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How to Clean Dust from PC?

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  • Peripherals
  • Graphics Cards
Last response: in Computer Peripherals
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March 3, 2014 8:41:51 AM

I bought a new pc 2 months ago now it is getting dusty i want to know how to clean it because i noticed that the cpu fan is getting dusty and also the video card. I want to know what materials i need and how to use it properly to clean dust from my pc because i dont want to damage it.

More about : clean dust

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a b U Graphics card
March 3, 2014 9:06:46 AM

gabatienza said:
I bought a new pc 2 months ago now it is getting dusty i want to know how to clean it because i noticed that the cpu fan is getting dusty and also the video card. I want to know what materials i need and how to use it properly to clean dust from my pc because i dont want to damage it.

Compressed air will do wonders. Just unplug all cables, take off the side casing, don't touch anything unless you've grounded yourself, and spray away! Something I've found useful is holding a vacuum cleaner's nozzle in the vicinity of where you're spraying. It just helps suck up some dust so it doesn't settle back down.

EDIT: Keep vacuum nozzles well away from any of the components themselves. In fact, I wouldn't recommend using a vacuum cleaner on a computer you don't mind destroying. Never mess with static.
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August 31, 2014 2:13:57 AM

can you use a paint brush to clean the mother bored? and heat sinks?
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a b U Graphics card
September 7, 2014 8:15:44 PM

I've experimented with different ways of dusting on old, abandoned PCs. The most extreme I've gone is actually using a towel/microfibre cloth along the PCB (the board). Granted, I did it during a humid summer day, so I can't comment on the risk of static discharge.

As a general rule, the less contact with your components the better. You could probably get away with a paintbrush, however, ask yourself if spending the time and money on getting compressed air is worth avoiding the risk of a dead motherboard.

Also, in my first post I mentioned using a vacuum cleaner to assist in dust removal. In my experimenting, I have yet to harm a PC doing so, but it simply is a dangerous practice. With all the dust particles entering the nozzle and building a static charge, a vacuum nozzle is nothing I would want in close proximity with a computer I care about. I certainly wouldn't use it on a client's computer.

I hope that helps!
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