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Building first gaming PC, need noob help!

I'm planning on building my first ever gaming PC. I'm not that techy, but I know enough where I could build a PC with a guide. But anyways, I've picked out all my parts and I BELIEVE I have all the correct components. However I need someone more experienced than me to review the parts I have picked out and tell me if there is any complications with them and if I should swap stuff out, or add anything on. Pricing isn't that much of a problem, but in the end I would like to keep it below 1250$. Here are the parts, all from Newegg.

Motherboard: ASUS P8Z77-V LX LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131824

GPU: ASUS GTX780-DC2OC-3GD5 GeForce GTX 780 3GB 384-Bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814121779

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K Haswell 3.4GHz LGA 1150 84W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics BX80646I54670K, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116899

HDD: Seagate Barracuda ST2000DM001 2TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive Bare Drive, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822148834

RAM: ADATA XPG V1.0 4GB 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model AX3U1600C4G9-RR, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820211855 (I will get 2 of these for a total of 8gb)

Power Supply: EVGA 100-W1-500-KR 500W ATX12V / EPS12V 80 PLUS Certified Active PFC 3 Year Warranty Power Supply Intel 4th Gen CPU Ready, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817438016

Case fan: LEPA Casino 1C (LPVC1C12P-BL) 120mm Blue LED Case Fan, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835494004

Sound card: ASUS Xonar DGX 5.1 Channels 24-bit 96KHz PCI Express x1 Interface Gaming Audio Card, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16829132052

Case: Corsair Graphite Series 230T CC-9011038-WW Orange on Black with ORANGE LED fans ATX Mid Tower Computer Case, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811139027

Total: $1,176.91

What do you think? I kinda feel like I'm missing something for some reason, so if I am please let me know. I am open to ANY suggestions :).
-Thanks.
21 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about building gaming noob
  1. First of all your CPU and Mobo are not compatible, Either drop to a Ivy-bridge CPU or to a Z87 (haswell) board. Unless you are a Audiophile, most onboard audio will work. I don't see you needing to spend the extra money. I would recommend getting a SSD drive also for your operating system and most important games. The PSU is gonna run tight, I would bump it up to 650+ watts
  2. for the ram it is better to buy a 2x4gb set. you can do it your way but if your going to buy them both at the same time then go for 2x4gb set as they are made from the same batch. you also forgot to add an operating system it will run you around $95-100. like scout said you need to either drop down to say a i5-3570k or get an 1150 socket motherboard and if you plan on overclocking def get a 600-650watt and xfx makes the best psu for the lowest price....i would also check out pcpartpicker.com you can insert your build into the configurator and it will give you the lowest prices for each component from a list of vendors.
  3. I would spend less on the gpu, get a better psu, maybe 550 to 650 watts. The gpu seems like overkill, especially if you don't specify or include the monitor. I think a gtx 760 would be more acceptable, since you aren't buying an extremely expensive motherboard and power supply to run this.
    So to summarize. Replace the cpu with a 550-650 watt 80+ bronze power supply, look at total 12v wattage. Get a gtx 760 or 660 ti depending on your price range, since the 780 is overkill unless your running an extremely high resolution. Also, you may be missing your operating system.
  4. Ok, I'll drop it down to the 3570k and boost up the power supply to 650watt. Since I'm dropping down to a different processor and dropping the sound card I'll pick up a 4x4GB for a total of 16gb RAM. I'll keep the HDD but add on a SSD drive for the games. I do have a spare copy of windows laying around so that's why I didn't include it. But will an i5-3570k still offer relatively high performance in heavy tasks?
  5. the 4670k is only 7% better in performance. that being said haswell has better motherboards with better chipsets and features so since you are building from scratch you def wanna go with the latest and greatest. make sure the chipset is z87, it is the only one that supports overclocking. and if you are only going to be gaming 8gbs of ram is all you really need.
  6. schau314 said:
    I would spend less on the gpu, get a better psu, maybe 550 to 650 watts. The gpu seems like overkill, especially if you don't specify or include the monitor. I think a gtx 760 would be more acceptable, since you aren't buying an extremely expensive motherboard and power supply to run this.
    So to summarize. Replace the cpu with a 550-650 watt 80+ bronze power supply, look at total 12v wattage. Get a gtx 760 or 660 ti depending on your price range, since the 780 is overkill unless your running an extremely high resolution. Also, you may be missing your operating system.

