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Future proof overkill build

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March 4, 2014 8:42:43 AM

Hey,

I want to make a build that is totally overkill/future proof, so that it lasts a long time. I was thinking of getting the following setup: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/33Zt8

I wanted to make a base build like that because it has plenty of expandable/upgradable options (More GPU's, SSD's & HDD's...), I'm also aware of that I will need to change the PSU if I'm going to upgrade.

In my case money isn't really a problem, but I don't want to spend on 4-way SLI 780 Ti because the power usage would go to high (bills 200$+ monthly).

Is there anything I could get that would make this build better for the money? (OS MS Win 7 already bought, with a LG 27EA53 computer monitor).

Thanks.

~Caspr
March 4, 2014 8:48:50 AM

Could prob get away with getting 16gbx2 for now. use whats saved to get a nicer power supply. Unless you actually need all that ram for things aside from gaming.

And im no expert but if you wanted it to be "Future Proof" why are you sticking to 7 :p 
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March 4, 2014 9:14:52 AM

Probably he feels comfortable with Windows 7, there's a reason why microsoft is so eager to already launch Windows 9 over 8-8.1 anyways...

I agree with voreo on RAM, that amount of RAM won't be useful for a long time (at least for gaming), if a time ever comes when games will need that amount, most likely your CPU (the entire platform) will be already obsolete.

I understand the idea of making a time-standing build, but I think you can achieve it with a less costly CPU, I'd say to use that spare money to already have 2x 780 Ti cards in SLI.

Finally, with that sum of money being invested I'd go with a silver or gold certified PSU, again, that extra money from the CPU (if you go with say a i7-4770k) could be invested in a better PSU.
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March 4, 2014 9:21:33 AM

Even tho you said you were aware of the PSU needing an upgrade, that would be my first suggestion. I don't know about you, but putting in a new power supply is one of the things i dislike most about upgrading. I would suggest something that's completely modular, that way you could put in the cables in when you need them, like adding another GPU or something.

Win7 is fine since Microsoft still supports it. At some point they wont and then you'll have to upgrade, but the same thing can be said about any OS.

Voreo is right though about having that much ram. You don't really need it for gaming, but if you are doing something else with it, like video editing, it will still get used. Ram is an easy upgrade.

Also, depending on what you are using the computer for, you might want to get more HDDs in addition to the one you have. I don't know what you plan on using the SSD for, but if its for the OS, its super overkill. If its not just for that and you plan to write to it a lot, you need to be mindful of the write limits that SSDs have. I've also heard that larger HDD may have higher failure rates, so that something else to consider.

All in all, this build will last a long time, but remember that nothing is ever truly future proof.
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March 4, 2014 9:47:02 AM

GMiller said:
Even tho you said you were aware of the PSU needing an upgrade, that would be my first suggestion. I don't know about you, but putting in a new power supply is one of the things i dislike most about upgrading. I would suggest something that's completely modular, that way you could put in the cables in when you need them, like adding another GPU or something.

Win7 is fine since Microsoft still supports it. At some point they wont and then you'll have to upgrade, but the same thing can be said about any OS.

Voreo is right though about having that much ram. You don't really need it for gaming, but if you are doing something else with it, like video editing, it will still get used. Ram is an easy upgrade.

Also, depending on what you are using the computer for, you might want to get more HDDs in addition to the one you have. I don't know what you plan on using the SSD for, but if its for the OS, its super overkill. If its not just for that and you plan to write to it a lot, you need to be mindful of the write limits that SSDs have. I've also heard that larger HDD may have higher failure rates, so that something else to consider.

All in all, this build will last a long time, but remember that nothing is ever truly future proof.


Hey,

Thanks for your response,

The reason why I wanted to get such a large SSD is obviously for the OS, but as that drive get's selected as the primary one for storing files (Downloads, caches etc.), therefore I'm expecting it to be filled up. However even tho It would most likely be advised to stick to a 128GB SSD which also has plently of space.


About the RAM, I agree I could lower it to the standard which currently for me is 16GB @ 1866MHz (8x2), and then just add in more as it's needed (8Gb per slot because it maxes each one).

I also agree that nothing is future proof because technology gets improved everyday,

I'm sticking with Windows 7 because there aren't much diffrences, I'm aware of the boot time.

RaDiKaL_ @ With your response in mind acording to CPU Boss the Intel i7 4930K would be the most balanced choice for really just about everything, the price is about 400$ cheaper and I think the only diffrence is clock speed and cache.


Finally would you guys please make a configuration suitable for me? Keep in mind that even though prices may be high I can save up, money isn't an isue here, but I don't want to have 200$+ bills for electricity...

