't believe it's better then the standard nowadays. that's terrible. but yes, there are good high resolution lcd's out there but it's costly. but still i wouldn't imagine trying to game with 1080p nowadays, that's just horrible.
  12. Okay, so I know you've been bombarded with a lot of suggestions, but I'm going to toss my hat in the ring anyway :P
    http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZFeT = Nice build with great futureproofing potential.

    but

    Here's something WAY more exciting: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZGdF

    It's got more graphics processing power than any build listed yet. Sure! It's $10 over budget, but just think of the possibilities here!

    The first build is more serious than the second build, but honestly, the second build is super bad-arse.

    Actually, let me elaborate on this build.

    1. Insane graphics performance at the $1300 pricepoint. Destroys the 780.

    2. Powerful AMD processor with overclocking potential. Has 8 cores and takes advantage of the increasing number of multithreaded games.

    3. No SSD, but who cares! The SSD only helps load times, not frames per second. In a gaming build, it's secondary.

    4. 500GB HDD, but who really uses 1TB? (kind of joking here, but seriously) A casualty of a tight budget. A larger HDD wouldn't help with in-game performance and it's incredibly easy to add another HDD later.

    5. Cool red theme :P
  13. I would go with the 770 sli, but I would take an intel cpu (gtx 780 sli if you can fit it in, perhaps try redflagdeals or something). The 4770k one or the one right below the 4770k.
  14. DonQuixoteMC said:
    Okay, so I know you've been bombarded with a lot of suggestions, but I'm going to toss my hat in the ring anyway :P
    http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZFeT = Nice build with great futureproofing potential.

    but

    Here's something WAY more exciting: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZGdF

    It's got more graphics processing power than any build listed yet. Sure! It's $10 over budget, but just think of the possibilities here!

    The first build is more serious than the second build, but honestly, the second build is super bad-arse.

    Actually, let me elaborate on this build.

    1. Insane graphics performance at the $1300 pricepoint. Destroys the 780.

    2. Powerful AMD processor with overclocking potential. Has 8 cores and takes advantage of the increasing number of multithreaded games.

    3. No SSD, but who cares! The SSD only helps load times, not frames per second. In a gaming build, it's secondary.

    4. 500GB HDD, but who really uses 1TB? (kind of joking here, but seriously) A casualty of a tight budget. A larger HDD wouldn't help with in-game performance and it's incredibly easy to add another HDD later.

    5. Cool red theme :P


    You're also gimping the 2 cards with an AMD CPU. It's 4 Modules, 8 threads, and each of the threads perform terribly compared to Intels. A $160 AMD CPU belongs in an $800 build at best. OP also stated they cannot go $.01 over the $1300, and yours is $40 over, even with limited time promos. You're also leaving out the Keyboard and Mouse that the OP stated in the first post. And reminded you of later in their 3rd post.

    The budget isn't tight, you're trying to shove in SLI where it doesn't belong.
  15. ameek said:
    You're also gimping the 2 cards with an AMD CPU. It's 4 Modules, 8 threads, and each of the threads perform terribly compared to Intels. A $160 AMD CPU belongs in an $800 build at best. OP also stated they cannot go $.01 over the $1300, and yours is $40 over, even with limited time promos. You're also leaving out the Keyboard and Mouse that the OP stated in the first post. And reminded you of later in their 3rd post.

    The budget isn't tight, you're trying to shove in SLI where it doesn't belong.

    Sorry for trying to be ambitious. Sheesh.
    At time of posting it was $10 over budget. Now it has gone up, yes. And don't hate on the 8320. It's arguably just as good as an i5 (have some benchmarks) and it does have 8 actual cores. This isn't an i7 here, it's not hyperthreaded.

    Now that the prices have gone up, I'm changing my recommendation: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/302es
    Still beats a GTX 780.

    Never be boring!
  16. bro, ignore the people recommending an amd cpu. For 1300 dollars, if you get an amd cpu for gaming: you are just a blind AMD fanboy. It's pretty hard to ignore how good the 4770k is and the 4670K (i would personally get the 4770k, it's a bit more future proof, but you can't go wrong with either one). Get the intel cpu with 770 sli. SIMPLE! Or get a 780 ti with an intel cpu, and then get a second 780 ti in the future next year.

