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First Build Advice on <$1300 Gaming Build

Howdy folks. I was thinking about buying the Acer AG3-605-UR39 Desktop PC Intel Core i7 4770 (3.40GHz) 8GB DDR3 1TB HDD Capacity Windows 8 but lost out on the great deal a couple of days ago. But with all the research I've been doing, I thought, 'ya know...there are things about that machine I hate. So why not build the machine I want and can afford?

So I would love to see if you guys, who have loads more experience than I do, think about the following build?

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2Zuix

CPU Intel Core i7-4771 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor $312.99
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-Z87X-UD4H ATX LGA1150 Motherboard $179.99
Memory Corsair Vengeance Pro 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory $169.99
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card $339.99
Case Corsair 500R Black ATX Mid Tower Case $109.99
Power Supply Corsair CX 600W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $64.99
Optical Drive Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer $19.98
Operating System Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) $134.94

Total cost with discounts: $1204.85
19 answers Last reply Best Answer
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  1. If this is just for gaming go with a 4670 or 4670k, lower the money on the mobo slightly and get a 780.

    PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2Zvkr
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2Zvkr/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2Zvkr/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z87-D3HP ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Amazon)
    Memory: Corsair Vengeance Pro 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($144.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($489.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Corsair 500R Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair CX 600W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($54.99 @ Microcenter)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($134.94 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $1271.84
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-24 19:49 EST-0500)
  2. woltej1 said:
    If this is just for gaming go with a 4670 or 4670k, lower the money on the mobo slightly and get a 780.

    PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2Zvkr
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2Zvkr/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2Zvkr/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z87-D3HP ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Amazon)
    Memory: Corsair Vengeance Pro 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($144.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($489.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Corsair 500R Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair CX 600W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($54.99 @ Microcenter)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($134.94 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $1271.84
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-24 19:49 EST-0500)


    Why that RAM? DDR3 1600 will be good enough and the difference would be minimalistic and also only 8GB would be my recommendation besides that everything else looks good.
  3. Emelth said:
    woltej1 said:
    If this is just for gaming go with a 4670 or 4670k, lower the money on the mobo slightly and get a 780.

    PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2Zvkr
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2Zvkr/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2Zvkr/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z87-D3HP ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Amazon)
    Memory: Corsair Vengeance Pro 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($144.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($489.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Corsair 500R Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair CX 600W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($54.99 @ Microcenter)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($134.94 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $1271.84
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-24 19:49 EST-0500)


    Why that RAM? DDR3 1600 will be good enough and the difference would be minimalistic and also only 8GB would be my recommendation besides that everything else looks good.


    The idea is room to grow. Starting with 16mb with an option to go to 24 or 32. Thanks for your advice and it is much appreciated. But you right...1600's should be sufficient.
  4. i just kept what he had there, didn't really look at it.

    There is a difference in overall system performance with higher frequency and the difference in price is like a couple bucks, but 8gb wouldn't be a bad idea of 1866 RAM, then you can kick the cooler up to a corsair h100i
  5. Best answer
    is there a reason why you went for such an expensive motherboard? If you wanted a motherboard that can support 1866Mhz RAM there are more economical choices for Z87's out there.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($209.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z87-HD3 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($119.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Corsair Vengeance Pro 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($144.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($499.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: Corsair 500R Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair CX 600W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($26.97 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($141.98 @ Newegg)
    Total: $1255.89
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

    for a gaming build an i7 isn't really needed, hyperthreading does little for most games today and for the games it does work for it provides a very little boost compared to the 100 extra dollars you're putting down for it. Pay no attention the "system requirements" that are being leaked for newer games like Watch Dogs and the like that say you need an 8 core AMD or an i7 to play, no game NEEDS an i7 to run, it would make no sense from a sales point of view.

    anyways downgraded the motherboard a bit too, you're not missing too many important features, you still get the same VRM heatsinks, still get the dual BIOS, still get the USB 3.0 ports. and with that 150 ish dollars wrung from the CPU and motherboard I upgraded to a GTX 780 instead, which will boost your gaming performance way more than a more expensive motherboard or CPU will ever do.
  6. Have I told you guys recently, you cats are brilliant. Getting some outstanding expert advice and thanks. :)
  7. What are you planning the system for? Is this gaming, general computing, heavy computing or what?
  8. The machine is for gaming and general use. I am loving the advice.I am now thinking I should move to the i5 chip, GTX 780 and maybe improve the PSU slightly to take into account upgrades later.
  9. Sounds like a plan, the 4670K should more than suffice for what you want to do, which is why I asked, going up to the 780 will be really nice, just grabbed a couple of them myself (the Asus CU model, and have been playing with them in SLI on my Haswell, but will prob move one to my IB build, also than at that pricepoint, might look at the Asus Pro or the Hero, rest looks good - for PSUs might look to SeaSonic, XFXSilverStone or the like ;) keep us updated on progress
  10. OK folks...revision with your expert input. What'cha think?

    I'll say its to b a gaming machine. I did wanna go with the 1866 ram, and I did forget a Hard Drive...brilliant man be I.

    PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZzpS
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZzpS/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZzpS/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
    CPU Cooler: Arctic Cooling UC-AR7GT-AC-01 28.6 CFM CPU Cooler ($5.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: ASRock B85 Pro4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($74.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($159.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Toshiba 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.98 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($489.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Corsair 500R Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair Builder 750W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($69.99 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($134.94 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $1315.83
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-24 21:47 EST-0500)
  11. Don't want to mix a B85 mobo with a 4670K, also the B85 won't support 1866 sticks very well (mobo is rated for up to 1600)
  12. Tradesman1 said:
    Don't want to mix a B85 mobo with a 4670K, also the B85 won't support 1866 sticks very well (mobo is rated for up to 1600)


    OK...second revision...and thanks :)

    PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZB5C
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZB5C/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/2ZB5C/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4570 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($192.99 @ NCIX US)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master RR-H101-22FK-RI 30.0 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($15.26 @ NCIX US)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z87X-UD4H ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($159.99 @ Microcenter)
    Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($159.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Toshiba 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.98 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: Asus Radeon R9 280X 3GB Video Card ($328.99 @ Staples)
    Case: Rosewill BlackHawk ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair Builder 750W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($69.99 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($134.94 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $1217.10
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-24 22:28 EST-0500)
  13. PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty Z87 Killer ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($119.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Crucial Ballistix Elite 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($89.78 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.00 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($499.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: Corsair 550D ATX Mid Tower Case ($119.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic M12II 650W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($95.98 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($134.94 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $1389.62
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-24 23:19 EST-0500)
    little more expensive, but rock solid parts, designed to run cool and quiet, no freight train's on your desk, and good looks
  14. The 4570 is a locked chip, so a z-rated board is wasted money. a H87 will do the same, without the overclocking stuff, and will cost you less money. The Unlocked cpu's are the ones with a "K" in them, such as 3570K, 4770K and these match up best with the Z87 boards.

    That cpu cooler is barely more than the stock cooler and will probably sound like it when the cpu is taxed.

    Even for school stuff, you won't use 16GB really for anything, unless you do a lot of stuff like Photoshop, 3d rendering, computer graphics and design etc, so its a waste of your cash there, 8GB will be just fine. 1866MHz sounds nice, but your cpu internals stuff runs @1600MHz tops, which is a nice 1:1 ratio. The only thing your cpu is going to do is work a little harder and therefore quite hotter for a little more speed. Oh wait, you mentioned that brick for a cpu cooler....

    You have an idea for a pretty fast and expensive computer. Love it. The psu is its heart and soul, its the singlemost important part as it touches upon everything, and every part is dependent on its good graces. This isthe oneplace where its most important never to go cheap. Its like putting a Volkswagon engine in a Ferrari, sure it'll run, good luck with 200mph. Saving money is fine, but a quality psu is worth more than its weight here.
  15. the z chipset has nothing to do with OC. Think more RAM and SLI capabilities. You can match a h87 with a K series and get same performance.
  16. Karadjgne said:
    The 4570 is a locked chip, so a z-rated board is wasted money. a H87 will do the same, without the overclocking stuff, and will cost you less money. The Unlocked cpu's are the ones with a "K" in them, such as 3570K, 4770K and these match up best with the Z87 boards.

    That cpu cooler is barely more than the stock cooler and will probably sound like it when the cpu is taxed.

    Even for school stuff, you won't use 16GB really for anything, unless you do a lot of stuff like Photoshop, 3d rendering, computer graphics and design etc, so its a waste of your cash there, 8GB will be just fine. 1866MHz sounds nice, but your cpu internals stuff runs @1600MHz tops, which is a nice 1:1 ratio. The only thing your cpu is going to do is work a little harder and therefore quite hotter for a little more speed. Oh wait, you mentioned that brick for a cpu cooler....

    You have an idea for a pretty fast and expensive computer. Love it. The psu is its heart and soul, its the singlemost important part as it touches upon everything, and every part is dependent on its good graces. This isthe oneplace where its most important never to go cheap. Its like putting a Volkswagon engine in a Ferrari, sure it'll run, good luck with 200mph. Saving money is fine, but a quality psu is worth more than its weight here.



    You are right about the cpu cooler...36 db. I was thinking a 750w budget on a machine rated at 443w (figure 20% overage for alternating current, so 531w) would be sufficient to start. I think the folks have convinced me that the 1600 ram is better. The difference in a K chip and not is like 5 bucks and it might be worth it to have the capability to overclock.

    Any suggestions on alternatives? And thanks pard'ner. :)
  17. woltej1 said:
    the z chipset has nothing to do with OC. Think more RAM and SLI capabilities. You can match a h87 with a K series and get same performance.


    The two games I play a lot are world of tanks and second life. SL isn't that intensive, but WOT is more graphic intensive. I wonder about the ram?

    Thanks for your help pard'ner. :)
  18. RAM has little performance gains in games, the speedier the RAM the faster it can write data into memory (so less stuttering in certain cases) but most of the intensive work is done by the GPU
  19. Quote:
    The H87 chipset is very similar to Z87, but lacks a few important features including CPU overclocking. While this chipset can easily handle SLI/Crossfire configurations by allowing the 16 PCI-E lanes from the CPU to be divided into either a single x16 slot or dual x8 slots, it does not support triple SLI/Crossfire configurations.

    Like Z87, H87 supports Rapid Storage Technology, Smart Response Technology (otherwise known as SSD Caching), six SATA 6Gb/s ports and six USB 3.0 ports. Unlike Z87, it adds Small Business Advantage support, but removes support for Lake Tiny (SSD caching performance and power optimization). Finally, it supports two DIMMs per memory channel so it will be able to utilize up to four sticks of RAM.

    H87 provides most of the same features as Z87 including plenty of SATA 6Gb/s and USB 3.0 ports. The only major features it lacks is CPU overclocking support and support for triple SLI/Crossfire configurations. Unfortunately, many motherboard manufactures attempt to push users to Z87 motherboards by limiting the number of ports and headers on their H87 motherboards. Because of this, Z87 motherboards are sometimes a better choice than H87 even when you do not need overclocking or triple SLI/Crossfire.

    http://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Z87-H87-H81-Q87-Q85-B85-What-is-the-difference-473/

    Very good article to read on exactly what mobo does what... and what chipset does or doesn't do, for those who don't already know, or think they do.
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