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LGA2011 or LGA1150 For New Build

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March 2, 2014 5:40:38 PM

I'm in the process of building a PC and I need some assistance to finalise it.

The PC would be used mostly for
Designing in Photoshop,Indesign and Illustrator
Video Editing in Adobe Premiere and After Effects
Photo editing in Lightroom
General Browsing
Minimal Gaming

Now I am working on a budget of $1200
My LGA 2011 Setup CPU+Motherboard = $631
My LGA 1150 Setup CPU+Motherboard = $444

With the LGA 2011 I've opted for an inferior Graphics card
LGA 2011 – R5450 1GB
LGA 1150 – R7 240 2GB

I still have the option of removing the video card altogether from the LGA2011 system and adding one at a later date if necessary.

I've cut down as much as I can to make the prices as close as possible, mainly with a cheaper Monitor and Case for the LGA 2011.

Do you think for my purposes it's better for me to get the more expensive ISP monitor (since there's a ton of design work happening on this machine)

Lastly, the cases.

The case i chose for the LGA 2011 is
Coolmaster Force 500 – $49 http://www.coolermaster.com/case/mid-tower/cm-force-500...
For the LGA 1150
Thermaltake Urban T21 – $95
http://www.thermaltake.com.au/products-model.aspx?id=C_...

Is there a big difference in which I choose? I prefer the Urban T21.

Otherwise I've managed to keep the other parts fairly similar with slightly cheaper models for the LGA 2011
The final setup prices came to

LGA 2011 – $1245
LGA 1150 – $1196

Can I have some advice on where I should go from here,
Thanks

More about : lga2011 lga1150 build

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March 2, 2014 5:45:06 PM


I would say 1150 I think the upgrade path is better. the 2011 needs quad channel ram or something doesn't it? With that said I would go 2011 for a non gaming, editing build.
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March 2, 2014 5:54:57 PM

For the tasks you list, definitely 2011 is best, but ye gods get a decent GPU! :D  One or more used GTX 580 3GB
is a good budget option for use with Adobe apps, ie. CUDA acceleration (if you can't afford something more ideal
upfront like a 780 Ti or Titan). See:

http://forums.creativecow.net/thread/2/1019120

I've posted extensively on that thread & elsewhere about systems for AE and related issues. Note that if
you want to oc the CPU (eg. my AE system has a 3930K @ 4.7, 64GB DDR3/2133 and four GTX 580 3GB),
then get a bigger case, preferably something that can take an H80 or better watercooler. Also helps with
choosing a cooling setup that minimises noise. Smaller case = smaller fans = more noise.

Btw, personally I'd recommend the ASUS P9X79E WS, but perhaps that's beyond your budget.


And yes, get an IPS monitor! Definitely do not use a TN panel for any kind of pro work. Dell
does some good 24" 1920x1200 models, as does HP. Don't get a 1080 model. The extra height
from a 1200 will prove very useful. Or if you can afford it, the Dell 27" 2560x1440 IPS is also good.

Ian.

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March 2, 2014 6:24:10 PM

$950 for everything but the case. For some reason partpicker doesn't have the Thermaltake Urban T21

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/337AJ
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/337AJ/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/337AJ/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1230 V3 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($244.30 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: ASRock H87 Pro4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($88.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($131.95 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial M500 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($69.49 @ Amazon)
Storage: Hitachi Ultrastar 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($46.00 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($329.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA 500W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($39.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $950.70
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-02 21:23 EST-0500)
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March 2, 2014 6:44:55 PM

CTurbo said:
$950 for everything but the case. For some reason partpicker doesn't have the Thermaltake Urban T21

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/337AJ
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/337AJ/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/337AJ/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1230 V3 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($244.30 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: ASRock H87 Pro4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($88.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($131.95 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial M500 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($69.49 @ Amazon)
Storage: Hitachi Ultrastar 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($46.00 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($329.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA 500W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($39.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $950.70
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-02 21:23 EST-0500)


Thanks for the build.
Sadly I'm in Australia now so those price, rebates and shipping costs don't match.
A build with similar parts comes to $1250

The Cpu is $50 more
The Motherboard is $20
Video Card is a whopping $100 more
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March 2, 2014 6:51:12 PM

This is the best you can get in Australia :

PCPartPicker part list: http://au.pcpartpicker.com/p/338IJ
Price breakdown by merchant: http://au.pcpartpicker.com/p/338IJ/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://au.pcpartpicker.com/p/338IJ/benchmarks/

