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Data recovery from damaged SSD (Need a specific tool)

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February 25, 2014 6:53:01 AM

As the title says I want to recover some Data from a damaged SSD, but this is a specific case. I know what I have to do, but I don't know which tool is able to do it, or if there even is one, so here goes:
The SSD caused 2 system freezes, and after the second one I couldn't start Windows anymore, I only got an eternal splash screen.
As I have found out the reason is that somewhere about 2,8 GB into the partition there is a sector which can't be read, causing Windows to try over and over...
Basically I should be able to recover my data by copying the partition, and ignoring the damaged sector, which also works. That is until I reach an area around 11 GB, that's where things become ugly, because even when I try to copy the partition, if it gets to this point whatever I do crashes completely (attempted with Acronis B&R and True Image, as well as GParted). Pluging in the SSD as an external drive under Windows results in nothing, whereas Live Linux and the UEFI are still able to recognize the drive, Linux and Acronis even correctly tell me the File System and the amount of data.

So what I need is a tool that could somehow copy the data, but Ignore the first 15GB or so, that area doesn't contain anything intresting anyway.
Ideally that'd be accessing the partition table which is shortly after 350MB into the SSD and the file system, then ignoring the zone between 1-15 GB and only reading out the files from after that (hoping there aren't more damaged sectors of course).

The other option would be a tool which I could tell to do a raw search of the Hard Drive, and again, ignore the parts above.

All this can't run under Windows, as Windows is definitely not able to deal with the drive anymore, so it has to be Linux or bootable by itself.

Any ideas?

[By the way, I'd dislike losing the data, but it won't kill me as I do have a Backup, just not as current as I'd like to. Oh and please don't suggest any tools I'd have to pay for. My time currently is not worth much money and even paying something like 25$ or more would waste the purpose of trying to recover the data.]
a c 80 G Storage
February 26, 2014 11:13:14 AM

Well if windows saw it as NTFS I would have reccomened a program called Roadkills Unstoppable copier as it can skip damaged/corrupt files.

I use a program called Power Data Recovery and it works great for me. I've saved a lot of my clients stuff from old and failing hard drives. Even used it on myself when my Data drive showed up as RAW one day. There are other apps out there as well. Not sure of many that are Boot able. I think Actives Undelete is bootable though.
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February 28, 2014 12:01:38 AM

drtweak said:
Well if windows saw it as NTFS I would have reccomened a program called Roadkills Unstoppable copier as it can skip damaged/corrupt files.

I use a program called Power Data Recovery and it works great for me. I've saved a lot of my clients stuff from old and failing hard drives. Even used it on myself when my Data drive showed up as RAW one day. There are other apps out there as well. Not sure of many that are Boot able. I think Actives Undelete is bootable though.


I took a look at that Unstoppable copier, I could install that one under Linux, so I might be able to get it working. Then I just have to take a look if it works, If I could see my files and tell it only to copy certain files it might just be the right thing.

And I think I should clarify how exactly the drive behaves:
Running Windows System: May ask once if I want to format the drive, however I get no access to the drive and it completely vanishes from the system after some time
Linux: Recognizes the drive mostly normally, even still sees my partition as NTFS
Boot from Drive: Doesn't work anymore as I deleted the boot partition to see if that was what bothered windows. Would that have been the case I could have repaired it, but it doesn't work either way.

I think that the drive itself crashes when the sector around 10GB is accessed, which would explain the behaviour I'm getting. After this crash I also have to shut down the PC before the drive works normally again, that is after it crashed it won't appear for as long as it has constant power.
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a c 80 G Storage
February 28, 2014 11:04:17 AM

Yea if you install the Crystal disk Info thats in my signature under windows it can tell you if its bad or not. Won't tell you where its bad but at least you can know for sure if it is bad. But try the crystal disk info. Otherwise you will need a data recovery utility
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March 9, 2014 8:34:05 AM

Ok, so now I have finished doing everything I could, and I'm going to get the SSD replaced soon. Maybe someone can learn from my experience.

As I already implied, certain areas of the harddrive have gone bad. The way windows treats the filesystem will ALWAYS cause it to access some of the bad sectors, and once it does the harddrive shuts down. No access to the drive is possible beyond this point, that also means that accessing S.M.A.R.T. is just as impossible, tools like Crystal Disk Info (which was one of the first things I tried since I use it for quite some time already) will not even notice the drive is present. The PC has to be rebooted for the drive to start up again, and the power has to be off for a moment.

Step #1 was not to use Windows, it always crashes the drive (in my case at least). As I already wrote above, Linux is capable of accessing the drive without crashing it.
Step #2 was mounting the drive under Linux and trying to rescue as much files as possible. Files which are lying in unaffected sectors can be accessed normally, accessing a file which lies in a damaged sector will cause the drive to shut down, and once it does the PC has to be rebooted for it to appear again. Corrupted files can't be rescued anymore, the exact zones where the drive will crash are always precisely the same.

Well, I did get to rescue some of my files, but the vhdx file of my virtual machine, the one thing I really wanted was obviously done in, as it spanned over 1 quarter of the whole SSD. What do I learn? Maybe SSDs are more reliable, but IF they crash they do it properly.
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