    I have an extra copy of windows 8 lying around from when I bought a little desktop last year for basic computing. I already have a full HD monitor and I plan on getting a second to do dual monitors. I also want the highest FPS I can get in games and have something that will last me a long time (4 years plus). I am going to get a 650 watt psu and I'm replacing a the cpu with an i5-3570k.
  7. The z87 is the same thing as a haswell right?
  8. LinERideR said:
    The z87 is the same thing as a haswell right?


    z87 is the chipset that the haswell processors use
  9. How about this motherboard for the i5 haswell. It is reliable enough, and costs a good amount.
    http://pcpartpicker.com/part/msi-motherboard-z87g45gaming
    I still dont see the reason for such a powerful gpu for that price. I think the 770 is the sweet spot for high end performance because you are paying an extra 200 for around a 15-20% increase in ability for the 780
  10. general rule of thumb is get the biggest single card solution you can now. if he can afford it in all of its graphical glory then he should go for it. and at 1920x1200p max settings with 4xaa on crysis 3 the 780 can only pull 40 fps that is with the oc on the cpu. that is AVERAGE fps not including drops which would probably spike down to 25 fps making it seem laggy/stuttery

    http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/ASUS/GeForce_GTX_780_Direct_Cu_II_OC/13.html

    the asus 770 only gets 32fps in same situation

    http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/ASUS/GeForce_GTX_770_Direct_Cu_II_OC/14.html

    and if he did need to go sli later on that 20% would turn into a 40% deficit and that is pretty significant
  11. Here is my updated parts list:

    CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 4000 BX80637I53570K, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116504

    GPU: ASUS GTX760-DC2OC-2GD5 GeForce GTX 760 2GB 256-Bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814121775

    Mobo: ASUS P8B75-M/CSM LGA 1155 Intel B75 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Micro ATX Intel Motherboard, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131836

    RAM: G.SKILL Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBSR, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231416

    PSU: XFX XTR Series P1-650B-BEFX 650W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Full Modular Active PFC With Full Modular Cables, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817207031

    and I've added this SSD: SAMSUNG 840 Pro Series MZ-7PD128BW 2.5" 128GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD), http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820147192

    New total (W/ previous items): $1,035.36

    've checked pc part pcicker and I didn't see any conflict with the mobo and CPU.
  12. LinERideR said:
    Here is my updated parts list:

    CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 4000 BX80637I53570K, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116504

    GPU: ASUS GTX760-DC2OC-2GD5 GeForce GTX 760 2GB 256-Bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814121775

    Mobo: ASUS P8B75-M/CSM LGA 1155 Intel B75 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Micro ATX Intel Motherboard, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131836

    RAM: G.SKILL Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBSR, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231416

    PSU: XFX XTR Series P1-650B-BEFX 650W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Full Modular Active PFC With Full Modular Cables, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817207031

    and I've added this SSD: SAMSUNG 840 Pro Series MZ-7PD128BW 2.5" 128GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD), http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820147192

    New total (W/ previous items): $1,035.36

    've checked pc part pcicker and I didn't see any conflict with the mobo and CPU.



    that is a b75 chipset you will not be able to overclock if you wanted to...you need a z77 chipset for the option to overclock
  13. PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.96 @ OutletPC)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Microcenter)
    Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($74.99 @ Microcenter)
    Storage: Crucial M500 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($74.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($338.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: Corsair Graphite Series 230T Orange ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: XFX XTR 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $1108.83
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-28 23:33 EST-0500)

    If you notice, not all these parts came from newegg. If you stick with nust newegg, some of these parts are $10-$30 more expensive in some cases. It is the reason partpicker.com shops around. For me in my shipping area, these are the cheapest. In your area, it may be different, Also taxes come into play. But in general, its cheaper than sticking to one source. Its also under budget.
    I used your case, but cases are a personal choice.
  14. Best answer
    LinERideR said:
    Here is my updated parts list:

    CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 4000 BX80637I53570K, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116504

    GPU: ASUS GTX760-DC2OC-2GD5 GeForce GTX 760 2GB 256-Bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814121775

    Mobo: ASUS P8B75-M/CSM LGA 1155 Intel B75 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Micro ATX Intel Motherboard, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131836

    RAM: G.SKILL Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBSR, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231416

    PSU: XFX XTR Series P1-650B-BEFX 650W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Full Modular Active PFC With Full Modular Cables, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817207031

    and I've added this SSD: SAMSUNG 840 Pro Series MZ-7PD128BW 2.5" 128GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD), http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820147192

    New total (W/ previous items): $1,035.36

    've checked pc part pcicker and I didn't see any conflict with the mobo and CPU.



    Stick with the i5 1150 socket cpu. 1155 is the older line and is being phased out, no reason to opt for a downgrade at a time like this. A 1150 4th gen i5 cpu will handle gaming with no issues whatsoever. Don't skimp on the motherboard, the features offered by some of the 200 dollar boards make life a LOT easier for someone less tech inclined. Self configuring network, self configuring settings, UEFI bios, etc... These are things that will make life easier for you. I recommend you make use of them.