    Or get a 4770k and one gtx 780 (non ti version). Then get a second gtx 780 (non ti version) at the end of the year or in the near future.
  17. I'm actually surprised by these benchmarks: http://vr-zone.com/articles/amd-fx-8350-vs-intel-core-i7-3770k-4-8ghz-multi-gpu-gaming-performance/17494.html (I'm normally an Intel fanboy, but these benchmarks are a pretty strong case for the 8320/50. Although at this price point it's an unacceptable gap, the AMD was also up against an i7, not an i5)

    Anyway, I modified my build in the end to use the Haswell 4670K and 2 GTX 760s. (see my last post)
  18. Unfortunately the i7 4770k does not budget well into a build under $1500, nor does a GTX 780ti.

    Also, DQMC that's STILL $40 over budget. And it STILL lacks a keyboard and mouse.


    This is the basic high level look at a module's architecture.


    Shared L1 instruction cache. Shared fetch. Shared decode. Shared L2 cache. Shared Floating Point Unit.

    Here's the die shot. 4 modules 8 threads.


    Even Windows disagrees with you.


    Just because a module has 2 integer cores does not mean it's a core.

    Also, your fanboyism is showing.
  19. MasterMace said:
    Unfortunately the i7 4770k does not budget well into a build under $1500, nor does a GTX 780ti.

    Also, DQMC that's STILL $40 over budget. And it STILL lacks a keyboard and mouse.


    This is the basic high level look at a module's architecture.

    Shared L1 instruction cache. Shared fetch. Shared decode. Shared L2 cache. Shared Floating Point Unit.

    Here's the die shot. 4 modules 8 threads.


    Even Windows disagrees with you.


    Just because a module has 2 integer cores does not mean it's a core.

    Also, your fanboyism is showing.

    Are we looking at different links? My latest suggestion was $2 under 1300 without mouse or keyboard. (http://pcpartpicker.com/p/302es) I don't include a mouse or keyboard because the things I recommend are probably not what most people want, it would bring the price to $1310 if I did.

    And just because the cores share memory resources doesn't mean they aren't separate cores. AMD is cheating a little, but it is an 8 core processor.

    I'm not saying the 8320 is better than an i5, I'm just saying it's becoming a better gaming CPU as games support more and more multithreading. Skyrim is an old game, it doesn't support multithreading. Look at the i5 vs the i7. You only see that small of a gap when multi-threading isn't supported.

    So, yes. Intel destroys AMD in singlethreaded apps, but games are becoming multithreaded. Therefore, AMD CPUs are "becoming more powerful."

    I agree my original build was sub optimal, as to take advantage of the two GPUs you would want a much higher resolution monitor. At that point, there wouldn't even be a CPU bottleneck and the 8320 would be fine. Also bear in mind, that my original build was me trying to fit dual GTX 770s into $1300, which is essentially a novelty build. My serious SLI build I have reposted above.

    And I'm really not an AMD fanboy. If you look at my posting history, I almost never recommend AMD. It almost fit here though, so I went with it.
  20. DonQuixoteMC said:
    MasterMace said:
    Unfortunately the i7 4770k does not budget well into a build under $1500, nor does a GTX 780ti.

    Also, DQMC that's STILL $40 over budget. And it STILL lacks a keyboard and mouse.


    This is the basic high level look at a module's architecture.

    Shared L1 instruction cache. Shared fetch. Shared decode. Shared L2 cache. Shared Floating Point Unit.

    Here's the die shot. 4 modules 8 threads.


    Even Windows disagrees with you.


    Just because a module has 2 integer cores does not mean it's a core.

    Also, your fanboyism is showing.

    I'm not saying the 8320 is better than an i5, I'm just saying it's becoming a better gaming CPU as games support more and more multithreading. Skyrim is an old game, it doesn't support multithreading. Look at the i5 vs the i7. You only see that small of a gap when multi-threading isn't supported.

    So, yes. Intel destroys AMD in singlethreaded apps, but games are becoming multithreaded. Therefore, AMD CPUs are "becoming more powerful."


    The FX 8320 and 8350 are old processors.
    Pick your poison.





