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First time builder $2500 Gaming PC

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March 4, 2014 8:49:44 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: Sometime within the next month ( I just need a price estimate if they drop, so be it, nice for me)

Budget Range: 2000-2500

System Usage from Most to Least Important:
Gaming (Starcraft 2, League of Legends, Total War series), Video recording, editing, rendering, etc

Parts Not Required: I plan to start from scratch so all parts are required.

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Any websites work perfectly fine, whichever are reliable and have the best prices.

Country: United States (Kansas)

Parts Preferences: I do not have any major preferences here but I prefer an intel CPU base and would like to avoid anything AMD.

Overclocking: Maybe

SLI or Crossfire: In Future

Monitor Resolution: 1920x1080

Additional Comments:

http://pcpartpicker.com/user/TheNoxNova/saved/3XgQ

This is what I have so far, any suggestions and improvements to this without overly increasing the price would be welcome. I do realize that many things seem unnecessary such as high power supply, CPU, motherboard, etc but I am plan to upgrade to more GPUs later and I do not want to be short anything at all.
March 4, 2014 8:55:17 PM

I would cut the ram down to 16GB atleast. With the money saved from the ram, I suggest you get a SSD as well. Other than that, I like the build.
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March 4, 2014 8:59:04 PM

Yeah I was thinking about that, wasn't sure how hard on RAM running video related programs really was. Any specific SSD you would recommend?

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a b 4 Gaming
March 4, 2014 9:02:38 PM

That's a pretty good build so far, but there is really no need for a 780 Ti at 1080P, in fact, a lot of people argue wether even the 770 is all you really need for 1080P, while some still say the 780 is the upper echelon. With my 770 I can max any game at 1080P and have very high framerates. If you are willing to spend all that money on a 780 Ti, that's fine, it's an incredible piece of hardware, and the 4770K is a good combo, however you should either get a higher resolution monitor or at least a 120Hz 1080P monitor, else you are kind of squandering your PC's power.
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a b 4 Gaming
March 4, 2014 9:09:20 PM

Made quite a few changes, but you won't lose any performance and you will be able to SLI in the future.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($329.98 @ OutletPC)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($94.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus Maximus VI Hero ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($194.79 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance Pro 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($176.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($149.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($699.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 300R ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Antec High Current Pro 1200W 80+ Gold Certified ATX Power Supply ($229.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($134.94 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: BenQ RL2455HM 60Hz 24.0" Monitor ($172.98 @ Best Buy)
Keyboard: Thermaltake eSPORTS Challenger Pro Wired Gaming Keyboard ($65.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Mouse: Razer Naga Hex Wraith Red Edition Wired Laser Mouse ($69.65 @ Amazon)
Total: $2490.22
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-05 00:08 EST-0500)
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March 4, 2014 9:10:42 PM

I support your i7 4770k + GTX 780ti combo at this price range.
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March 4, 2014 9:18:34 PM

TheNoxNova said:
Yeah I was thinking about that, wasn't sure how hard on RAM running video related programs really was. Any specific SSD you would recommend?



I use recommend the Samsung Evo or the Pro
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March 4, 2014 9:19:00 PM

MasterMace said:
I support your i7 4770k + GTX 780ti combo at this price range.


I totally agree ^^^
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March 4, 2014 9:19:00 PM

MasterMace said:
I support your i7 4770k + GTX 780ti combo at this price range.


I totally agree ^^^
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a c 275 4 Gaming
March 4, 2014 9:31:27 PM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($329.98 @ OutletPC)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Asus Maximus VI Hero ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($194.79 @ Amazon)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($131.50 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($149.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($85.45 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($699.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Phantom (Black) ATX Full Tower Case ($119.99 @ Best Buy)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($124.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: Crossover 27Q LED 60Hz 27.0" Monitor ($389.50 @ Amazon)
Mouse: Razer Razer Naga 2014 Wired Laser Mouse ($67.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $2434.11
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-05 00:21 EST-0500)