    In fact, good onboard sound is another built in feature... Get something like an Asus Maximus VI Hero board. I have it and have nothing but amazing things to say about it. The onboard sound supports anything you would hook up to it unless you own your own dolby audiophile $10,000 setup. I looked at that same sound card with a budget of 3k and decided it was completely unnecessary. The 90 bucks you save would cover the cost of upgrading the motherboard to a good $200 tier, which is where you will be very happy.

    You may want to bump the PSU up to 750w. There are more of that rating than any other, and finding a good one won't cost more than 80 bucks. You don't want to skimp on that part though.

    The GPU is absolutely beautiful, and again, the same one I opted for with a budget of 3k... Honestly, if your budget runs over, the 770 is PLENTY unless you want more than one monitor... For comparison, the 760 is capable of playing titanfall better than the xbox one... So the 770 is capable of blowing it out of the water... So the 780 is basically for enthusiast class use or future proofing 5 years ahead. Either way, that thing won't disappoint... Stick with the EVGA brand, they own a big share of the GPU market for a reason.


    If it were me, I would take what you have here, swap the mobo for a maximus VI hero, drop the sound card, bump the PSU to a 750w, run a GTX 770 to save a few bucks because that is overkill for you(unless you want 3 monitors)... Oh and you should probably pick up a samsung 840 120gb or 250gb. They aren't too expensive now, and will offer the largest speed boost to gaming you can get from that point. Definitely worth investing in at least a small SSD to run the OS and most used games off of. Again, swapping to the gtx 770 and dropping the sound card would pay for all this, plus you'd end up thrilled with the results, I promise.
  15. Bad_Kitty13 said:
    general rule of thumb is get the biggest single card solution you can now. if he can afford it in all of its graphical glory then he should go for it. and at 1920x1200p max settings with 4xaa on crysis 3 the 780 can only pull 40 fps that is with the oc on the cpu. that is AVERAGE fps not including drops which would probably spike down to 25 fps making it seem laggy/stuttery

    http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/ASUS/GeForce_GTX_780_Direct_Cu_II_OC/13.html

    the asus 770 only gets 32fps in same situation

    http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/ASUS/GeForce_GTX_770_Direct_Cu_II_OC/14.html

    and if he did need to go sli later on that 20% would turn into a 40% deficit and that is pretty significant


    Bad_Kitty13 said:
    LinERideR said:
    Here is my updated parts list:

    CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 4000 BX80637I53570K, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116504

    GPU: ASUS GTX760-DC2OC-2GD5 GeForce GTX 760 2GB 256-Bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814121775

    Mobo: ASUS P8B75-M/CSM LGA 1155 Intel B75 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Micro ATX Intel Motherboard, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131836

    RAM: G.SKILL Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBSR, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231416

    PSU: XFX XTR Series P1-650B-BEFX 650W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Full Modular Active PFC With Full Modular Cables, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817207031

    and I've added this SSD: SAMSUNG 840 Pro Series MZ-7PD128BW 2.5" 128GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD), http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820147192

    New total (W/ previous items): $1,035.36

    've checked pc part pcicker and I didn't see any conflict with the mobo and CPU.



    that is a b75 chipset you will not be able to overclock if you wanted to...you need a z77 chipset for the option to overclock


    Overclocking isn't really that big of a deal to me. I'll still get pretty high FPS with either a GTZ 760, 770, or 780.
  16. Snow Fox said:
    LinERideR said:
    Here is my updated parts list:

    CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 4000 BX80637I53570K, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116504

    GPU: ASUS GTX760-DC2OC-2GD5 GeForce GTX 760 2GB 256-Bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814121775

    Mobo: ASUS P8B75-M/CSM LGA 1155 Intel B75 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Micro ATX Intel Motherboard, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131836

    RAM: G.SKILL Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBSR, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231416

    PSU: XFX XTR Series P1-650B-BEFX 650W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Full Modular Active PFC With Full Modular Cables, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817207031

    and I've added this SSD: SAMSUNG 840 Pro Series MZ-7PD128BW 2.5" 128GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD), http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820147192

    New total (W/ previous items): $1,035.36

    've checked pc part pcicker and I didn't see any conflict with the mobo and CPU.



    Stick with the i5 1150 socket cpu. 1155 is the older line and is being phased out, no reason to opt for a downgrade at a time like this. A 1150 4th gen i5 cpu will handle gaming with no issues whatsoever. Don't skimp on the motherboard, the features offered by some of the 200 dollar boards make life a LOT easier for someone less tech inclined. Self configuring network, self configuring settings, UEFI bios, etc... These are things that will make life easier for you. I recommend you make use of them.