    It doesn't matter which game it is, the AMD CPUs are worse. Thread vs Thread, they lose. Core vs Module, they lose. Clock vs clock, they lose. Dollar vs Dollar, they lose. Watt vs Watt, they lose. There's only 2 price points where AMD wins - a sub $300 build, with most of the thanks to ATI, and a $500 build, with the FX 4xxx that are under $100. $20 goes a long way for a $500 budget.
  21. That's not the point though. Sure, they may deliver lower FPS, but you don't need that many frames per second!

    The build had a 60Hz monitor. The 8350 is powerful enough to deliver at least 60 fps in most every game (especially newer, multithreaded games), making the monitor the fps bottleneck. This means that you do not need a more powerful processor than one that delivers at least 60 frames per second.
    OP specifically asked for a computer to play Elder Scrolls Online and Call of Duty on. Since there are no ESO benchmarks, I looked at the most demanding CoD game: Ghosts. Look at the 8350's Avg. fps.

    Over 60.

    So why spend more on an Intel when the 8350 is PLENTY powerful?

    Now this is where that build fell apart. The monitor was a HUGE bottleneck. With so much GPU power, you would want a monitor with massive resolutions. This turns your performance from wasted frames per second into beautiful high-res visuals that you can actually appreciate. A powerful CPU gets you high FPS, not a nice looking picture. Powerful GPUs get you nice FPS and a nice image. When the monitor is 60Hz, there's only one way to spend your money effectively, and that's on the GPU. That's why I thought the AMD 8320/50 would fit into this build.

    I can't argue that AMD processors are more powerful than Intel processors, it's just not true. I will argue however, that 2 GTX 770s and an 8350 would destroy a GTX 780 and an Intel 4670K at 4K resolutions .

    I do concede that my build was dumb, though I do not concede that the AMD processor made it dumb.

    And now I will stop arguing this because poor TopTyler probably doesn't want to see us argue and ruin his thread.

    To get back on topic, here's my recommendation for your $1300 Gaming PC: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/30AVD
    The GPU array destroys the GTX 780 and the processor is one of the most powerful on the market.

    If you don't care about killer graphics, get a GTX 770 now and add another later for ultimate futureproofing. Additionally, you can overclock the i5 to get more FPS down the road.
  22. The 8350 is not plenty powerful. If you're answer to an argument about processors is "you don't need more", then give up, because you've lost, because you don't know what you're talking about.

    They benchmark at lower resolutions so that you can see the size difference between the CPUs without having the Graphics bottleneck. Starcraft 2 was benchmarked at 1024x768, and the FX-8350 couldn't break 50 fps, how low do you think it's going to go at a higher resolution. Most game engines are not made for lots of threads, and the FX series were designed horribly. The FX series is a terrible choice for gamers, unless you're talking about very low price points. For example, I got an FX 8320 for $100. Is it worth it at $100? Yes. That's a quad core processor for $100. Best deal around. If it was $30 more, would I get it? No. It's not worth it, there are better performing options.
  23. 1) Game engines are going to be designed to take advantage of multiple threads. They just haven't caught up yet.

    2) It doesn't matter what the resolution is, that's GPU dependent. You even said it yourself: "They benchmark at lower resolutions so that you can see the size difference between the CPUs without having the Graphics bottleneck." You wouldn't lower the resolution if it wasn't GPU dependent.

    3) "You don't need more" is the only intelligent argument to make in regards to processors. That's why you don't buy an i7 if you just plan on gaming.

    You're right. The 8350 definitely isn't good enough. Look, when it's fully utilized, it gets 1 less FPS than a 4th Gen i7!!

    Good heavens. We better waste $200 to make up for that.
  24. Okay, so something very critical about the way games are coded was just was illustrated to me. Basically, certain tasks cannot be "spread out" over multiple cores, so multiple core CPUs can only a) help a little or b) help not at all. And so game engines may never be able to fully utilize the 8 cores of an AMD processor, making Intel processors the only intelligent option for gaming PCs of this caliber.
    Read up on the theory behind this here.

    Thanks, geofelt!
  25. How's this build?
    http://pcpartpicker.com/p/35CYr
    U might wanna step up to a 770 if you have the money.
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