CPU: AMD FX-8350 4.0GHz 8-Core Processor ($244.00 @ CPL Online)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H80i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($135.00 @ Mwave Australia)
Motherboard: Asus M5A99FX PRO R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($175.00 @ CPL Online)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($111.99 @ Mwave Australia)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 660 2GB Video Card ($249.00 @ CPL Online)
Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($85.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($135.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Total: $1203.99
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-03 13:57 EST+1100)
It might not be LGA 1150 But it works just as good :)  :D 
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March 2, 2014 6:53:46 PM

Ah I didn't know you were in Australia.

PCPartPicker part list: http://au.pcpartpicker.com/p/338AE
Price breakdown by merchant: http://au.pcpartpicker.com/p/338AE/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://au.pcpartpicker.com/p/338AE/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1230 V3 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($299.00 @ CPL Online)
Motherboard: ASRock B85M Pro4 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($87.00 @ CPL Online)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($103.99 @ Mwave Australia)
Storage: Crucial M500 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($99.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($314.00 @ CPL Online)
Power Supply: XFX TS 550W 80+ Gold Certified ATX Power Supply ($99.00 @ PLE Computers)
Total: $1001.99
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-03 13:53 EST+1100)
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March 2, 2014 7:43:02 PM

CTurbo said:
Ah I didn't know you were in Australia.

PCPartPicker part list: http://au.pcpartpicker.com/p/338AE
Price breakdown by merchant: http://au.pcpartpicker.com/p/338AE/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://au.pcpartpicker.com/p/338AE/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1230 V3 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($299.00 @ CPL Online)
Motherboard: ASRock B85M Pro4 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($87.00 @ CPL Online)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($103.99 @ Mwave Australia)
Storage: Crucial M500 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($99.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($314.00 @ CPL Online)
Power Supply: XFX TS 550W 80+ Gold Certified ATX Power Supply ($99.00 @ PLE Computers)
Total: $1001.99
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-03 13:53 EST+1100)


So I decided to use your original build and do some sourcing of parts from different stores in my area. (Within driving distance to avoid shipping costs)
Still more than your build but wasn't bad.

Intel Quad Core Xeon CPU E3-1230v3 - $299
ASRock H87M-PRO4 M/B, Socket 1150 - $105
Gigabyte GTX760 - $305
Crucial DDR3 PC12800-16GB Kit - $175
Sandisk Ultra Plus SSD SDSSDHP-128GB - $95
Corsair 430Watt 80Plus Bronze Power Supply - $69
Total: $1048

I decided to not get a HDD because I have a fairly new 1TB External I've barely used and a empty 320GB 2.5"
I also decided to get only 430W Power Supply after looking into the max power my machine would be using if I only upgrade memory and HDD from this point on (which is all I would upgrade in the future)
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March 2, 2014 7:57:15 PM

look into the motherboard being compatible with the XEON, apparently even if the socket is the same it does not mean that motherboard will work. Make sure XEONs are listed in the compatible CPU list for that motherboard. To my memory (I haven't looked into it for a while) but XEON supported motherboards are pretty expensive.
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March 2, 2014 7:58:57 PM

and why are we recommending a XEON anyways? ECC supported RAM?
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March 2, 2014 8:00:05 PM

A Corsair 430w psu is terrible for this build.

The Xeon e3-1230v3 will work in any LGA1150 motherboard.
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March 2, 2014 8:01:14 PM

Quote:
and why are we recommending a XEON anyways? ECC supported RAM?


ECC RAM is optional. Not mandatory.

I recommend this Xeon because it is an i7 for the price of an i5.
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March 2, 2014 9:00:27 PM

I am even more confused now than when I first posted.

So since I WILL NOT be doing a ton of Gaming and mostly Designing and Editing, I should go with 2100?
Please, I need a definitive answer, not gaming builds.
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Best solution

a b à CPUs
March 3, 2014 1:47:07 AM

This is why I recommend S2011. Sorry to say this but the suggestions from others so far have been
mostly completely incorrect for your tasks. Your op says, "minimal gaming". Merely including AE in
your tasks llist means your system really needs to have as much RAM as possible, and an SSD for
the AE cache (one can use the same SSD for both the media cache and the main disk cache).

