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Memory voltage question

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March 2, 2014 3:33:55 PM

Hi there. I'm building a PC for the 1st time. Here's the configuration:
http://pcpartpicker.com/p/331ll

First of all, any thoughts or tips about the build?
But my question is: I've already bought the memory, that appears to be 1.65v and the mobo I've picked appears to support only 1.5 v for ram.
Do I need to return one the memory or choose a different mobo?
Can I choose the memory voltage in bios?
Can I run the memory in 1.5 and have, lets say, 1333 mhz without harming any part?

Please, help me! hahaha

a b } Memory
March 2, 2014 3:39:40 PM

It's not the motherboard, it's the cpu. intel takes 1.5V. you'll need different memory
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March 2, 2014 3:40:45 PM

My recommendation is pick the motherboard you want , features etc. THEN go to that companies website & look up the model & see theit qualified vendors (QVL) for memory. This ensures it will work & allows you to get proper tech support if needed.
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March 2, 2014 3:46:15 PM

jimpz said:
My recommendation is pick the motherboard you want , features etc. THEN go to that companies website & look up the model & see theit qualified vendors (QVL) for memory. This ensures it will work & allows you to get proper tech support if needed.


Noob mistake. hahaha
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Best solution

a c 105 } Memory
March 2, 2014 3:53:18 PM

1.65v is about the highest ram voltage that haswell should run before you rusk cpu damage.
1.65v ram is really 1.5v 1333 ram that can be overclocked to 1.65v and 1600.
It is indicative to me of a lesser quality kit which is why it is priced reasonably.

It should run at 1333 with the 1.5v as default. This lower speed will not materially hurt your performance
1-3%?

Regardless,
You want documented ram compatibility. If you should ever have a problem, you want supported ram.
Otherwise, you risk a finger pointing battle between the ram and motherboard support sites, claiming "not my problem".
One place to check is your motherboards web site.
Look for the ram QVL list. It lists all of the ram kits that have been tested with that particular motherboard.
Sometimes the QVL list is not updated after the motherboard is released.
For more current info, go to a ram vendor's web site and access their ram selection configurator.
Enter your motherboard, and you will get a list of compatible ram kits.
While today's motherboards are more tolerant of different ram, it makes sense to buy ram that is known to work and is supported.

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