What I have in mind now: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/341A4
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Best solution

March 4, 2014 10:06:45 AM

Quote:
Probably he feels comfortable with Windows 7, there's a reason why microsoft is so eager to already launch Windows 9 over 8-8.1 anyways...


It will be interesting to see if Windows 9 brings back the start menu like MS has been promising.

There's no such thing as future proof. It doesn't matter if you're spending $500 or $5000, you just can't predict what is going to be out in five years. And on systems like that the higher you go the faster it depreciates and when you go to sell it, you won't get back half of what you paid for it. Spending money on things like a $1K CPU, $400 case and $700 in RAM will in no way shape or form guarantee you a completely future proof rig. The best thing to do is to spend about $2200 - $2500 on a rig with room for upgrades and improvements down the road. That's really about the only way to ensure system longevity. And today's graphically intense games rely far more on having the best GPU you can buy (which currently is dual GTX 780TI) than they do on having the best CPU you can buy.

This is what I would do for that kind of budget:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($234.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Eisberg 240L Prestige 60.2 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z87X-UD5H ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($189.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($84.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($174.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($689.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($689.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: NZXT Phantom 630 (Gunmetal) ATX Full Tower Case ($167.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: NZXT HALE90 V2 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($168.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($23.52 @ NCIX US)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($98.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Total: $2704.40
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-04 13:06 EST-0500)

64GB of RAM is just flat out unnecessary for gaming and DDR3-2133 will provide a huge boost in overclocking when you go to scale the RAM. And the Cooler Master Eisburg is one of the best loops available as it's based off a Swiftech design that allows for a CPU - GPU loop and is about the closest thing you can get to a full custom loop. That will be a better long run investment than a 4960X will be.
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March 4, 2014 10:29:47 AM

g-unit1111 said:
Quote:
Probably he feels comfortable with Windows 7, there's a reason why microsoft is so eager to already launch Windows 9 over 8-8.1 anyways...


It will be interesting to see if Windows 9 brings back the start menu like MS has been promising.

There's no such thing as future proof. It doesn't matter if you're spending $500 or $5000, you just can't predict what is going to be out in five years. And on systems like that the higher you go the faster it depreciates and when you go to sell it, you won't get back half of what you paid for it. Spending money on things like a $1K CPU, $400 case and $700 in RAM will in no way shape or form guarantee you a completely future proof rig. The best thing to do is to spend about $2200 - $2500 on a rig with room for upgrades and improvements down the road. That's really about the only way to ensure system longevity. And today's graphically intense games rely far more on having the best GPU you can buy (which currently is dual GTX 780TI) than they do on having the best CPU you can buy.

This is what I would do for that kind of budget:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($234.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Eisberg 240L Prestige 60.2 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z87X-UD5H ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($189.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($84.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($174.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($689.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($689.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: NZXT Phantom 630 (Gunmetal) ATX Full Tower Case ($167.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: NZXT HALE90 V2 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($168.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($23.52 @ NCIX US)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($98.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Total: $2704.40
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-04 13:06 EST-0500)

64GB of RAM is just flat out unnecessary for gaming and DDR3-2133 will provide a huge boost in overclocking when you go to scale the RAM. And the Cooler Master Eisburg is one of the best loops available as it's based off a Swiftech design that allows for a CPU - GPU loop and is about the closest thing you can get to a full custom loop. That will be a better long run investment than a 4960X will be.


Thanks for the nice response!

I guess your right, spending so much money won't get me really anywhere besides making a huge loss. Your configuration surprised me at first, with the i5 processor, but then It got to me that that will do.
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March 4, 2014 10:33:46 AM

Caspr said:

Thanks for the nice response!

I guess your right, spending so much money won't get me really anywhere besides making a huge loss. Your configuration surprised me at first, with the i5 processor, but then It got to me that that will do.


Sure! My Intel rig has an i5 and it is more than capable of running current games. It's more about the GPU than the CPU when it comes to hardcore games like BF4 and Bioshock Infinite. I'm definitely planning to purchase a new GPU (probably a GTX 770 or the 8XX equivalent) some time this year, just depends when I get the money.
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March 16, 2014 12:56:12 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Caspr said:

Thanks for the nice response!

I guess your right, spending so much money won't get me really anywhere besides making a huge loss. Your configuration surprised me at first, with the i5 processor, but then It got to me that that will do.


Sure! My Intel rig has an i5 and it is more than capable of running current games. It's more about the GPU than the CPU when it comes to hardcore games like BF4 and Bioshock Infinite. I'm definitely planning to purchase a new GPU (probably a GTX 770 or the 8XX equivalent) some time this year, just depends when I get the money.


The GTX 780 Ti is like the best card on the market right now, I just feel like that it kinda isn't well suited with the i5 or that it might be a bit of a pain to the i5. idk It's just a feeling when I'm trusting a high end GPU to a i5.
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