If your budget can't stretch to buying all new, then source used items where it's sensible, or leave
some aspect at entry level (eg. get a used GTX 580 1.5GB which will still be very good for Adobe apps)
and upgrade it later.

But don't get an 8350 or somesuch with hardly any RAM and a cheap PSU for the kind of tasks you've
described, that would be very unwise.

Please have a look at the posts I made on the Creativecow thread mentioned above. Advising people
on pro builds is one of the main things I do, especially for AE setups.

Btw, there are some excellent sources of used X79 boards out there. If you can't start off with a
much more appropriate board like an ASUS P9X79E-WS, then for example consider a Gigabyte GA-X79-UD3;
I bought a UD3 last week for just 60 UKP (I got mine from Novatech, one of the best UK sellers on eBay).

Perhaps the only item you'll probably have to buy new (and wise to do so really) is the RAM. Don't get
less than 16GB, and for Adobe apps it's probably not worth the expense of having anything faster than
DDR3/2133, although sometimes product pricing can mean a faster kit may actually be cheaper (I bought
two 32GB DDR3/2400 TridentX kits for my AE setup, because they were cheaper than the 2133 kits, but
I run them at 2133).

When it comes to getting the most for your money though, there are plenty of bargains to be had with
respect to SSDs, PSUs, cases, etc. One caveat: for motherboards on eBay, only ever buy from a seller
that lists an item as, "Returns Accepted".

For a case that has plenty of room to handle all the parts with lots of space for future expansion,
the Cooler Master HAF 932 is good, or the Aerocool XPredator (not the newer X1).

Ian.

PS. Re the CPU for a S2011 build: if you can't get a 3930K in the 1st instance, then buy a 4820K
as a starting point. It'll be faster at stock speeds than any other suggestion here so far and it'll
oc like crazy.

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March 3, 2014 2:08:35 AM

Beezy said:
and why are we recommending a XEON anyways? ECC supported RAM?


This Xeon is basically a i7 4770 without integrated graphics, for cheaper.
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March 3, 2014 3:01:27 AM

mapesdhs said:
This is why I recommend S2011. Sorry to say this but the suggestions from others so far have been
mostly completely incorrect for your tasks. Your op says, "minimal gaming". Merely including AE in
your tasks llist means your system really needs to have as much RAM as possible, and an SSD for
the AE cache (one can use the same SSD for both the media cache and the main disk cache).

If your budget can't stretch to buying all new, then source used items where it's sensible, or leave
some aspect at entry level (eg. get a used GTX 580 1.5GB which will still be very good for Adobe apps)
and upgrade it later.

But don't get an 8350 or somesuch with hardly any RAM and a cheap PSU for the kind of tasks you've
described, that would be very unwise.

Please have a look at the posts I made on the Creativecow thread mentioned above. Advising people
on pro builds is one of the main things I do, especially for AE setups.

Btw, there are some excellent sources of used X79 boards out there. If you can't start off with a
much more appropriate board like an ASUS P9X79E-WS, then for example consider a Gigabyte GA-X79-UD3;
I bought a UD3 last week for just 60 UKP (I got mine from Novatech, one of the best UK sellers on eBay).

Perhaps the only item you'll probably have to buy new (and wise to do so really) is the RAM. Don't get
less than 16GB, and for Adobe apps it's probably not worth the expense of having anything faster than
DDR3/2133, although sometimes product pricing can mean a faster kit may actually be cheaper (I bought
two 32GB DDR3/2400 TridentX kits for my AE setup, because they were cheaper than the 2133 kits, but
I run them at 2133).

When it comes to getting the most for your money though, there are plenty of bargains to be had with
respect to SSDs, PSUs, cases, etc. One caveat: for motherboards on eBay, only ever buy from a seller
that lists an item as, "Returns Accepted".

For a case that has plenty of room to handle all the parts with lots of space for future expansion,
the Cooler Master HAF 932 is good, or the Aerocool XPredator (not the newer X1).

Ian.

PS. Re the CPU for a S2011 build: if you can't get a 3930K in the 1st instance, then buy a 4820K
as a starting point. It'll be faster at stock speeds than any other suggestion here so far and it'll
oc like crazy.



Thank you so much, I appreciate it.
It's admittedly been difficult getting good advice on all the boards I've tried because most of the advice is from people used to building for gamers, which I am not.