    In fact, good onboard sound is another built in feature... Get something like an Asus Maximus VI Hero board. I have it and have nothing but amazing things to say about it. The onboard sound supports anything you would hook up to it unless you own your own dolby audiophile $10,000 setup. I looked at that same sound card with a budget of 3k and decided it was completely unnecessary. The 90 bucks you save would cover the cost of upgrading the motherboard to a good $200 tier, which is where you will be very happy.

    You may want to bump the PSU up to 750w. There are more of that rating than any other, and finding a good one won't cost more than 80 bucks. You don't want to skimp on that part though.

    The GPU is absolutely beautiful, and again, the same one I opted for with a budget of 3k... Honestly, if your budget runs over, the 770 is PLENTY unless you want more than one monitor... For comparison, the 760 is capable of playing titanfall better than the xbox one... So the 770 is capable of blowing it out of the water... So the 780 is basically for enthusiast class use or future proofing 5 years ahead. Either way, that thing won't disappoint... Stick with the EVGA brand, they own a big share of the GPU market for a reason.


    If it were me, I would take what you have here, swap the mobo for a maximus VI hero, drop the sound card, bump the PSU to a 750w, run a GTX 770 to save a few bucks because that is overkill for you(unless you want 3 monitors)... Oh and you should probably pick up a samsung 840 120gb or 250gb. They aren't too expensive now, and will offer the largest speed boost to gaming you can get from that point. Definitely worth investing in at least a small SSD to run the OS and most used games off of. Again, swapping to the gtx 770 and dropping the sound card would pay for all this, plus you'd end up thrilled with the results, I promise.


    Sorry, I didn't actually mean to pick you as best answer, I clicked on "pick as answer" by accident. But if you look at my updated list I have got a samsung 128GB SSD. I did drop the sound card and depending on how much your suggested mobo is I may go for it and get the 770.
  17. Karadjgne said:
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.96 @ OutletPC)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Microcenter)
    Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($74.99 @ Microcenter)
    Storage: Crucial M500 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($74.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($338.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: Corsair Graphite Series 230T Orange ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: XFX XTR 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $1108.83
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-02-28 23:33 EST-0500)

    If you notice, not all these parts came from newegg. If you stick with nust newegg, some of these parts are $10-$30 more expensive in some cases. It is the reason partpicker.com shops around. For me in my shipping area, these are the cheapest. In your area, it may be different, Also taxes come into play. But in general, its cheaper than sticking to one source. Its also under budget.
    I used your case, but cases are a personal choice.


    It's a little easier if all the parts are from one place, but like you said shipping is a big factor. I actually live not to far from a microcenter, oulet OC I've never heard of, amazon is eh,superbiz, again never heard of. I prefer to buy form somewhere like newegg or microcenter since I know they're reliable.
  18. pcpartpicker.com is worldwide, and uses companies that are trustworthy and reliable, whether here in the US, or Spain, UK, Australia, Canada, Germany, Italy... and more than a few like Amazon, TigerDirect, OutletPC don't have actual stores, they are online sales only, so warehousing is their only overhead, which cuts costs, so they charge less to get the business, which is why we buy from them.
    With Microcenter next door, you may be able to get better deals yet, depending on taxes, when products go on sale.
  19. Karadjgne said:
    pcpartpicker.com is worldwide, and uses companies that are trustworthy and reliable, whether here in the US, or Spain, UK, Australia, Canada, Germany, Italy... and more than a few like Amazon, TigerDirect, OutletPC don't have actual stores, they are online sales only, so warehousing is their only overhead, which cuts costs, so they charge less to get the business, which is why we buy from them.
    With Microcenter next door, you may be able to get better deals yet, depending on taxes, when products go on sale.


    This, microcenter is local and ez to get to.
  20. Karadjgne said:
    pcpartpicker.com is worldwide, and uses companies that are trustworthy and reliable, whether here in the US, or Spain, UK, Australia, Canada, Germany, Italy... and more than a few like Amazon, TigerDirect, OutletPC don't have actual stores, they are online sales only, so warehousing is their only overhead, which cuts costs, so they charge less to get the business, which is why we buy from them.
    With Microcenter next door, you may be able to get better deals yet, depending on taxes, when products go on sale.


    I;m fine with pcpartpicker, but I just don't like buying from places I've never heard of.
  21. Glad we could help you out, there are so many options, I know I want to see you get the best bang for your buck, as well as the others. Don't be scared to ask
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