-1440p monitor.
-ROG board.
-Better cooling 780 ti.
-Added a SSD.
-850w is plenty for SLI.
-Updated version of the Naga with more buttons.
-Removed keyboard because it's not worth the price. Left some headroom for a good mechanical keyboard.
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March 4, 2014 9:32:55 PM

zemiak said:
Made quite a few changes, but you won't lose any performance and you will be able to SLI in the future.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($329.98 @ OutletPC)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($94.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus Maximus VI Hero ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($194.79 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance Pro 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($176.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($149.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($699.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 300R ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Antec High Current Pro 1200W 80+ Gold Certified ATX Power Supply ($229.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($134.94 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: BenQ RL2455HM 60Hz 24.0" Monitor ($172.98 @ Best Buy)
Keyboard: Thermaltake eSPORTS Challenger Pro Wired Gaming Keyboard ($65.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Mouse: Razer Naga Hex Wraith Red Edition Wired Laser Mouse ($69.65 @ Amazon)
Total: $2490.22
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-05 00:08 EST-0500)


Looked up the changes and they all look quite good to me, was kind of partial to the case design is the only thing that I am not perfectly sure on.
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Best solution

a b 4 Gaming
March 4, 2014 9:35:51 PM

I like this better
Very quiet cooler, sexy armor on the motherboard, cheaper monitor but with IPS for better viewing angle and color, lower wattage on the PSU (for dual SLI, tri is usually not recommended as driver starts to have issue).

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($329.98 @ OutletPC)
CPU Cooler: Thermalright Silver Arrow CPU Cooler ($79.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: Asus SABERTOOTH Z87 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($234.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($144.00 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($149.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($85.45 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($679.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Rosewill BLACKHAWK-ULTRA ATX Full Tower Case ($189.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($124.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($134.94 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: AOC i2367Fh 60Hz 23.0" Monitor ($156.80 @ Amazon)
Keyboard: Thermaltake eSPORTS Challenger Pro Wired Gaming Keyboard ($65.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Mouse: Razer Naga Hex Wraith Red Edition Wired Laser Mouse ($69.65 @ Amazon)
Total: $2461.73
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-05 00:32 EST-0500)
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a c 275 4 Gaming
March 4, 2014 9:46:11 PM

Personally, I wouldn't spend so much money for a 1080p build. You can easily get a 1440p monitor in this build and still max out every game.
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March 4, 2014 9:49:26 PM

okay, I shall look into more monitors real quick, and I have updated the build to include the commonly recommended things such as cpu cooling (didn't realize I missed it in first place), the SSD, and reduced Memory.
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a b 4 Gaming
March 4, 2014 9:54:41 PM

I still recommend the RAM and PSU from my suggested build
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($144.00 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($124.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $268.99
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-05 00:54 EST-0500)
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a c 275 4 Gaming
March 4, 2014 9:54:50 PM

The Corsair RAM is expensive. The Crucial RAM I listed above is ~$40 cheaper and offers the same performance (the difference between 1600 and 1866mhz is negligible).
You're still using a reference cooled GTX 780 ti. Spend a bit more and get an aftermarket cooled version as it is quieter, runs cooler, and overclocks better.
You would probably want to look for a mechanical keyboard over a membrane keyboard. They are more responsive, higher quality, lasts longer, and feels much better. However they can get complex because there are many different switch types and we can't recommend anything because it's all based on preference. You can read up some guides on the different switches, but ultimately it all comes down to feeling it.
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March 4, 2014 10:08:20 PM

does a build like this require liquid cooling? I'm going to be building a machine with a lot of the same components and am trying to understand what the threshold is from moving from generic air flow cooling to liquid cooling. Thanks.
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a c 275 4 Gaming
March 4, 2014 10:31:01 PM

No. Liquid cooling is never necessary, and CLC are typically not recommended for a reason. They are expensive and offer very little compared to high-end coolers. They have the risk of leaking and they are louder, while only cooling a bit better (~5c cooler?). The Hyper 212 EVO is a good, budget heatsink that cools about the same as most single-radiator CLCs. A higher end heatsink like the Noctua NH-D14 or Phanteks PH-TC14PE will cool only a bit worse than a lot of the double radiator CLC (Corsair H100i, Thermaltake Extreme 2.0, NZXT Kraken X60, etc.) while being quieter and safer.
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March 4, 2014 10:40:14 PM

Okay I have made my final update to the build for tonight, so thank you all for the help so far. I ended up going with the Crucial for RAM. Also stuck with the higher PSU just because I may need it later and don't feel like having to buy a new one at that point in time. Switched a mechanical keyboard with Cherry MX Red. Lastly, changed the video card, still a GTX 780 TI though.
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