After reading your post I did some digging and I plan to get a build that I am pretty happy with, including i7 480k & X79 and falls within my current $1200 current limit.
Only problem is in order for this to work I will have to get my video card some other time.
I decided to go ahead with this especially since i'm not doing a lot in AE right now but more design jobs.
Instead decided in a month or 2 I'll get myself a high end video card

Does this make sense?
It seems like the best option for me. Am I planning smartly?
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March 3, 2014 3:11:35 AM

I wouldnt bother with Socket 2011 unless you get a six core CPU IMO.
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March 3, 2014 4:13:02 AM

Just to clarify what I was saying before, I have a Video Card I can use until I buy a high end version for a couple months.

@RobCrezz .... Wanna explain why you wouldn't go 2011 with a 4 core CPU?
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March 3, 2014 4:16:55 AM

nevewers said:
Just to clarify what I was saying before, I have a Video Card I can use until I buy a high end version for a couple months.

@RobCrezz .... Wanna explain why you wouldn't go 2011 with a 4 core CPU?


Sure, more expense for no performance benefit over a i7 4770k on the 1150 platform.
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March 3, 2014 5:41:00 AM

The only three reasons you would ever need to go with LGA2011

1. Memory bandwith
2. 40 PCI lanes
3. 6 cores or more
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March 3, 2014 5:44:14 AM

I would absolutely go with the Xeon e3-1230v3, H87 board, and GTX 760. It would be perfect for the OP's needs.
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March 4, 2014 8:14:44 AM

nevewers,

There are important advantages to using LGA2011 over LGA 1150 for your applications > double bandwidth, more CPU cache, more memory capacity, more PCIe lanes and very importantly, the ability to use 4,6,8,10,12 and in future 15 core CPU's.

One of your more demanding applications is Adobe Premiere. Premiere in the past few years has done very well to improve it's performance. Video editing /processing is very demanding as there is the potential to process every frame, multiple audio tracks, and so on. Premiere today can use all available CPU cores / threads, has CUDA acceleration, and now uses OpenGL and can address multiple GPU's. Still, Premiere needs as fast a clock speed as possible, and benefits from CUDA acceleration, more system RAM and video RAM. An ideal system would have two eight core Xeon 2687W V2's, 64GB RAM, two 6GB GTX Titans, a pair of 512GB SSD. and so on- perhaps 12000Eu.

Ideal systems are useful because it indicates the direction for the hardware > more cores, more memory, a wide bandwidth GPU with a lot of RAM and CUDA cores, and so on. One aspect to consider is the use of ECC RAM, and in my experience (I've used Adobe CS MC since CS4), the accurate placement of shadows, reflections, particles, and color gradients strongly benefits from ECC and workstation GPU / systems that can run 10-bit color.

That said, my suggestion is for a quad core LGA2011 Xeon > ECC > GTX system, with the idea that the video card may be doubled and the CPU may be changed for a 6 or 8-core in future >

BambiBoom PixelDozer Videorendagrapharific Blazomatic iWorkarama TurboScream 9000 ™$#©™_3.4.14

1. CPU > Intel Xeon Quad-Core Processor E5-1620 v2 3.7 / 3.9GHz 0GT/s 10MB LGA 2011 CPU, OEM> $295 (Superbiiz) (Passmark CPU score= 9199, rank = No. 38) (This system would be extremely enhanced by using a Xeon 6-core E5-1650 V2 @ 3.5 /3.8GHz, which would add about +$330)

2. CPU Cooler > Cooler Master Hyper T4 - CPU Cooler with 4 Direct Contact Heatpipes > $30 (The Stock CPU coolers are supposed to be sufficient, but I've seen terrifying temperatures when rendering.)

3. ASRock X79 Extreme3 LGA 2011 Intel X79 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard > $200 (The X79 is a very fast chipset)

4. 16GB RAM > (2) Samsung or Kingston 8GB 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) ECC Registered Server Memory >about $180 (This allows expansion to 32GB later)(Check ASRock site for compatible models)

5. GTX 580 3GB > about $200 (The GTX 580 has 384-bit bus width, and 512 CUDA cores) (Add a second in SLI later)

6. WD Black Series WD1003FZEX 1TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive> $89. (This is starting without an SSD. While an SSD does load the OS, applications, and files faster, I've found that it is not a substantial time saver after work is underway. I suggest starting with a good performing mechanical drive and setting a C: partition of 240 GB for the OS and applications, a second partition for files, and a third for a system image. Load everything, except antivirus, configure, and tune it all up with updates, run a good performance disk optimizer ("smart placement" and file consolidation) and make a pristine system image before using. Then use the system and refine settings. Carefully optimize the disk again and then migrate by restoring the system image of C: to a Samsung Evo 250GB and use the settings and configuration learned from the initial uses. This saves the many, many rewrites of the disk optimization on the SSD )

7. SeaSonic M12II 750 SS-750AM2 750W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Modular Active PFC Full-modular Power Supply > $130

8. Case > LIAN LI PC-7B plus II Black Aluminum ATX Mid Tower Computer Case $70.

9. Optical Dr > SAMSUNG DVD Burner 24X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 8X DVD+R DL 24X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 24X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM SATA Model SH-224DB/BEBE - OEM > $20

TOTAL = $1,230

________________________________

Cheers,

BambiBoom

HP z420 (2014) > Xeon E5-1620 quad core @ 3.6 / 3.8GHz > 24GB ECC 1600 RAM > Quadro 4000 (2GB)> Samsung 840 SSD 250GB /Western Digital WD1003FZEX 1TB> M-Audio 192 sound card > AE3000 USB WiFi > HP 2711X, 27" 1920 X 1080 > Windows 7 Ultimate 64 > Autodesk Building Design Suite, Inventor Pro, Solidworks, Adobe CS6 MC, Corel Technical Design Sketchup Pro, WordP Office, MS Office Pro [Passmark system rating = 3815, 2D= 767 / 3D=2044]

Dell Precision T5400 (2008) > 2X Xeon X5460 quad core @3.16GHz > 16GB ECC 667> Quadro FX 4800 (1.5GB) > WD RE4 500GB / Seagate Barracuda 500GB > M-Audio 2496 Sound Card / Linksys 600N WiFi > Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit > (earlier versions) AutoCad, Revit, Solidworks, Sketchup Pro, Corel Technical Designer, Adobe CS MC, WordP Office, MS Office Pro [Passmark system rating = 1859, 2D= 512 / 3D=1097]
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March 4, 2014 5:28:11 PM


Hello Bambiboom! Good to see you here & commenting! 8)

Ian.

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March 4, 2014 5:54:14 PM


nevewers writes:
> Thank you so much, I appreciate it.

Most welcome!


> ... people used to building for gamers, which I am not.

Unsurprisingly, gamers will focus on Z87, because despite its limited/split PCIe setup, that's
still plenty for the vast majority of gaming scenarios. For professional tasks though, it's a
very differrent matter, and even the Z87 boards with PLEX (or similar) chips for PCIe lane
splitting may not be suitable depending ont he task - it's unclear atm whether those chips
provide a full-speed CUDA return path back from multiple GPUs, ie. for CUDA, Tesla cards
do under normal circumstances, but gamer cards do not. PLEX chips just confuse the
issue as it's hard to find sold info on this. Using X79 means one doesn't have to worry
about such things.


> After reading your post I did some digging and I plan to get a build that I am pretty happy
> with, including i7 480k & X79 and falls within my current $1200 current limit.

Sounds like a good approach IMO. With an initially limited budget, that's what I would do.
Oh, one obvious idea: hunt for a sued 3930K on eBay instead of buying a new 4820K.


> Only problem is in order for this to work I will have to get my video card some other time.

Sounds wise. Btw, if you just want something to get buy with for a while, I'd be happy to
lend you a GTX 460 for free for a while - I have loads of them sitting about doing zip atm,
including several 2GB cards. Just cover the shipping. PM for details.


> I decided to go ahead with this especially since i'm not doing a lot in AE right now but
> more design jobs. Instead decided in a month or 2 I'll get myself a high end video card

In the interim, keep an eye out for a GTX 580 bargain, especially any 3GB models. For
various reasons, the 580 is an excellent card for AE, faster than any 600 series card,
usually faster than a 780 (for CUDA I mean, not gaming). Two 580s are faster than a
Titan (for CUDA; I keep having to emphasise this in case a gaming-focused reader
here misinterprets what I'm saying).

I spent a while sourcing four top-end 3GB 580s for my system, but even a reference
772MHz GTX 580 1.5GB will perform really well for AE. Infact, given the availability of
used 580s, I honestly find it impossible to recommend a new 780Ti or Titan for AE
*unless* the user was definitely planning to add a 2nd card later, in which case a
single uber card upfront would mean more efficient power usage in the long term.

Put it this way, the two 580 3GB cards in my gaming PC cost 270 UKP total; for AE,
they're quicker than a Titan and leave a 780Ti in the dust. See the creativecow thread
I mentioned earlier, and also:

http://www.randomcontrol.com/arionbench

My old setup with three reference 783MHz 580s is system no. 28. My new setup with 4x
MSI 950MHz LEs ought to be at position 16 or 17, but the page hasn't been updated yet
(scores about 6K+).


> Does this make sense?

Yup!


> ... Am I planning smartly?

Yes.

Ian.

PS. Assuming you're in the US, see items 131131879260, 231173450423, 301114006657 & 221385904274
on ebay.com.

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March 7, 2014 11:50:28 PM

I really want to thank everyone for their advice.
I took it all into consideration and decided to post my final build since you guys helped me so much.

I did look into used 3930k devices but they were still out of the budget so I decided against it.

This is the build I decided to go with, the Video Card I already had from before.

I'd be looking into updating at a later date with new SSD, 2TB HDD and Video Card


CPU Intel Core - i7-4820K 3.7GHz Quad-Core
CPU Cooler - Cooler Master Hyper 212X 82.9 CFM
Motherboard - Asus P9X79 ATX LGA2011
Memory - G.Skill Value 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600
Storage - Kingston SSDNow V300 Series 120GB 2.5" SSD
Video Card - Asus Radeon R7 250 1GB Found a used (3 months old) GTX580 Online for $160
Case - BitFenix Shadow ATX Mid Tower
Power Supply - EVGA 750W ATX12V / EPS12V
Optical Drive - LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer

Thanks again so much for your advice
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March 9, 2014 5:12:18 PM

RobCrezz said:
Sure, more expense for no performance benefit over a i7 4770k on the 1150 platform.


Sorry dude but for the tasks listed by the op that's just plain wrong. He will benefit from the greater
RAM bandwidth and the 4820K, more cache, it's cheaper, and at stock speeds it's faster than the
4770K with proper support for 1866 RAM which the 4770K does not have. But most important of
all, for the tasks he listed (especially AE), the limited PCIe connectivity of any of the 4-core-max
chipsets means they are simply not appropriate.

He's made the right choice, going for something upon which he can build at a later date. That's the
sensible way to do it when building a pro-type system on a limited budget.

Ian.


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March 9, 2014 5:20:58 PM

CTurbo said:
I would absolutely go with the Xeon e3-1230v3, H87 board, and GTX 760. It would be perfect for the OP's needs.


Just to clarify btw, a GTX 580 completely hammers a 760 for CUDA tasks (remember the op will be
using AE among other pro apps/tasks). Indeed, the 580 can even beat a 780 for CUDA, for various
reasons. A modern card is quicker than a 580 for gaming 3D tasks, but not for CUDA, and for AE
that really matters (RayTrace3D function and various aspects of the UI which are hw accelerated).
It also has a lot of bandwidth, which helps. Ideally one would get a 3GB model, but they do carry
a premium on the used market; a 1.5GB model for $160 will work very well, and it's easy to add
more in the future. For AE, two 580s is faster than a Titan, at a fraction of the cost.

Ian.

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March 9, 2014 5:33:35 PM

nevewers said:
Thanks again so much for your advice


Most welcome!

Btw, for future reference if you get a 6-core upgrade, this is the OCN thread which has oodles of info:

http://www.overclock.net/t/1189242/sandy-bridge-e-overc...

(that link points inparticular to a post from someone who submitted a lot of good info on fine tuning)

The ASUS web site also has a good guide, especially if you want to use offset oc'ing for better
power consumption, less stress on the CPU, etc. Indeed, the ASUS general X79 oc guide is well
worth reading.

And compared to all the talk about 6-core meddling you'll come across, if anything you have a
slight advantage initially with the 4820K, ie. more thermal headroom per core to play with.

As it happens I have a 4820K arriving tomorrow, which I'll be putting on the Gigabyte X79-UD3
I mentioned earlier. Different BIOS to ASUS of course, but it'll be interesting to see how it
compares to my ASUS 6-core setup, especially voltages, temperatures, etc. I'll be using a
Corsair H110 and a couple of 580s. Keep in touch!

Ian.

PS. If you ever upgrade your system to the max 64GB RAM, let me know; I collated a series
of references on particular tweaks/changes one can make to enhance the oc stability of an X79
system with max RAM.

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March 24, 2014 8:23:06 AM


nevewers, just curious, how did your build go? I've just finished putting together the 4820K
setup I mentioned above, just with 16GB/2133 and a couple of GTX 460s initially so that I
could run tests to match those on my affects-of-CPU-on-gfx-performance page:

http://www.sgidepot.co.uk/misc/tests-jj.txt

As expected, the 4820K is a small amount faster than a 2700K at the same clock speed,
but using less power/voltage. I've not yet oc'd my 4820K (just at 3.9GHz fixed atm) and
it's not in a case atm either; currently just an open-air setup with an H80 cooler (decided
to use the H110 with my 3930K instead). However, I've been adding general results and
it run pretty nicely:

http://www.sgidepot.co.uk/sgi.html#PC


NOTE: I discovered some things while setting up the Gigabyte board. First, it may be important that
your mbd has the latest BIOS. The low-end Gigabyte board I obtained wouldn't POST until I updated
the BIOS by using a 3930K to do an initial installation (couldn't use the BIOS Q-Flash program, it
complained that the Q-Flash version was too old).

Also, it seems to be important to use the latest Intel INF driver in order to properly support IvyBridge
CPUs, namely the most recent 10.0.13 release. You can get this from the Intel downloads site.

Ian.

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March 24, 2014 8:31:22 AM

mapesdhs said:
RobCrezz said:
Sure, more expense for no performance benefit over a i7 4770k on the 1150 platform.


Sorry dude but for the tasks listed by the op that's just plain wrong. He will benefit from the greater
RAM bandwidth and the 4820K, more cache, it's cheaper, and at stock speeds it's faster than the
4770K with proper support for 1866 RAM which the 4770K does not have. But most important of
all, for the tasks he listed (especially AE), the limited PCIe connectivity of any of the 4-core-max
chipsets means they are simply not appropriate.

He's made the right choice, going for something upon which he can build at a later date. That's the
sensible way to do it when building a pro-type system on a limited budget.

Ian.




Do you have any benchmarks showing improvements in these programs using socket 2011 but with a quad core cpu?
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March 24, 2014 8:58:30 AM

(improvements vs. what? A 4770K do you mean?)

It's quicker than a 2700K at the same clock; I don't have a 4770K with which to test (too expensive
to buy atm, the 4820K cost me massively less). See my reference above. Still the best budget choice
for AE IMO - 2X the max RAM capacity (important for AE), twice the memory bandwidth, and it natively
supports 1866 RAM (the 4770K doesn't) so fast RAM setups should be easier (again good for AE). And
more to the point, it offers him an upgrade path to a better 6-core CPU in the future. With multiple GPUs
benefiting from PCIe V3, it also means better CUDA performance from the larger number of PCIe lanes
from his X79 board.

I'm still doing general tests atm, will try some AE stuff later when I have time, probably next month.

Ian.

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March 24, 2014 9:03:06 AM

mapesdhs said:

(improvements vs. what? A 4770K do you mean?)

It's quicker than a 2700K at the same clock; I don't have a 4770K with which to test (too expensive
to buy atm, the 4820K cost me massively less). See my reference above. Still the best budget choice
for AE IMO - 2X the max RAM capacity (important for AE), twice the memory bandwidth, and it natively
supports 1866 RAM (the 4770K doesn't) so fast RAM setups should be easier (again good for AE). And
more to the point, it offers him an upgrade path to a better CPU in the future. With multiple GPUs
benefiting from PCIe V3, it also means better CUDA performance from the larger number of PCIe lanes
from his X79 board.

I'm still doing general tests atm, will try some AE stuff later when I have time, probably next month.

Ian.



Yes vs a 4770k (its obviously going to have faster performance than a Sandybridge chip from 3 years ago....). I know about what socket 2011 brings extra, im just not convinced its worth the extra cost in this case.

Extra PCI-e lanes only improve performance if its a bottleneck, which in most cases it is not currently unless you use more than 2 GPUs. Will cuda performance increase with the extra PCI-E lanes? Im not so sure, i dont think PCI-E is a bottleneck here.

Memory bandwidth, yes its higher, but can you show a benchmark in these programs that shows more performance? 4770k doesnt "support" the higher speed memory, but doesnt mean you cant use it and clock it to that speed...
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March 24, 2014 10:20:52 AM

I don't understand why you seem to want the 4770K to be better. Why do you need to be
'convinced'? Short of immediate specific data, one can only guesstimate based on Intel's specs
and other results, and all the data implies the 4820K will be quicker. Also, it's not more expensive
(the 4770K costs more where I am). And I suspect your bottleneck comments are just game-biased
opinions. Where's your info source that such is the case for AE? Have you done lots of AE tests?

I will indeed be doing tests at some point comparing PCIe rates on AE performance, but your
argument seems to be that because concrete numbers aren't available right now, someone should
buy the blatantly bandwidth-slower platform. That makes no sense whatsoever.

Ian.

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March 24, 2014 10:30:24 AM

mapesdhs said:
I don't understand why you seem to want the 4770K to be better. Why do you need to be
'convinced'? Short of immediate specific data, one can only guesstimate based on Intel's specs
and other results, and all the data implies the 4820K will be quicker. Also, it's not more expensive
(the 4770K costs more where I am). And I suspect your bottleneck comments are just game-biased
opinions. Where's your info source that such is the case for AE? Have you done lots of AE tests?

I will indeed be doing tests at some point comparing PCIe rates on AE performance, but your
argument seems to be that because concrete numbers aren't available right now, someone should
buy the blatantly bandwidth-slower platform. That makes no sense whatsoever.

Ian.




I dont "want" it to be faster. I just don't believe it will be. Very little is memory bandwidth and pci-e bandwidth bottlenecked at the moment.

If you make a statement saying im incorrect and that it will be faster you should back up them claims with facts, not theory. :) 
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March 24, 2014 10:40:09 AM

RobCrezz writes:
> ... I just don't believe it will be. ...

Based on what data??


> ... Very little is memory bandwidth and pci-e bandwidth bottlenecked at the moment.

For games, yes. For AE, almost certainly not. Seems to me you don't know the typical
sizes of datasets that people can end up working with when using AE.


> If you make a statement saying im incorrect and that it will be faster you should back
> up them claims with facts, not theory. :) 

Sorry but I think the reverse is more valid. The existing evidence suggests it will be
and the conclusions of such are logical. What is yout evidence that it won't be? What
is your rationale? Your chain of reasoning? I know someone who uses AE professionally,
he easily ends up dealing with datasets that gobble more than 30GB RAM, and a render
using multiple GPUs is throwing around a heck of a lot of data. It's a far more stressful
load on the overall system than any gamer benchmark available; games only test a small
number of system components, whereas using AE can hammer them all at once.

So please, exactly what is your evidence that a system with 2X the memory bw and
much more PCIe bw would not be better for this? My experience of observing an AE
professional user working with the application (I might add, it's the same guy who's
creating an AE benchmark which will be used by toms as a CUDA test for future GPU
reviews) and running tests strongly suggested X79 is the best platform for AE. So
far you've provided no evidence to support the opposite suggestion, so until hard
numbers are available it is perfectly logical to base an initial conclusion on published
data such as the specs for each platform, in which case X79 is the better choice.

Ian.

PS. And btw, it seems you have no idea what the word, "theory", means. :D 

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June 25, 2014 6:09:15 PM

mapesdhs said:
For the tasks you list, definitely 2011 is best, but ye gods get a decent GPU! :D  One or more used GTX 580 3GB
is a good budget option for use with Adobe apps, ie. CUDA acceleration (if you can't afford something more ideal
upfront like a 780 Ti or Titan). See:

http://forums.creativecow.net/thread/2/1019120

I've posted extensively on that thread & elsewhere about systems for AE and related issues. Note that if
you want to oc the CPU (eg. my AE system has a 3930K @ 4.7, 64GB DDR3/2133 and four GTX 580 3GB),
then get a bigger case, preferably something that can take an H80 or better watercooler. Also helps with
choosing a cooling setup that minimises noise. Smaller case = smaller fans = more noise.

Btw, personally I'd recommend the ASUS P9X79E WS, but perhaps that's beyond your budget.


And yes, get an IPS monitor! Definitely do not use a TN panel for any kind of pro work. Dell
does some good 24" 1920x1200 models, as does HP. Don't get a 1080 model. The extra height
from a 1200 will prove very useful. Or if you can afford it, the Dell 27" 2560x1440 IPS is also good.

Ian.



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June 25, 2014 7:23:03 PM


(hmichael, I assume the text of your reply is missing?...)

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